CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, The Super Compact Record Player, October 1, 2018

October 01 2018

Meet the Super Compact Record Player

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about the Super Compact Record Player

 

Meet the super Compact Record Player

 

Document source:

 

http://www.aph.org

 

from Fred’s Head

 

In this day of high-tech gadgets and MP3 players, it’s nice to see an old favorite still has a chance to be cool. I have a deep love for record players, my parents got one for me when I was a very young child and I’ve owned one all my life. I have tons of records and wouldn’t give them up for the world. I’m thinking I may have to have one of these too.

 

The Crosley Revolution turntable truly fits the word in every way. Where other turntables take up space, this one dances around a desk without ado.

 

Where other record players must be kept in their designated place, the Revolution practically begs to join you on every journey. And where other turntables tangle you in a web of wires, the Revolution effortlessly pairs with any FM radio for cordless, clear sound.

 

It is a turntable of firsts-the first battery-powered Crosley turntable, the first with a platter smaller than a teacup saucer, and the first with a wireless transmitter for cord-free enjoyment. Users can tote this two-speed turntable with them to vinyl swaps or to a friend’s house. Featuring a USB hookup for easy analog-to-digital transfer, the Revolution will allow users to free their favorites from the grooves for digital enjoyment across a variety of devices. This small but mighty turntable also features a headphone jack, passive audio out, and a dynamic full range speaker.

 

Includes a software Suite For Ripping And Editing Audio Content Belt Driven Turntable Mechanism plays 2 Speeds, 33 1/3 And 45 RPM Records.

 

Now if we could only do something for packing all those records around!

 

the cost is $149.95.

 

Click this link to visit the Crosley Radio website to purchase the Revolution turntable:

http://www.crosleyradio.com/Product.aspx?pid=1869

 

That’s it from me for this week.

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

Now you  can subscribe to “‘Let’s Talk Tips”‘ which is my monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,

Business, and Advocacy.

http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

 

I am yet to meet

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Scam alert, September 24, 2018

September 24 2018

A scam alert

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to introduce you to my scam alert.

 

A scam alert

Those emails asking you to login and verify your username and password that appears to be coming from your bank or insurance company.

 

If the email in question that you have received seems to be from a bank or insurance company that you do not do business with then you are okay.  Just delete it and move on.

 

On the other hand if the email in question is from a bank or insurance company that you do business with; then by all means you can read it but my advice would be to also delete it.

 

No bank or insurance company would ever send you this type of email.

Not sure?  Then just visit your bank.

Ask them to verify that they never sent you such an email.

You could also call to verify as well.

 

Some of these types of emails may also go as far as to ask you to provide such details as your date of birth and account number.

Just delete this email and move on.

 

What would happen if you were to respond?

The simple answer would be trouble, lots of trouble, and now you have given a scammer out there carte blanche to hack into either your bank account and/or your very own computer system.

 

That’s it from me for this week.

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

Now you  can subscribe to “‘Let’s Talk Tips”‘ which is my monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,

Business, and Advocacy.

http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Privacy protection, September 17, 2018

September 17 2018

Privacy protection

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to introduce you to my tip on privacy protection.

 

Privacy protection

We are constantly striving to protect ourselves from scams and scammers, but most of all we need to ensure that our privacy, confidentiality, and independence are kept safe from prying eyes and those who thrive on destroying our right to these precious commodities.

 

Completion of income tax forms

In most cases we need to provide our accountants with such things as tax receipts and statements from our banking institution and we need to ensure that we provide the correct and appropriate paper work to our accountant.

How do we do this if we are vision impaired?

 

If we have a scanner, then for much of the time we can use our scanners to read our statements but what if the print on these documents is either faded or sometimes there is handwriting?

Well!  We need to find a trustworthy person to help us out.  It must be someone that we trust; friend, neighbour, or family member.

 

What if we do not have anyone to help us?

Try going to your banking institution and explain your situation to them.  You would be amazed to find that help is there.

 

Other actions:

You could ask your banking institution for electronic versions of your statements.

You could also phone those who have sent receipts to you to see if they can also provide electronic versions to you.

Try calling 1800 622 6232 and explain what you are seeking.

This is the Federal Government’s toll free number – 1800 ocanada.

 

That’s it from me for this week.

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

Now you  can subscribe to “‘Let’s Talk Tips”‘ which is my monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,

Business, and Advocacy.

http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Apps round up, September 10, 2018

September 10 2018

Apps round up

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to introduce you to my apps round up.

 

  1. Chirp for Twitter (watchOS, Free With In-App Purchases)

Chirp for Twitter is the best way to use Twitter on your Apple Watch.

You can browse your, timeline, lists, like and retweet things, and even post your own

tweets.

Sent and view direct messages, catch up on the latest trends in “Trending”, or search for

your favourite hashtag.

Chirp lets you see quotes, pictures, hashtags, mentions, and so much more.

 

Current Version: 1.1.5 (July 28, 2018)

Read Chirp for Twitter’s AppleVis App Directory entry for more information

https://www.applevis.com/apps/apple-watch/social-networking/chirp-twitter

Visit Chirp for Twitter’s App Store page

https://itunes.apple.com/app/chirp-for-twitter/id1397430041?mt=8

 

___________

  1. 4. Himama (iOS, Free)

The device supports the data sharing with Apple’s Health App. Authorized user can

obtain data from your BBT, ovulation test, sexual behavior, menstruation, petechial

hemorrhage, the quality of cervical mucus, sleep analysis, height and weight, so as to

have a more comprehensive understanding of your health status.

