Windows from the Keyboard Tips, 10 tutorial Podcasts now available for download, July 10, 2020

Beginner Podcast Series on Using Windows from the Keyboard

Hosted by the Get Together with Technology (GTT) Program,

An initiative of the

Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB), the voice of the blind in Canada™.

 

Basic Windows from The Keyboard Podcast Tutorials

by Gerry Chevalier
GTT.Edmonton@Gmail.com

During the spring of 2020 Gerry presented 10 Zoom webinars on how to use Windows from the Keyboard. If you are blind or experiencing progressive vision loss that makes it difficult to use a mouse, these lessons teach the basics of using Windows without a mouse. The lesson recordings are available on the Canadian Council of the Blind podcast feed. The lessons are not about screen readers. The lessons emphasize Windows keyboard shortcuts and techniques so they will be relevant to both low vision users and screen reader users.

Links to the 10 recorded episodes and show notes are listed below.

If you have additional suggestions for CCB podcasts, please let us know.

Phone: (613)567-0311

Tol Free: 1-877-304-0968.

Email: ccb@ccbnational.net

 

To listen to each of the 10 episodes listed below from your computer or smart device, simply click on the individual session links provided, and PC screen reader users can use their Quick Navigation key B once on the episode site to access the Play/Pause button.  Press the Space Bar to activate it once found.

You can subscribe to the CCB Podcast feed by searching for CCB/Canadian Council of the Blind Podcast on the Victor Reader Stream, or your favorite smart device Pod Catcher.

Happy listening!

Session 1: April 29, 2020

Theme: Intro Session Keyboard, Desktop, Start Menu, Task Bar, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 2: May 6, 2020

Theme: Desktop Shortcuts, Show Notes and Podcast Link.

Bonus Session: May 8, 2020

Theme: Typio Accessible Typing Tutor App, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 3: May 13, 2020

Theme: Task Bar, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 4: May 20, 2020

Theme: Navigating and Selecting Text in Word and Outlook, Show Notes and Podcast Link.

Session 5: May 27, 2020

Theme:  Windows File Explorer, Show Notes and Podcast Link.

Session 6: June 3, 2020

Theme: Windows Recycle Bin and Using External Media, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 7: June 17, 2020

Theme: Internet Browsing, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 8: June 24, 2020

Theme: Microsoft Ribbons, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 9: July 1, 2020

Theme:  Microsoft Backstage View and Save As Dialogue

Session 10: July 8, 2020

Theme:  Microsoft Outlook

How to access and download CCB Podcast Episodes:

PC Computer: all the above podcast episodes can be accessed and downloaded from; http://www.ccbpod.podbean.com/. Here’s how:

  1. Open the episode you wish to download and navigate to the Download Link.
  2. In the Social Sharing section of the page is a Download Link along with the number of downloads to date. First letter navigation from the screen reader’s Links List won’t work to access this Download Link. Down arrow to it and press Enter once found.
  3. In the page that loads you will find another Download Link, and once the links are listed using the screen reader’s Links List first letter navigation will work. Press Enter to activate the function. The podcast will be found in your Downloads folder.
  4. To close the Downloads Page Use Control W, which will take you back to the episode page, and Alt left arrow will take you back to the main CCB Podcast page.

Moving Podcast Episodes to the VR Stream:

  • To move all your above episodes to the VR Stream as MP3 files, first create a folder in the $VROtherBooks titled Windows from the Keyboard Tutorials and move the episodes into it.

What is GTT?

Get Together with Technology (GTT) is an initiative

of the Canadian Council of the Blind. GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision improve their independence using technology.  You can learn more about GTT Zoom sessions and other activities  by following the GTT blog. This site also contains much of the information and more from Gerry’s tutorials in written form as weekly blog posts. Look under the category, Windows from the Keyboard Tips.

 

CCB-GTT Windows from the Keyboard Tips Summary Notes, Microsoft Outlook, July 8, 2020 with a Link to the CCB PODCAST Episode

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

Summary Notes:

July 8, 2020

Theme: Microsoft Outlook

Use the above link to play and/or download the CCB podcast.

