GTT Northern Ontario and Rural Conference Call, Google Speakers and Apps, January 16, 2020

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Northern Ontario and Rural Conference call

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind

 

You’re invited to the CCB’s January 16, 2020 GTT Northern and Rural conference call meeting:

 

Theme: Google Smart Speakers, Home, Mini and Max

Date: January 16, 2020

Time:7:00-8:30 PM Eastern Time

 

Meeting Agenda:

  • Brian Bibeault will demonstrate some of the fun and useful features of the Google Assistant delivered through the range of Google Speakers like, Home, Mini and Max. If you have one join us to share your results and to ask how else it might be beneficial to you, and if you’re not sure whether or not to take the plunge, join us to get your questions and concerns answered. 
  • Brian will also discuss other Google Applications for language Translation and language interpretation.
  • If time permits discussions will also be undertaken for any other iOS apps participants might be interested in.

 

You can participate using the Zoom Conference system by phone or internet from wherever you are:

 

Join the GTT Northern and Rural Conference Call Zoom Meeting from computer or smart phone:

https://zoom.us/j/9839595688

 

Just keep in mind that the below numbers are Toronto based.

 

One tap mobile, Toronto Local:

+16475580588,,9839595688

 

Toronto Local:

+1 647 558 0588

Meeting ID: 983 959 5688

 

For more information contact:

Brian Bibeault, Volunteer Co-Facilitator

GTT.NorthBay@Gmail.com

Kim Kilpatrick, GTT East Coordinator

GTTProgram@Gmail.com

1-877-304-0968 Ext 513

Albert Ruel, GTT West Coordinator

albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

1-877-304-0968 Ext 550

 

CCB Backgrounder:

 

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

 

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

 

 

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.neta

 

 

Windows From The Keyboard Tips, Windows Run Dialogue, January 8, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

 

Windows Run Dialogue

A quick way to run some programs or access specific resources is to use the Windows Run dialogue. Hold down the Windows logo key and press R. This opens the Windows Run dialogue with focus in an edit box. The      edit box will show the command that was last typed into the Windows Run dialog. You may repeat this previous command by just pressing Enter or, since the command is highlighted, you may just type a new command which will replace it. After typing a new command, press Enter to execute it.

 

In this command edit box you may type the name of some programs such as Notepad. Or, you can type the path to a device drive such as c: to open the root of your main hard drive, or F: to open the SD or USB in drive slot F. Or, you can type a folder path name such as C:\Users\Gerry\Documents to open your main documents folder. Or, you can type a web address such as www.cnib.ca to open that specific web page. In all cases, end your typing by pressing Enter.

 

The Windows Run dialogue remembers  the previous commands you have typed so, instead of typing a command, you may simply arrow down to choose from the list of previous commands. When you find the desired previous command, just press Enter to execute it.

 

Unlike the Windows search, which is invoked by pressing the Windows logo key, the Windows Run command will not perform a search. It requires that you type exactly the name of the resource you wish to run. It is useful if the resource name is fairly short and you know it precisely.  Otherwise; the more general Windows key search discussed in a previous tip is more efficient because it will search for matches to what you type including desktop apps, documents, or web sites and bring them up in a search results list simultaneously as you type.

 

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Task Bar – A Productivity Tool, January 1, 2020

Happy New Year! All the best for 2020. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

 

Windows Task Bar – A Productivity Tool

We have devoted several tips to using the desktop to make it easy to open folders, apps, and web sites. However, the Windows Task Bar is also very useful for quickly launching and switching to frequently used apps. You can easily reach the Task Bar in 2 ways:

From the Desktop press TAB multiple times until you reach the task bar, or from anywhere, press Windows Key + T.

While on the Task Bar you can arrow across and find apps that have been pinned to it or apps that are currently running. If you press the Applications key on any Task Bar item, a context menu opens that allows you to do various things such as closing the app, pin the item to the Task bar if it is not already pinned or unpin it if it is pinned. Pinning an item makes it available to launch quickly from the Task Bar by just pressing Enter on it. Or, from anywhere, you can press Windows Key +1, Windows key + 2, Windows key + 3 etc. to launch the first, second, third etc. item in the Task Bar.

 

Office apps such as Word or Excel may be useful to pin to the Task Bar. For example, to pin the Word app:

  • Launch Word so it is running.
  • Pres Windows + T to focus on the Task Bar.
  • Arrow across to find the running task for Word.
  • Press the Applications key to open its context menu.
  • From the menu, select Pin to Task Bar, and press Enter. Word will now be on the Task Bar permanently even after you shut down and restart your computer.

 

This does not mean Word will always be running when you start your computer. Rather, a shortcut to launch it will always be on the Task Bar. If it is positioned as the 4th item on the Task Bar, then simply pressing Windows key + 4 from anywhere will launch it. If you focus on the Word icon on the Task Bar and press the Applications key, you will find recently accessed Word documents listed on the resulting context menu also referred to as a jump list. Simply press Enter on any of those documents to open them in Word. If you later decide to remove Word from the Task Bar, the unpin option is also available in its context menu. IF you unpin it, any remaining pinned items after it will be renumbered. Any time you pin a new item it is always added as the last item on the Task Bar.