What could smart Himama pregnancy preparation assistant do for you?

*          [Finding the ovulatory date to determine the best timing for pregnancy] Input

your body temperature, then you will immediately know the status of your

ovulation of that day.

*          [Earlier detection of pregnancy, superior to any LH kit] Automatically detecting

whether you are pregnant 18 days after conception.

*          [Earlier diagnosis of gynaecopathia, earlier detection for earlier treatment]

Reminding of corpus luteum problems or ovulation disorders.

*          [Sleep monitoring for eugenics] Monitoring on total length of sleep and length

of deep sleep all night.

Core functions of smart Himama pregnancy preparation doctor:

  1. Reporting ovulation everyday: telling you whether you are ovulating, the

likelihood of pregnancy and your high/low temperature zone based on your BBT

of the day;

  1. Drawing up BBT curve automatically, to intelligently observe the status of

pregnancy;

  1. Cause analysis on the difficulties in getting pregnant: reminding of and analyzing

on corpus luteum problems or ovulation disorders;

  1. Sleep monitoring: monitoring the accumulated length of sleep, length of

deep/light sleep; determining the quality of sleep, and monitoring the time of

going to sleep and waking up;

 

Current Version: 1.9.2 (June 21, 2018)

Read Himama’s AppleVis App Directory entry for more information

https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/health-and-fitness/himama

Visit Himama’s App Store page

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/himama/id1116020094?mt=8

 

That’s it from me for this week.

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

Now you  can subscribe to “‘Let’s Talk Tips”‘ which is my monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,

Business, and Advocacy.

http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Odds and ends, September 3, 2018

September 03 2018

Odds and ends

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about odds and ends.

 

ODDS & ENDS

To identify keys, put a piece of brightly colored tape, which can be easily seen or felt, around the key. Similarly, put a colored plastic hood (available from                         hardware and department stores) over the key top. Most laces which copy keys have them available in a wide variety of colors.

 

 

  1. Each household item should have a specific place and should be returned there immediately after use. Don’t just drop something!  That way you won’t have to spend a lot of time looking for it when it is next needed.  Encourage other family members to also return items to their proper place.  After all, organization makes it easier for everyone to find things!

 

  1. It is not necessary to rearrange furniture in a special way in your home, but some changes may be helpful. For example, a coffee table with sharp edges may be moved out of the main circulation area.  Also, remember to keep doors, closet doors, and cupboard doors all the way open or all the way shut. Half open doors are dangerous!

 

 

  1. Stairs can be hazardous! Mark the leading edge of each step with a paint or non-skid material of a color which contrasts with the stairs themselves.  Paint the handrail in a bright contrasting color.  It should extend past the top and bottom steps as a guide to know where the steps begin.  Use a contrasting color and/or a different texture floor material, such as carpet, on the top and bottom landings.

 

 

  1. Good lighting is important for many people who are visually impaired. Incandescent lighting is usually best.  Attach lights to the underside of cabinets, over work areas, above the stove, or above your favorite chair.  If you find you don’t have enough light, move the lamp closer or try a stronger bulb.  Three-way bulbs and dimmer switches provide flexibility when more or less light is needed.  A goose neck lamp often comes in handy, and a battery operated flashlight to look at dials is another useful idea.

 

  1. Low vision aids such as hand held magnifiers, telescopes or binoculars often allow persons to continue many tasks that they did prior to their vision loss, for example: reading print, knitting, watching television and locating street or bus signs.

 

Low vision aids do not restore                       vision!

However, they do make things appear larger, closer, clearer or brighter.  Using your low vision aid(s) requires some patience and practise, as well as good contrast and lighting.  And remember, low vision aids will not harm your sight, they enhance it.

 

Large print numbers, raised numbers, and/or Braille on elevator panels and outside the elevator doors (marking the floor number) are helpful, especially in large buildings.  If you live in an apartment complex, place an identifiable marker such as a decoration or door knocker on your apartment door.  In a hotel, place an elastic band or twist tie around your door handle to ensure you are at the right room.

 

To easily identify baggage when travelling, place several large strips of contrasting colored tape on your suitcase.

 

When walking with a sighted person, use the Sighted Guide Technique.  Hold onto the sighted person’s arm just above the elbow in a C-grip, with your thumb on the outside of their arm and your fingers on the inside.  You will be able to feel and follow the motion of the sighted guide’s body, making this a safe and comfortable method of travel.

 

When walking alone, plan the easiest and safest route to take. Think of landmarks that are easily recognized to assist in keeping travel bearings.

 

  1. When taking a bus, ask the bus driver to announce your requested stop, and sit near the front so that the announcement can be easily heard.

 

When grocery shopping with a sighted person, it’s easy to manoeuvre through the store if you stand behind the grocery cart, holding the cart handle, and let the sighted person lead, guiding the cart from the front.  If you plan to grocery shop alone, call the store in advance and request assistance.  Most grocery store managers are more than willing to arrange a mutually convenient time for a clerk to help you find the items you require.  Some individuals prefer to have a volunteer do their grocery shopping.  Also many grocery stores (and drug stores) deliver for a small fee.

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you

will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

 

 

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, SpeaksVolumz Talking Measuring Cup, August 27, 2018

August 27 2018

Meet the SpeaksVolumz Talking Measuring Cup

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about the SpeaksVolumz Talking Measuring Cup.