Presenter: Gerry Chevalier

Gtt.edmonton@gmail.com

In this 31 minute 10th and final episode of the Windows from the Keyboard series, Gerry discusses Microsoft Outlook. He demonstrates some changes to the View settings to make the display less cluttered for keyboard users. He examines the different Outlook views, mail, Calendar, and contacts. He comments on navigation on the folder list and message list. He demonstrates attaching a file to an email and saving a file attached to an email. He notes some very important shortcut keys for JAWS users for reading message headers. He concludes with a quick look at the Calendar and Contact forms. You may find much of the information presented in these 10 episodes in written form as a series of weekly blog posts under the category, Windows from the Keyboard Tips on the GTT Program blog site.

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators/Trainers:

Kim Kilpatrick 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 513

GTTProgram@Gmail.com

David Green 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 509

AccessibilityTraining7@Gmail.com

CCB-GTT Backgrounder:

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

GTT is an exciting initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind, founded in Ottawa in 2011 by Kim Kilpatrick and Ellen Goodman.  GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision in their exploration of low vision and blindness related access technology.  Through involvement with GTT participants can learn from and discuss assistive technology with others walking the same path of discovery.

GTT is made up of blindness related assistive technology users, and those who have an interest in using assistive technology designed to help blind and vision impaired people level the playing field.  GTT groups interact through social media, and periodically meet in-person or by teleconference to share their passions for assistive technology and to learn what others can offer from their individual perspectives.

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Attach a file to an Outlook Email, July 8, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.
Outlook – How to Attach a Document to an Email
It’s easy to attach a file to an email without using a mouse. Highlight the file you wish to attach using File Explorer. Press Control+C to copy it to the clipboard. Then open your new email window and press Control+V to attach the file to the email. Note that this copy/paste method will not always work if you are using Outlook with an Exchange server which is common in business environments.

CCB-GTT Windows from the Keyboard Tips Summary Notes, Backstage and Save As, July 1, 2020 with a Link to the CCB Podcast

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

Summary Notes

July 1, 2020

Theme: Microsoft Backstage View and Save As Dialogue

Use the above link to play and/or download the CCB Podcast.

Presenter: Gerry Chevalier

Gtt.edmonton@gmail.com

In this 24 minute 9th episode of the Windows from the Keyboard series, Gerry discusses Microsoft Backstage view and the standard Windows Save As Dialogue. He explains how to navigate the Backstage view categories and their associated controls. He also comments on differences between the standard Windows Open and Save As dialogues compared to their equivalents in the Backstage View and explains the standard Save As dialogue controls.

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators/Trainers:

Kim Kilpatrick 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 513

GTTProgram@Gmail.com

David Green 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 509

AccessibilityTraining7@Gmail.com

CCB-GTT Backgrounder:

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

GTT is an exciting initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind, founded in Ottawa in 2011 by Kim Kilpatrick and Ellen Goodman.  GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision in their exploration of low vision and blindness related access technology.  Through involvement with GTT participants can learn from and discuss assistive technology with others walking the same path of discovery.

GTT is made up of blindness related assistive technology users, and those who have an interest in using assistive technology designed to help blind and vision impaired people level the playing field.  GTT groups interact through social media, and periodically meet in-person or by teleconference to share their passions for assistive technology and to learn what others can offer from their individual perspectives.

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Enable BCC field in Outlook, July 1, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.
Outlook – How to Enable the BCC Field
Microsoft Outlook does not provide the BCC field by default. If you want to use the BCC field, you need to enable it as follows:
• Open a new message window.
• Press Alt+P to open the Options menu of the ribbon.
• Tab multiple times to reach the “Show Fields” item and press spacebar to enable the BCC button.
• Press Escape to exit the ribbon and return to your message.
Note that this need only be done once. Outlook will now offer the BCC field on all new messages.

CCB-GTT Windows from the Keyboard Tips Summary Notes, Microsoft Ribbons, June 17, 2020 with a Link to the CCB Podcast Episode

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

Summary Notes:

June 24, 2020

Theme: Microsoft Ribbons

Use the above link to play and/or download the CCB Podcast.

Presenter: Gerry Chevalier

Gtt.edmonton@gmail.com

In this 19 minute 8th episode of the Windows from the Keyboard series, Gerry discusses Microsoft ribbons. He explains how to navigate the ribbons and execute ribbon commands. He also shows how to use the Quick Access Tool Bar, and how to search for ribbon commands and get help using the Tell Me What You Want To Do search tool.