 

By default, File Explorer is pinned to the task bar which is very handy. You may also press the Applications key on it to open a jump list of recently visited folders as well as choices to open your Documents and Downloads folders.

 

Pinning a browser such as Google Chrome or Firefox to the Task Bar may also be useful because their jump list will remember recently visited web sites so you can quickly return to them.

You can access the jump list for your task bar icons directly without focusing on the task bar itself by inserting the Alt key. For example, Windows+Alt+1 will open the jump list for the first task bar item, Windows+Alt+2 will open the jump list for the second task bar item and so on. Thus, if Word was pinned as your third task bar item, you could bring up the jump list of recently used Word documents by simply pressing Windows+Alt+3 from anywhere.

 

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Create a Desktop Shortcut to the Documents Folder, December 25, 2019

Season’s Greetings!. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

 

Windows– How to Create a Desktop Shortcut to the Documents Folder

In a previous tip, a general method was provided for creating desktop icons, but Windows also provides a way to create shortcuts through the Applications menu on certain items. For example, it is very helpful to have a desktop shortcut to open your Documents folder. To accomplish this:

  • Press Windows key + E to open File Explorer.
  • Arrow down to your Documents folder but don’t open it. Instead, press the Applications key or Shift+F10. A context menu opens for the Documents folder.
  • Arrow down to the context menu’s Create Shortcut item and press Enter.
  • You will be informed that a shortcut to the Documents folder cannot be created here, and you will be asked if you want to place it on the desktop. This is precisely what we want, so TAB to the Yes button and press spacebar to activate it. Your Desktop will now have a shortcut icon to the Documents folder.
  • Press Alt+F4 to close the File Explorer program.
  • Return to the Desktop by pressing Windows+M. You may want to add the Control+Alt+D keyboard hot key to activate your new desktop Documents shortcut.
  • Press D multiple times until you reach the new Documents shortcut icon.
  • Press Alt+Enter to open the properties dialogue for the Documents shortcut.
  • TAB to the shortcut field and type the letter, D. Just type the single letter D because Windows will automatically add the Control+Alt keys.
  • TAB to the OK button and press spacebar to activate.

The Control+Alt+D hot key sequence has been attached to the desktop Documents icon. Now, to reach your Documents folder from anywhere, just press Control+Alt+D.

 

That’s it for this tip. Next tip is next year. See you in 2020!

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Create a Shortcut Key for a Desktop Icon, December 18, 2019

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

 

Windows Desktop Icon – How to Create a Shortcut key

It’s possible to launch desktop icons by holding down Control+Alt while pressing another shortcut letter. To set up a Control+Alt hot key sequence, select the desktop icon by arrowing to it or pressing its first letter. Then press Alt+Enter. Tab to the edit box that is labelled, Shortcut Key. Press the single key that you wish to use as the shortcut key. Just type the single key as Windows will add the Control+Alt keys. For example, if you have an icon to go to the CELA Library web site, you might type the letter C. It must be unique as you can’t use the same letter for multiple icons. After typing the single letter TAB to the OK button and press spacebar. You are done. Now, to launch the icon , simply hold down the Control+Alt keys while pressing the shortcut letter even if you are not on the desktop.

 

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

Exploring the use of smartphones and tablets among people with visual impairments: Are mainstream devices replacing the use of traditional visual aids?: Assistive Technology: Vol 0, No 0, by Natalina Martiniello

Dear GTT Blog readers.  I urge you all to check out this well done report by Natalina Martiniello and how it impacts the community of blind, partially sighted and deaf-blind people.  You will find the website to be well marked with Heading navigation, so click the below link with confidence.

 

ABSTRACT

 

Smartphones and tablets incorporate built-in accessibility features, but little is known about their impact within the visually impaired population. This

study explored the use of smartphones and tablets, the degree to which they replace traditional visual aids, and factors influencing these decisions. Data

were collected through an anonymous online survey targeted toward visually impaired participants above the age of 18, whom had been using a smartphone

or tablet for at least three months. Among participants (n = 466), 87.4% felt that mainstream devices are replacing traditional solutions. This is especially

true for object identification, navigation, requesting sighted help, listening to audiobooks, reading eBooks and optical character recognition. In these

cases, at least two-thirds of respondents indicated that mainstream devices were replacing traditional tools most or all of the time. Users across all

ages with higher self-reported proficiency were more likely to select a mainstream device over a traditional solution. Our results suggest that mainstream

devices are frequently used amongst visually impaired adults in place of or in combination with traditional assistive aids for specific tasks; however,

traditional devices are still preferable for certain tasks, including those requiring extensive typing or editing. This provides important context to designers

and rehabilitation personnel in understanding the factors influencing device usage.