 

Meet the SpeaksVolumz Talking Measuring Cup

 

Here is a product that I myself am looking forward to meeting some day soon.  Maybe you would like to go out there and make friends with it?

 

+++++++++++++++

 

SpeaksVolumz Talking Measuring Cup

Talk about convenience! The SpeaksVolumz Talking Measuring Cup is convenience personified! This measuring cup SPEAKS the measurements. If you want the volume in cups, ounces, milliliters, or grams – push a button. If you want the weight – push a button. If you want the density – that’s right, push a button. Tare function enables you to add ingredients without emptying the cup. The SpeaksVolumz Talking Measuring Cup is composed of three parts: detachable lid, measuring cup, and speaking base.

Product Features:

Speaks measurements

Push-button operation in English

Easy-pour spout

Measures both weight and volume

Measures cups, ounces, milliliters, and grams

Programmed conversion for water, oil, milk, flour, and sugar

Tare function “T” enables adding ingredients without emptying the cup

Auto shut-off

Cup is dishwasher and microwave safe (clear cup only)

Uses 2 AAA batteries (not included)

Click here to learn more or purchase the SpeaksVolumz Talking Measuring Cup:

http://www.independentliving.com/prodinfo.asp?number=756972

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you

will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Leisure time, August 20, 2018

August 20 2018

Leisure time

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about leisure time.

 

When playing board games, visually impaired people may find it helpful to use dice that  contrast with the color of the board.  Black dice are easier to locate on a white board and vice versa.  Also, don’t be afraid to substitute larger or color-contrasted objects for game pieces that are difficult to locate.  For example, use a thread spool in a color that contrasts with the board for a game piece.

 

A variety of adapted tools such as large print and raised line rulers are also available.

 

Public Libraries have a wide selection of books and magazines in electronic formats.

 

When hand sewing, use a small bowl to keep track of your needle, thread, thimble, etc.

 

Keep a few needles threaded for quick access or use Self Threading Needles (available from sewing shops).

 

Adjustable seam guides that screw onto the flat bed of your sewing machine provide a tactile guide to measure seams. People with low vision may find it useful to place a brightly colored piece of tape on the seam guide.

 

Keep a magnet in your sewing basket to pick up pins and needles.

 

Many people are not aware of all the recreational and leisure resources available in their own community.  Contact your Recreation Department, YWCA, YMCA, Adult Education Association, Church, Women’s Club, Specialty Groups, and Leagues in your area to find out about the programs and activities they offer.

 

With any leisure time activity, from wood working to knitting, begin with very basic techniques and continue to build on your skills.  People with low vision may find it helpful to use contrasting color and/or larger materials, additional lighting and/or magnification.  Take your time and remember, a little patience goes a long way!

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you

will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Cleaning & laundry, August 6, 2018

August 06 2018

Cleaning & laundry

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about cleaning & laundry.

 

CLEANING & LAUNDRY

Wear an apron with large pockets when cleaning. The pockets may be used to hold cleaning materials such as a dust cloth and polish, or may be used to hold small items you pick up along the way and plan to return to their original storage places.  Likewise, put cleaning materials in a basket or bucket and carry it around the house with you so all materials will be handy as needed.

 

 

Avoid spot cleaning!  Clean the whole surface to ensure no spots are missed.  When cleaning counters, start at one end and work to the other in overlapping strips.  Use your free hand to check areas just cleaned for extra stubborn spots.  Also work in overlapping strips when dusting, vacuuming, washing floors, etc.  In large areas, you may find it helpful to divide the surface into sections such as halves or quarters, with overlapping boundaries.  Use pieces of furniture (for example, a chair in the middle of the kitchen floor), or use permanent fixtures to mark the boundaries of each section you are cleaning.

 

 

 

Transfer liquid cleaners into containers with pumps for easy use.  Containers can be filled with a funnel.  Remember that flat-sided bottles upset easily.

 

To fill a steam iron use a turkey baster, a funnel, or a squirt bottle.

 

Safety pins or Sock Tuckers (available in department stores) can be used to keep socks in pairs during washing and drying.  Some people find it helpful to buy socks in different colors, patterns or textures for sorting purposes.

 

Wash small items in a pillow case or small mesh laundry bag to keep them from getting lost.

 

To measure laundry detergent use the scoop provided. Avoid pouring directly from the box.

 

 

LEISURE TIME!

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

 

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, The Talking Color Analyzer For People Who Are Blind Or Color-blind, August 13, 2018

August 13 2018

Meet the Talking Color Analyzer For People Who Are Blind Or Color-blind

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about the Talking Color Analyzer For People Who Are Blind Or Color-blind.

 

I am yet to meet this product but I wanted to drop by and introduce it to you.

Why not go out there and make friends with it!

 

+++++++++++++++

 

ColorTest II: Talking Color Analyzer For People Who Are Blind Or Color-blind

ColorTest II is a hand-held device that helps the user distinguish colors independently. It has hundreds of uses at home, work, or school, including selecting your own wardrobe; identifying products from the package color; determining if fruit is ripe; and distinguishing colored folders, forms.

 

Features

Uses a clear human voice to announce the color of any object placed in contact with its sensitive detector.

Senses over 1,000 nuances of color. Also detects patterns, brightness, and contrast.

Can provide color analysis with specific values for brightness, hue, and saturation.

 

Use as a light detector.