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators/Trainers:

Kim Kilpatrick 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 513

GTTProgram@Gmail.com

David Green 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 509

AccessibilityTraining7@Gmail.com

CCB-GTT Backgrounder:

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

GTT is an exciting initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind, founded in Ottawa in 2011 by Kim Kilpatrick and Ellen Goodman.  GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision in their exploration of low vision and blindness related access technology.  Through involvement with GTT participants can learn from and discuss assistive technology with others walking the same path of discovery.

GTT is made up of blindness related assistive technology users, and those who have an interest in using assistive technology designed to help blind and vision impaired people level the playing field.  GTT groups interact through social media, and periodically meet in-person or by teleconference to share their passions for assistive technology and to learn what others can offer from their individual perspectives.

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Outlook – Distribution Emails and the BCC Field, June 24, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.
Outlook – Distribution Emails and the BCC Field
What is the purpose of the BCC field in Outlook emails? BCC stands for blind carbon copy. The recipients you put in the BCC field will receive your email, but they will not see the names of the other BCC recipients. If any recipient uses the Reply All feature their email will only be sent to people listed in the To and CC fields. None of the BCC recipients will receive the reply.
Using the BCC field is a handy way to send an email to a group of people without the members of the group seeing each other’s email address. You may wish to put a copy of your own email address in the “To” field, so you receive a copy of the group email. Maintaining the group members’ privacy is considered good email etiquette.
If you expect to send frequent emails to the same group, then after filling in all their email addresses, press Control+A while in the BCC field to select all the names you typed and then press Control+C to copy those names to the clipboard. Send your email and then open a new Word document and press Control+V to save those addresses for later use. Save the Word document which now functions as your distribution list.
When you next need to send an email to the group, open the Word document, press Control+A to select all the text i.e., all the email addresses, then press Control+C to copy them to the clipboard. Open your new email and focus on the BCC field and then press Control+V to paste all the names to the BCC field.
Note: Outlook supports a more formal way of creating distribution lists using group contacts and the Control+Shift+L shortcut to use the Group Contact as the distribution list for an email. You can learn more by reading this Microsoft support article.
Note also that the BCC field is not enabled by default in Outlook. The next tip will explain how to enable the BCC field.
That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

Resource: Basic Windows From The Keyboard Tutorial Podcasts by Gerry Chevalier, Sessions 1 Through 7 with more to come

Canadian Council of the Blind Podcast

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

 

Basic Windows from The Keyboard Podcast Tutorials

by Gerry Chevalier
GTT.Edmonton@Gmail.com

During the spring of 2020 Gerry delivered to CCB-GTT Open Chat Zoom meeting participants each Wednesday morning a series of beginner sessions aimed at getting PC users more familiar with basic keyboard access.  To learn more check out the CCB-GTT Program blog at the above link.

The below Windows from the Keyboard tutorial recordings will benefit all screen reader and magnification users as they focus on basic keyboard access to the PC’s operations.  In fact, anyone can benefit from these tutorials even if they just want to reduce repetitive motion strain caused by use of the computer mouse.

To listen to each episode listed here from your computer or smart device simply click on the individual session links provided, and PC screen reader users can use their Quick Navigation key B once on the episode site to access the Play/Pause button.  Press the Space Bar to activate it once found.

You can subscribe to the CCB Podcast feed by searching for CCB/Canadian Council of the Blind Podcast on the Victor Reader Stream, or your favourite smart device PodCatcher.

Happy listening!

Session 1: April 29, 2020

Theme: Intro Session Keyboard, Desktop, Start Menu, Task Bar, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 2: May 6, 2020

Theme: Desktop Shortcuts, Show Notes and Podcast Link.

Bonus Session: May 8, 2020

Theme: Typio Accessible Typing Tutor App, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 3: May 13, 2020

Theme: Task Bar, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 4: May 20, 2020

Theme: Navigating and Selecting Text in Word and Outlook, Show Notes and Podcast Link.

Session 5: May 27, 2020

Theme:  Windows File Explorer, Show Notes and Podcast Link.

Session 6: June 3, 2020

Theme: Windows Recycle Bin and Using External Media, Show Notes and Podcast link.