 

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10400435.2019.1682084#.Xcr3YgJRFKU.linkedin

 

Thx, Albert

 

Sent from my iPhone

CCB Monthly National Newsletter, VISIONS – December 2019

The Canadian Council of the Blind’s National Visions Newsletter for December 2019 is now ready for consumption.

 

For more information or to get on the CCB Visions Newsletter email distribution list please contact Becky Goodwin as per below:

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968

Email: Info@CCBNational.net URL: www.CCBNational.net

 

 

 

Repost: January 2020 is Accessibility Month at SBBC – Small Business BC

For the month of January Small Business BC, Community Futures and Public Services Procurement Canada are offering a number of seminars free of charge to persons with disabilities. Seminars are in-person or via webinar. Just need to follow the link at the end of the below announcement to begin the free registration process. Please feel free to share with anyone you think might be interested.

 

Announcement:

We have partnered with Small Business BC (SBBC) and Community Futures – Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Program (EDP) to make January 2020 Accessibility Month at SBBC.  All of the seminars and webinars in January will feature:

  • Free AIRA Access coverage of the building, so that blind and visually-impaired business people can navigate the venue.
  • Live ASL interpretation;
  • Presentation materials revised to improve readability for those with vision or cognitive impairments
  • Dedicated wheelchair accessible space in the room.
  • Free access to any presentation for anyone who identifies as having a disability (paid for by Community Futures).
  • A “tip sheet” to help presenters make their presentations more accessible. Once it is reviewed by PSPC HQ, we will share with all of the January presenters.

 

PSPC recognizes that there are likely to be lessons learned over the course of the month before we can truly offer barrier-free service. To the extent possible, we will incorporate those lessons during the month rather than waiting until the end.

Attendees can participate in person at SBBC’s Waterfront Station offices or online by registering at Small Business BC: https://smallbusinessbc.ca/article/january-is-accessibility-month-at-sbbc/

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Rename a Desktop Icon, December 11, 2019

 

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

 

Windows Desktop Icon – How to Rename

If you have a desktop icon that you wish to rename simply highlight (place focus on) the icon and press F2. An edit box will open where you can type the new name over the existing name. Press Enter when done and your icon will be renamed. Note that F2 can also be used to rename folder or filenames while browsing in File Explorer.

 

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

GTT Edmonton Meeting Summary Notes, Canadian Assistive Technologies Exhibit, December 9, 2019

            Summary Notes

GTT Edmonton Chapter Meeting December 9, 2019

 

The most recent meeting of the Get Together with Technology (GTT) Edmonton Chapter was held at 7pm at Ascension Lutheran Church 8405 83 Street in Edmonton.

27 people attended.

IMPORTANT: Read the Additional Resources section following the meeting notes to learn about our one on one telephone support, the National monthly teleconference, and the support email list.

Reading Tip: These summary notes apply HTML headings to help navigate the document. With screen readers, you may press the H key to jump forward or Shift H to jump backward from heading to heading.

 

Thank You for Treats

A big thank you to all those members who brought treats to make this a festive meeting to celebrate the Christmas season.

 

December Topic – Technology Exhibit

We were treated to a technology exhibit from Canadian Assistive Technologies, a company with over 30 years’ experience providing assistive technology to blind and low vision Canadians. Company owner, Steve Barclay, exhibited some of the latest tech available. Following is a list of what Steve showed us with links to the product description and pricing.

 

Steve also has some good deals at the Canadian Assistive Technologies gently used marketplace which is worth checking out.

For more information on these or any other Canadian Assistive Technologies products, you may contact Steve at:

(844) 795-8324

Or  sales@canasstech.com

 

Steve’s team also produces a weekly assistive technology podcast which is called AT Banter.

Next Meeting (Monday January 13, 2020 at 7pm)

First hour topic is to be announced.

  • The second hour is for you. For help with technology bring your devices and/or questions.

 

Additional Resources

Telephone Support

Contact our GTT coordinators, Kim Kilpatrick in the East or Albert Ruel in the West to book one on one telephone support.

Kim: 877-304-0968 Ext. 513

Email: GTTProgram@Gmail.com

Albert: 877-304-0968 Ext. 550

Email: albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

 

GTT Blog and Monthly Teleconference

CCB sponsors a national GTT monthly teleconference. You may subscribe to the GTT blog to get email notices of teleconferences, meeting notes from GTT chapters, and other information. To subscribe, activate the Follow link at the bottom of the blog web page to enter your email.

GTT Email Support List

CCB also sponsors a GTT email support list to provide help and support with technology for blind and low vision Canadians.  To subscribe to the email list, send an empty email to:

GTTsupport+subscribe@groups.io

 

GTT Edmonton Overview

  • GTT Edmonton is a chapter of the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB).
  • GTT Edmonton promotes a self-help learning experience by holding monthly meetings to assist participants with assistive technology.
  • Each 2 hour meeting consists of a feature technology topic in the first hour and a general tech discussion in the second hour.

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