Talking clock, calendar, timer, thermometer, and three games

Earphone jack and holes to accommodate a neck loop (earphone not included)

Built-in rechargeable battery with talking battery status

Included

Carrying case

Battery charger

Instructions on cassette, plus a large print and braille “quick start” booklet

One year limited warranty

ColorTest II is about the size of a television remote control and can sense over 1,000 shades of color!

ColorTest II:

Catalog Number: 1-03951-00

Go to the link on the next line to  purchase the ColorTest II: Talking Color Analyzer for People Who Are Blind or Color-blind.

https://shop.aph.org/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_ColorTest%20II:%20Talking%20Color%20Analyzer%20for%20People%20Who%20Are%20Blind%20or%20Color-blind:%20English%20Version_1135898P_10001_11051

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.

1839 Frankfort Avenue

Mailing Address: P. O. Box 6085

Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085

Toll Free: 800-223-1839

Phone: 502-895-2405

Fax: 502-899-2274

E-mail:

info@aph.org

Web site:

http://www.aph.org

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you

will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

Guest Post: A review of Aira. What it is, how it works, and the ways it has changed my life, by Jonathan Mosen

Here is a great article written by Jonathan Mosen about Aira:

 

http://mosen.org/aira/

 

A review of Aira. What it is, how it works, and the ways it has changed my life

mosen.org

 

A review of Aira. What it is, how it works, and the ways it has changed my life

Introduction

 

Recently, I was pleased to attend the CSUN assistive technology conference. I’ve had the privilege of going to 10 of these before, but it has been a few

years since I was there last.

 

When you’re involved with an industry, you tend to watch developments so closely that changes usually seem incremental. But occasionally, something new

comes along that is so game changing, it stops you in your tracks. For me, San Diego-based Aira is one such technology. I am late to this party. Aira has

been rolling out for some time in the United States. And indeed, we covered Aira in an edition of

The Blind Side Podcast

last year. But since mentioning my Aira experience to people via outlet such as my Internet radio show,

The Mosen Explosion,

I’ve learned that not everyone yet fully understands what the service is or how it works. For those not familiar with Aira, or who would like to read

someone else’s impressions of it, read on.

 

What is Aira

 

According to

the company’s website,

 

Aira is today’s fastest growing assistive community. One tap of a button instantly connects you with a sighted professional agent who delivers visual assistance

anytime and anywhere.

 

Here’s what that means in practice. At present, Aira is a smart phone app, available for iOS and Android. Since Aira is a service for blind people, it’s

no surprise that the app is exemplary in terms of its accessibility. And in iOS, it even sports Siri integration.

 

Using the app, you can connect via video, much like a FaceTime call, with agents who can provide you with visual information. Audio quality is excellent,

far clearer than a standard cell phone connection. Essentially, an Aira agent can tell you anything at all that a pair of functioning eyes can see, plus

perform a range of tasks pertaining to that information.

 

You can acquire the visual information using your smart phone’s camera, or, when you become a subscriber to the Aira service (Aira calls its customers

“explorers”) you receive a pair of smart glasses. These are included as part of your subscription, so there’s no hardware cost upfront.

 

The service is available officially in the United States at present, where Aira has an arrangement with ATT. Aira explorers receive an ATT MiFi device,

allowing them to use the service on the go without the data consumed by the video connection eating up a customer’s own cellular plan. If you have a cellular

plan equipped with the personal hotspot feature, you are free to pair your Aira glasses with your phone using that method. For those with large data plans,

this may be attractive because there is one less device to keep track of, carry, and charge. The downside, other than the data consumption, is that a video

connection to Aira for a long time may cause significant battery drain on your smart phone.

 

When you’re at home, work, or anywhere that Wi-Fi is available that doesn’t require web-based authentication, you can pair your Aira glasses to that network.

As far as I have been able to ascertain, 5 GHZ Wi-Fi isn’t supported at present.

 

Because of the need for high quality video, the glasses pair via Wi-Fi, and not Bluetooth. The glasses are associated with your Aira account. This is useful

if, like in Bonnie’s and my house, you’re sharing your minutes as a couple. More on that later.

 

The upshot of all of this is that for 18 hours of every day, professional, well-trained sighted assistance is just a few taps or a Siri command away.

 

Describing it like this makes it sound kind of cool. But I want to explain the impact that Aira has had on our lives in the brief time we have had it,

to illustrate that, at least for some of us, this technology is more than just pretty cool, it’s life-changing.

 

My first Aira experience

 

If you’ve been reading this blog or listening to The Blind Side Podcast over the years, you will know that in recent times I have come out as having a

hearing impairment. I love going to these big conferences because I get to catch up with old friends and make new ones, as well as see the latest and greatest

technology. I hate going to these big conferences because often, I find myself in difficult audio environments. It can be very noisy. Hotel lobbies and

restaurants are often exceedingly crowded, with high ceilings causing noise to bounce everywhere. The environment is difficult and tiring, but I keep going

and doing the best I can, because the alternative is to sit at home and rust away, and I’m certainly not going to do that.

 

One smart thing that Aira has done is to start rolling out a concept called “site access”. With appropriate sponsorship, or perhaps at times where there

will be many potential customers in one place, Aira can enable free access to a location or even the entire city through their smart city project. There

are two benefits to the strategy. First, it’s helpful for existing Aira explorers because they can use the service as much as they want without it counting

against their monthly plans.