 

Session 7: June 17, 2020

Theme: Internet Browsing, Show Notes and Podcast link.

 

How to access and download CCB Podcast Episodes:

PC Computer: all the above podcast episodes can be accessed and downloaded from; http://www.ccbpod.podbean.com/. Here’s how:

  1. Open the episode you wish to download and navigate to the Download Link.
  2. In the Social Sharing section of the page is a Download Link along with the number of downloads to date. First letter navigation from the screen reader’s Links List won’t work to access this Download Link. Down arrow to it and press Enter once found.
  3. In the page that loads you will find another Download Link, and once the links are listed using the screen reader’s Links List first letter navigation will work. Press Enter to activate the function. The podcast will be found in your Downloads folder.
  4. To close the Downloads Page Use Control W, which will take you back to the episode page, and Alt left arrow will take you back to the main CCB Podcast page.

Moving Podcast Episodes to the VR Stream:

  • To move all your above episodes to the VR Stream as MP3 files, first create a folder in the $VROtherBooks titled Windows from the Keyboard Tutorials and move the episodes into it.

Who is Gerry Chevalier?

Gerry Chevalier was an entrepreneur and software developer of small business accounting systems for over 25 years. Over the course of his career Gerry became blind due to RP. He has used Windows primarily with JAWS for over 20 years. In 2004, Gerry joined HumanWare as the Product Manager for their Victor Reader line of DAISY digital talking book players.

Now retired, Gerry volunteers as the co-coordinator of GTT Edmonton, a chapter of the Canadian Council of the Blind. GTT (Get Together with Technology) is a self-help peer mentoring group of blind and vision impaired people who use and want to learn more about assistive technology.

For more information, please contact your GTT Coordinators/Trainers:

Kim Kilpatrick 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 513

GTTProgram@Gmail.com

David Green 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 509

AccessibilityTraining7@Gmail.com

CCB-GTT Backgrounder:

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

GTT is an exciting initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind, founded in Ottawa in 2011 by Kim Kilpatrick and Ellen Goodman.  GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision in their exploration of low vision and blindness related access technology.  Through involvement with GTT participants can learn from and discuss assistive technology with others walking the same path of discovery.

GTT is made up of blindness related assistive technology users, and those who have an interest in using assistive technology designed to help blind and vision impaired people level the playing field.  GTT groups interact through social media, and periodically meet in-person or by teleconference to share their passions for assistive technology and to learn what others can offer from their individual perspectives.

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968

Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

CCB-GTT Windows from the Keyboard Tips Summary Notes, Internet Browsing, June 17, 2020 with a Link to the CCB Podcast Episode

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

Summary Notes:

June 17, 2020

Theme: Internet Browsing, use this link to access the CCB Podcast Episode.

Presenter: Gerry Chevalier

Gtt.edmonton@gmail.com

In this 30 minute 7th episode of the Windows from the Keyboard series, Gerry discusses Internet browsing including basic navigation and tab browsing. He covers these topics using the Freedom Scientific Surfs Up web site which he suggests contains an excellent set of self-paced lessons to learn how to browse and use the Internet. Gerry also shows how to copy the address of a web site to another program such as email or MS Word. He then shows how to download a file from the Internet by downloading the installation file for the NVDA screen reader from NV Access. He concludes the episode by showing how to configure the default browser ap using the Default Apps portion of the Windows System Settings.

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators/Trainers:

Kim Kilpatrick 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 513

GTTProgram@Gmail.com

Albert Ruel 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 550

albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

David Green 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 509

AccessibilityTraining7@Gmail.com

CCB-GTT Backgrounder:

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

GTT is an exciting initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind, founded in Ottawa in 2011 by Kim Kilpatrick and Ellen Goodman.  GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision in their exploration of low vision and blindness related access technology.  Through involvement with GTT participants can learn from and discuss assistive technology with others walking the same path of discovery.

GTT is made up of blindness related assistive technology users, and those who have an interest in using assistive technology designed to help blind and vision impaired people level the playing field.  GTT groups interact through social media, and periodically meet in-person or by teleconference to share their passions for assistive technology and to learn what others can offer from their individual perspectives.

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Outlook for Windows – Useful Shortcut Keys, June 17, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Outlook for Windows – Useful Shortcut Keys

Without using a mouse it’s easy to use and move around in the Windows Outlook program.