 

Second, anyone, even those not signed up with an Aira monthly plan, can go to the iOS App Store or the Google Play Store, download the app, create a guest

account, and use the service for free. As I found out, it’s convenient to have access to Aira in such situations, and it offers the opportunity for Aira

to convert those guests into full-time explorers. Smart stuff.

 

It was thanks to this program that I gave Aira a shot. Had I been required to go to the booth to give it a go, I probably would have run out of time and

wouldn’t be writing this post. But it was a cinch to download the app and set up my guest account.

 

I first decided to put Aira through a simple test. Having arrived in San Diego after a long journey, I wasn’t taking much notice of the hotel layout when

the porter showed me to my room. So, the next morning, I made my first call to Aira, and asked the friendly agent to guide me to the elevator. Not only

did I get to the elevator effortlessly, I was also guided right to the button for the elevator.

 

But the call I will never forget is the one I made to ask for assistance getting to the exhibit hall while exhibits were being set up. If you’ve visited

the Grand Hyatt in San Diego, you’ll know how cavernous the lobby can sound. When the lobby is full of people, I find it impossible to navigate, because

there’s just so much sound bouncing everywhere. To be honest, I wasn’t expecting much from Aira, but I was keen to see what would happen.

 

This is the moment when I transitioned from the intellectual understanding that “this is quite a good concept”, to the emotional connection that made me

say “holy guacamole, this thing is changing my life!”

 

I’m not a guide dog handler at the moment, but I have been in the past. One of the advantages of working with a dog over using a cane is that you avoid

many obstacles without ever coming into contact with them. The exception is if you are a cane user with good echolocation. I think that even with full

hearing, I would have found echolocation difficult in that very noisy lobby, but it’s certainly not viable for me now. Therefore, in that type of environment,

I often find myself hitting people’s legs with my cane, as I try to find a way forward. With the Aira agent talking in my hearing aids which were also

delivering environmental sounds, I was getting information about where the crowds were, and when I needed to veer to avoid running into people. I was told

when it was necessary to turn to reach my destination and given confirmation that I was indeed heading in the correct direction.

 

Because of my hearing, and the fact that I know navigating these environments can be difficult, I had allowed myself plenty of time to reach the exhibit

hall. But I reached it much more quickly than I had anticipated, and with much less stress than usual.

 

When we eventually reached the exhibit hall, which was some considerable distance away, the agent informed me that the door was closed. I expected this,

since I was heading to the exhibit hall before it was officially open to the public. The icing on the cake was when she said that she could see a counter

to the left of the door with a sign labelled “Exhibit Services”. She then informed me that there was a man behind that counter and offered to lead me to

him. She did so, and he let me in. Astounded, I thanked the agent, and ended the call.

 

Full disclosure, at this point, it gets a bit embarrassing. No technology has made me cry for joy before. But a stressful experience I have to psych myself

up for had just been made effortless and enjoyable. I was utterly overwhelmed. This was all achieved with no more than the free app and the camera on my

iPhone X.

 

Piloting Aira outside the US

 

I’ve no doubt that I would have been wowed by Aira even if I had been blind without a hearing impairment. But, having had a taste of the independence it

was giving me, even better than the independence I had when I was a traveller without a hearing impairment, I really wanted to see if there was any way

I could take this home to New Zealand. I knew it would be unlikely, because Aira is very clear that they are only available now in the United States and

I think parts of Canada. But I genuinely felt that having had a taste of Aira, I would feel a sense of disability if I lost it again.

 

I met with Aira’s CEO, Suman Kanuganti, who kindly agreed to let me pilot the service here. Since this is a fairly glowing review of the service, I want

to be clear that I am paying the same as everyone else. This is not a paid advertisement. And I’m aware of the limitations of using the service here when

it’s not officially supported. For example, Aira is currently unavailable between 1 AM and 7 AM Eastern time. At this time of year, that equates to 5 PM

to 11 PM New Zealand time. That’s a time when we have had a need for the service, but I signed up knowing what I was getting into, so that’s an observation

rather than a complaint. Even for Aira’s existing customer base, I’m sure many hope that this downtime will soon be a thing of the past. I’m one of those

totally blind people without light perception who has non-24 sleep/wake disorder. I’m fortunate that because most of my deliverables can be delivered at

any time, I just let my circadian rhythm do its thing. That means I’m sometimes very productive at 2, 3 or 4 AM. I’m sure there are many Aira users in

the United States in a similar position, who’d value having access to Aira at that time.

 

I’ll also be providing feedback on any technical or cultural issues relating to the use of the service here, should they arise. The most obvious cultural

issue is that many of our place names are in the Maori language, the indigenous language of New Zealand. Understandably, Aira agents don’t have experience

pronouncing them correctly, but that’s no different from listening to the same place names spoken by most text-to-speech engines.

 

When mobile, Bonnie and I are using Aira with our mobile data plans. We share a cellular plan that has 25 GB of mobile data per month, and our LTE networks

are very robust here, particularly in urban environments.

 

Signing up as an explorer

 

Typically, when you sign up as an explorer, you can start using the service right away with your smart phone, and the hardware is shipped to you. Since

I was at the CSUN conference, I was able to sign up online, and collect my hardware from the Aira booth.

 

The ability to use the service as a guest is fairly new, and one of the problems I had was that I couldn’t sign up with the email address I had associated

with my guest account, because the system flagged it as already in use. It would be nice to have a feature within the app that allowed you to upgrade to

a paid account while signed in as a guest. Hopefully that will come in time. The only way around it for now is either to sign up with a different email

address or complete the process over the phone.

 

When you make your first call as a fully-fledged explorer, an Aira agent assists you to create your profile. It’s here that you really start to appreciate

how carefully the services been devised. Suman Kanuganti and his team have worked closely with Blind people, sought their advice, and taken it to heart.

It would have been easy for a service like this to have become patronising. Instead, the culture feels like it is truly a partnership between the explorer

and the agent.

 

As part of the induction process, you are advised that Aira will never tell you that it’s safe to cross the street, and agents will remain silent while

you are crossing. If you are mobile, and the agent detects that you’re not travelling with a cane or a dog, they will disconnect the call. They make it

clear that they are not a substitute for your blindness skills, or for your mobility tool of choice. And they advise that they keep personal opinions out

of all descriptions and interactions.

 

You’re asked if there are any additional disabilities that it would be helpful for them to be aware of. I was able to tell them about my hearing impairment.

 

Rather like when using JAWS, you are offered three levels of verbosity. The three levels are explained to you clearly. Your default level is recorded in

your profile. You can change the default at any time, or for a particular call. The most verbose option will even describe people’s facial expressions

as you’re walking down the street.

 

You’re asked whether you prefer directions to be given as a clock face, or in terms of “left” and “right”. In a noisy environment, it’s easier for me to

differentiate between 9 o’clock and 3 o’clock, than between left and right.

 

Once the process is done, all your preferences are recorded and immediately made available to the agent when you call in.

 

Ride sharing Integration

 

Using the APIs of the ride sharing services Uber and Lyft, Aira can connect to your accounts to both call and monitor your rides. You may ask the agent

to initiate the entire process for you, or you could use the app of your ride sharing service of choice to call a vehicle, then get the agent online who

can see the car you’ve been allocated, and help you watch for its arrival.

 

Some people have safety concerns about using ride sharing services, since you might walk up to a car that you think is the one you’ve called, only to find

its some random person. Having an Aira agent assist you to the vehicle will avoid that.

 

It’s also a brilliant way to catch drivers who speed away because of your dog. An Aira agent can take pictures remotely using the camera you’re connecting

with, be it the camera on your smart phone or the one built into the glasses. This gives you photographic evidence of the driver speeding away.

 

Sharing minutes

 

Recently, Aira introduced the ability to share minutes with up to two additional people. The feature is great for blind couples like Bonnie and me. Inviting

Bonnie to share my minutes was easily done from the app, and she was signed up in minutes, although there was a technical issue which prevented her from

logging in. This was resolved in a few hours after contacting Aira.

 

How we’ve used Aira

 

There is a wonderful section on the Aira website and in its app, with extensive lists of the way that people are using the service. As the father of two

daughters, one use case that both resonated with me and amused me was the explorer who asked an agent to describe their daughter’s new boyfriend.

 

But here are just a few of the ways that we’ve used Aira since we’ve had it.

 

What does this button do?

 

It was wonderful to be able to ask an agent, trained to explain things clearly, how to operate the air-conditioning in my hotel room in San Diego. I was

also curious about a little panel to the right of the air-conditioning unit. After getting me to look at the unit, the agent took a photo, blew it up,

and told me that it was a control panel for the windows in my hotel room. I probably wouldn’t have bothered investigating it had it not been for Aira.

 

Journalism

 

Bonnie has now embarked on a journalism course. Today’s journalists must operate in a multimedia environment. This includes taking their own photos. Thanks

to the technology VoiceOver offers, it’s possible for a blind person to take good photos. When action is moving fast though, it may not be possible to

capture that action quickly enough. And VoiceOver’s camera functions are limited to recognising people. Seeing AI will recognise scenes, but only after

you’ve taken the picture. Aira to the rescue.

 

Just a couple of days after Bonnie began sharing my Aira minutes, she needed to cover a popular Wellington street festival. Bonnie tells me she couldn’t

have done it without Aira. Giving instructions to the agent ahead of time about the kind of material she wanted to capture, the Aira agent was able to

take pictures at exactly the right time and give Bonnie advice about how to angle the camera. Her photography lecturer praised the photos.

 

The agent gave vivid, detailed descriptions of the festival and the people participating in it, which made it easy for Bonnie to write a descriptive, colourful

newspaper story that wasn’t devoid of visual imagery even though she is blind.

 

When Bonnie got the munchies after a hard day’s journalism, the agent helped her locate the food truck she wanted from a number that were at the festival,

and then read her the menu on the side of the truck.

 

Preserving the moment

 

Since Aira can take pictures using the glasses or camera remotely, we recently used it at a birthday party we attended to get the perfect picture for our

own records, and for posting to social media.

 

Compiling reports

 

When you travel and collect receipts, you end up with little bits of paper, business cards from cab drivers with receipt information scrawled on the back,

and big pieces of paper.

 

I’ve become adept over the years at performing optical character recognition on all of it for the compilation of expense reports, but it’s time-consuming.

I took the stress out of the situation and handed it to Aira. My agent advised using the camera on the iPhone X for this task rather than the glasses.

She gave instructions regarding the positioning of the camera, took pictures of all the documents, and I had no doubt that each receipt was fully in the

picture.

 

She put them all in a single document which she then emailed to me. This process took probably a third to a quarter of the time it would have usually taken

me.