  • Press F6 to move through the regions of the main Outlook window: the ribbons, the calendar peek, the navigation tool bar, the folder pane, the message list, and status bar. Control+Tab will also move through the regions, but it excludes the ribbons and status line.
  • Instead of using F6 to reach the navigation bar you can navigate those items directly. Press Control+1 to select the email view, Control+2 to select Calendar view, Control+3 to select Contacts view, Control+4 for the To-Do list and Control+5 for Notes.
  • While in any view, you can press Control+Shift+I to focus on the email inbox and Control+Shift+O to focus on the email outbox.
  • While in the email, calendar, or contact view, press Control+N to start a new email, appointment, or contact respectively.
  • While in any view, press Control+Shift+A to start a new appointment, Control+Shift+C to start a new contact, Control+Shift+E to create a new folder, Control+Shift+K to start a new task in the To Do list, Control+Shift+L to start a new distribution list, Control+Shift+M to start a new email message, Control+Shift+P to open the font dialogue, or Control+Shift+Q to start a new meeting request.
  • While in any email folder just arrow up and down to review the list of messages and press Enter to open a message or press Delete to delete the message. Note that you can hold down Shift while you arrow down the list to select successive messages. With multiple messages selected, the Delete key will delete them all. Control+Delete will also delete the message from either the message list or with the message open.
  • With a message open, you can ask Windows to read it aloud for you even if you don’t have screen reading software. Press Alt+H followed by r, then 1.
  • From the message list or within a message, press Control+R to reply to the sender of a message.
  • Press Control+Shift+R to reply to the sender and all other recipients of the message. Note that any recipients in the BCC field are not visible to you and will not be replied to when you use this Reply All feature.
  • Press Control+E or F3 to search within contacts or emails. This is handy to find old emails because you can enter a recipient name, sender, subject, or words from the body of the message to find it. Press Enter after entering the search text and TAB over to the results list.
  • Press Control+F to forward the message to another person.
  • Press Control+Alt+F to forward the message as an attachment.
  • Press the Applications key on any message to open a context menu of things you can do with that message. For example, there are menu items to print the email, find related emails, or open the Junk submenu to block the sender of that email so that any future emails from the sender will automatically go to your junk folder.
  • While in the To, CC, or BCC fields Outlook will attempt to auto complete any email address as you begin typing it. If there are multiple auto completion possibilities, you may down arrow to see the list of possible auto completions and press Enter on the one you want, or press Delete if you want Outlook to forget that email and not use it for future auto completions.
  • While in the To, CC, or BCC fields, you can press Control+Shift+B to open a dialogue that allows you to search your Outlook contacts for a person and then put that person’s email address into the field.
  • You can press Control+Y to bring up a list of your other inbox folders. Arrow down the list to choose a folder and then press Enter to move to that folder.
  • You can move the current or all selected messages to another folder using Control+Shift+V. Choose the destination folder from the resulting list of folders and press Enter to move your message to that folder.
  • Alt+S is a quick keystroke to finish the message you are typing and save it to the outbox. This same keystroke will save the appointment/meeting request you are typing or a contact you are editing.
  • Control+S, on the other hand, will also save the email message you are typing but instead of saving it to the outbox it will be saved to the Drafts folder. This is handy if you don’t want to immediately send your email and you want to save a draft of it to complete later. To later complete the draft email, use the Control+Y keystroke to go to the Drafts folder and there you will find your saved email. Press Enter to open the draft email and continue working on it. Then you can resave it with Control+S or send it to the Outbox with Alt+S.
  • F7 will start the spell checker.
  • F9: If you have configured Outlook to not automatically download messages and to not automatically send messages that are saved in the outbox, then press F9 when you are ready to download new emails and also send emails that are saved in your outbox.
  • F12 will open the Save As dialogue to save a message to a file.

Here is the complete list of Outlook keyboard shortcuts.