 

Transcription

 

As someone who’s been totally blind since birth, I’ve enjoyed becoming more familiar with effective use of the camera and understanding the relationship

between distance and getting the subject of a photograph fully in the picture. When in hotels, I sometimes find getting a good-quality capture of hotel

compendia and in-room dining menus a challenge. The print may have become faded over time, or there’s a wide variation of print types. It can also take

time to work out whether there is print on both sides of the page or not, and sometimes that can vary even within the same document.

 

At a recent hotel stay, Aira took all the stress out of rendering the in-room dining menu accessible to Bonnie and me. The agent very quickly snapped pictures

of all the pages and could see at a glance when the pages were single or double-sided. Then, the agent transcribed the text into a fully accessible Word

document. I was given the choice as to whether I wanted a full transcription, which of course took a little longer, or just a summary of the items on the

menu and their prices.

 

The mysteries of the minibar

 

Many hotel minibars now have sophisticated sensors that charge you for an item when you lift it out of the fridge. Rather than hunt around for a barcode

on each bottle, can, and food item, an Aira agent was able to recite the cans in the fridge in left-to-right order.

 

Real-time audio description

 

Bonnie and I recently took a gondola ride in one of the most picturesque parts of New Zealand. One of our party was sighted, nevertheless, I decided to

call Aira, to ask an agent if she could give me real-time audio description as we rode the gondola, then as we stood on the viewing platform. It was a

moving experience to get such detailed descriptions of the water, the tree line and the city below. Our sighted companion was impressed, saying that Aira

had told us things she wouldn’t have thought about describing.

 

Does Aira harm the accessibility cause?

 

When I’ve discussed Aira with some blind people, a few have expressed the concern that the service may discourage those of us who have it from continuing

to advocate for a truly accessible world. They fear that as providers of information and services become aware of Aira, they may feel under less of an

obligation to do the right thing when it comes to accessibility.

 

For example, if you read this blog regularly, you will know I’ve been campaigning about the code to complete the New Zealand census not being accessible.

If I had been an Aira explorer at the time, an Aira agent would have read the access code to me, and the process would have taken about a minute maximum.

Would I have begun my campaign for the codes to be inherently accessible if Aira had been in our home to do that for me? I would like to think so.

 

A similar concern was expressed when JAWS introduced the ability to perform OCR on inaccessible PDF files.

 

I believe Aira is a pragmatic solution that delivers access to us today. That in no way means that those of us with the skills and inclination to advocate

for a more accessible world shouldn’t continue to do so. If we’ve been able to use Aira to work around the problem, it’s just that, a work-around. Most

of the world’s written information today is born accessible. Someone must take a deliberate step to convert it into something inaccessible, and we must

always object to that occurring. So, we must still advocate for all aspects of life to be as accessible as possible.

 

In this highly visual world, there’ll always be plenty of tasks for Aira to perform, even as accessibility improves.

 

Does Aira erode blindness skills?

 

The arrival of the pocket calculator, the cell phone with a built-in contact directory, and many other technologies have been the cause of people expressing

concern about the “dumbing down” of the human race. A few people I’ve spoken with about Aira have wondered if it will cause an erosion of blindness skills

among its users. I don’t believe so. I contend the impact will be positive.

 

For me personally, other circumstances, specifically my hearing impairment, have made travel time-consuming and exhausting. Freedom of movement should

not be the privilege of the blind elite who happen to find travel intuitive and easy. Freedom of movement is, in my view, a fundamental human right.

 

With the ability to travel under less stress, I believe my travel skills, which may have eroded a little over the years as I’ve begun avoiding tricky situations,

will in fact improve due to increased use.

 

Remember, Aira does not replace your cane or dog. You must still know how to use your cane in a way that helps you locate obstacles and provides you with

clues about your environment.

 

What it costs, and is it value for money?

 

Assuming you have a smartphone, there is no other hardware you must purchase to use Aira. It’s all included as part of the package.

 

The current pricing structure looks like this:

 

list of 4 items

  • Basic Plan. 100 regular minutes a month for $89.
  • Plus Plan. 200 regular minutes a month for $129.
  • Pro Plan. 400 regular minutes a month for $199.
  • Premium Plan. Unlimited regular minutes a month for $329.

list end

 

I believe it is possible to get further discounts on the Pro plan if you pay a year, or even several years, in advance.

 

If you run out of minutes, you can purchase additional ones.

 

You can cancel or upgrade your plan at any time.

 

Whenever a company provides a service directly to the blind community, there are always people who will express concern about cost. Unfortunately, the

economic reality is that the cost of research and development, as well as the overheads involved in running a business, must be spread across a smaller

group of people when providing a service to our community. This equation is made more difficult because so many people in our community are unemployed

and living hand to mouth. Sure, for some people, Aira will be worth sacrificing a few daily cups of premium coffee for, but it’s not that easy for everyone.

 

Some people question whether the service is worth the cost given that there is a free service, Be My Eyes, which connects you with sighted volunteers.

Be My Eyes is a useful service, and I don’t seek to denigrate it at all. I am signed up with it, have supported it since before it went live, and I use

it from time to time. But Be My Eyes relies on volunteers. Some people are so keen to assist a blind person that they answer a call when they may have

been better letting it go. Others simply don’t explain things clearly enough. And yes, there are some who are outstanding. But I equate using Be My Eyes

with asking a stranger for directions in the street. Sometimes you will get somebody who couldn’t be more helpful. At other times you will get somebody

who doesn’t know their right from their left, or just isn’t observant about the world around them.

 

With Aira, the agents have been trained extensively, plus they have tools that help pinpoint your location and provide other data. There’s also a guarantee

of privacy with Aira.

 

I know of people who’ve used Aira to help them sign employment contracts, complete tax returns and more.

 

So, in my view, there is no question that Aira will revolutionise the lives of many blind people if they can afford to access it. This raises important

public policy questions. Many agencies serving blind people will provide funding for sighted assistance to be available on-location at specific times.

Perhaps such agencies fund several hours of assistance each week in the workplace. Other agencies may fund a human reader to visit a blind person’s home.

Aira gives you access to sighted assistance on demand, at your convenience, not at the convenience of the sighted person. This is important because some

tasks may only take a couple of minutes, but they can be show stoppers on the job until we can get that assistance. In a work environment, sighted assistance

on-demand through Aira has the potential to improve a blind person’s productivity.

 

There’s also the social investment argument. If a much wider range of blind people can feel comfortable about travelling in unfamiliar areas, government

investment in Aira could pay dividends by improving employability.

 

Looking to the future

 

Most blind people become blind later in life. And most of those people don’t have smart phones. This group is often forgotten, so it’s encouraging to see

that Aira has been giving them considerable thought. The coming generation of seniors will be more assertive and tech savvy. They will have had experience

of technology in the workplace, and they are willing to spend money to ameliorate the consequences of their age-related disability. However, they may decide

that coming to terms with the blindness specific touchscreen paradigm is just too difficult. Certainly, that’s the case now. Yet I think many seniors would

love to have access to Aira. If they can have an agent assist them to read the newspaper in the morning, describe pictures of the grandchildren or go through

their mail, that’s something many would gladly pay for.

 

The market for Aira’s services is going to increase significantly with the introduction of their new Horizon technology. Currently, to use Aira, you need

at least two things – a smart phone, and the glasses, both of which need to be charged. If you want to use it without eating into your data plan, you’ll

need to carry the ATT MiFi device around with you. That also needs to be charged separately. That’s three things in total that need to be charged.

 

Within the next few months, Aira is promising to simplify their offering significantly. They’ve taken a Samsung Android device, which includes a physical

home button, and developed their own firmware for it. This device is not designed to be used as a cell phone. Rather than requiring a MiFi, the data SIM

will be in this device. The new Horizon glasses, which are much more fashionable and elegant looking, are tethered to this device with an unobtrusive-looking

cable. The field of view is much improved, as is the video quality. That means less need to keep turning one’s head at the instruction of the Aira agent.

With the glasses getting their power from the Horizon device, battery life is massively improved.

 

This all means that someone who doesn’t have a smart phone will fire up the Horizon device, double tap the button, and talk to an agent. Smart phone users

will retain the option to control their Aira experience via the app they’re used to.

 

This configuration also reduces latency and any potential for video degradation. There will no longer be a wireless hop that the video needs to take between

the glasses and the device transmitting the video to an Aira agent.

 

Clearly, considerable thought and capital investment has gone into the next generation of the service. This demonstrates that Aira is continuing to innovate

and thinking about broadening its base.

 

Over time, artificial intelligence will become smarter, and will be able to do more of the things that human agents are doing for Aira explorers now. It’s

therefore sensible forward planning that Aira has begun work on their own artificial intelligence engine they are calling Chloe. Initially, Chloe will

offer optical character recognition, and perform functions relating to the operation and configuration of the Horizon device. I imagine that over time,

Chloe will become more capable. That will increase efficiency for the explorer and reduce overheads for the company.

 

Concluding thoughts

 

Aira’s evolution is an exemplary case study of how to tap into a niche market and create a new, innovative product. Of course, it’s not perfect, but what

is? Sometimes, you can lose cellular coverage when you really need it, causing the connection with the agent to drop. There’s nothing Aira can do about

that other than ensuring they’re using hardware that maximises the cellular signal, and to have a robust protocol in place for seeking to re-establish

the connection. But all in all, the service is fantastic.

 

There’ve been a few phases of Aira adoption for me. The first was hearing about it and understanding intellectually that it was a clever idea. The second

was the strong, powerful, emotional realisation that this could really change my life. The third is the dawning realisation that I’m not imposing on anybody

anymore. Many of us can relate to having sighted family members or friends who we turn to when we need a pair of working eyes, and we hope we are not overdoing

  1. When I first started using Aira, I had a twinge of reluctance about making calls, wondering if someone might need the help of the agent more than me.

Then, one day, it really dawned on me. The people at Aira want me to make the call. After all, if I use up all my minutes, I might buy more. So, when I

make a call to Aira, I’m not inconveniencing anybody, I’m strengthening their bottom line. How wonderful it is to call on sighted help without feeling

like I might be a burden.

 

If you’d like to try Aira

 

Due to the exchange rate between the United States and New Zealand, unfortunately Aira is a little more expensive here than it is in the United States.

Bonnie and I are presently using the Plus plan, at $129 USD a month, which equates to $179 NZD. When the novelty wears off a little, it will be interesting

to see if we need the 200 minutes.

 

So, if you would like to give Aira a try, I’d appreciate it if you’d sign up using our referral link. The referral program means that the person being

referred, and the person who did the referring, each gets a free month. Pretty good marketing. To take Aira for a spin,

activate my referral link.

I hope it makes as much of a difference to you as it has to Bonnie and me.

 

Are you an Aira explorer? What do you think of the service, and what are some of the ways you’re using it? Leave your thoughts in the comments.

 

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