Additional shortcuts for users of the JAWS screen reader:

  • When an email is open, you can quickly read its header information. Press Alt+1 to read who the email is from, Alt+2 to read the date of the email, Alt+3 to read who the message is being sent to, Alt+4 to read the cc field, Alt+5 to read the Subject field  (press twice quickly to focus on the Subject field), and Alt+6 to read the bcc field.
  • From any of those header fields, press Alt+` to jump to the message body.
  • Tip: It’s useful just before you press Alt+S to send a new email message to the outbox, to first press Alt+3, Alt+4, Alt+6 to quickly verify who you put in the “To”, CC, and BCC fields. It’s easy with auto completion to accidentally put someone into these fields that you didn’t intend to.
  • Since Outlook email uses the MS Word engine, you can use JAWS navigation keys to navigate the message body. For example, you may press H to jump from heading to heading, or JAWS+F6 to bring up a list of headings, or JAWS+F7 to bring up a list of links. This can be useful for reading long messages such as newsletters where the sender may have set headings or included links.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Microsoft Office Searching the Help Database, June 10, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.
Microsoft Office – Searching the Help Database
When you are in any Office app such as Word, Excel, Power Point, or Outlook you can search that app’s Help database.
• Press F1 to open the Help Search pane.
• Type a topic or question into the search box. For example, in Excel, you might type “how to insert rows” without the quotes.
• As you type your search text, matching search results will appear in a list. You can arrow up and down the list to find the topic that you want, and press Enter.
• Then you can press TAB to find links to more specific information on the selected topic,
• Press Enter to activate the link and open the corresponding Help article which can then be read as a web page.
• Press Shift+F6 to go back to your document pane and F6 from there to return to the Help pane.
That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

Resource: This App Helps Deaf, Blind People Access TV Programming and Emergency Alert

Here’s an interesting piece from CoolBlindTech to serve TV watchers who are deaf-blind.

This App Helps Deaf, Blind People Access TV Programming and Emergency Alert

JUNE 8, 2020 3:31 AM

The DiCapta Foundation, an organization that’s part of the University of Central Florida’s Incubator, created an app to help the blind-deaf community tune into television.

Maria Diaz, a board member for the nonprofit, said she helped start the foundation and created GoCC4All to help the deaf-blind community.

Find the entire article at the below link:

https://coolblindtech.com/this-app-helps-deaf-blind-people-access-tv-programming-and-emergency-alerts/

 

 

Personal Power; The iOS Edition, Getting the Most From iOS as a Blind User by Michael Feir

Hi all.  Here is an important resource for GTT participants who want to learn more about their iOS devices.

Personal Power; The iOS Edition

Getting the Most From iOS as a Blind User

by Michael Feir

Copyright 2016-2020 By Michael Feir

This guide may be distributed freely in unaltered form. It may be altered in order to make the information more accessible to people with disabilities.

Here is a link to it:

https://michaelfeir.blogspot.com/2020/04/personal-power-ios-edition.html?m=1

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Microsoft Office Back Stage View, June 3, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.
Microsoft Office – Document Backstage View
The Backstage view is a useful interface to explore and use for keyboard users.
When you launch Microsoft Office apps such as Excel, Word, or Power Point via a desktop icon or from the Start menu you are placed in the Backstage view. The Backstage view replaces the File menu on older versions of Office. You may also reach the Backstage view by pressing Alt+F. Backstage view has a list of categories that allow you to open or save documents, print documents, export documents to other formats such as PDF or HTML, manipulate the current document’s properties, and more. You select the Backstage category from a list of categories using Up/Down arrows. For each category, there are different controls which you can explore with Tab or Shift+Tab.
For example, the Open category allows you to reopen a document from a list of recent documents or, if you press Down arrow on the Recent tab, you will find other sources for documents such as OneDrive, This PC,and a Browse button. The Browse button will launch the usual Open File Dialogue.
The Info category allows you to protect/unprotect a file, add a security password to a file, or add title or author attributes, add search keywords, and more. Note that adding a document title in the Backstage view is especially useful if you plan to save the document in html format for later inclusion as a web page. The document title will then become the web page title when you save the Word document as an HTML document.
Although the Backstage view is completely Accessible, sometimes it just gets in the way. You may just want to open MS Word and start a new blank document. You can exit the backstage view and return to the document window by pressing Escape. For example, to start a new MS Word document simply launch Word, then press Escape to exit the Backstage view and you will be in a blank document Window. Type your document and then press F12 to save it.
That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

Workshop: braille screen input for iOS Workshop from Braille Literacy Canada and Get Together with Technology, June 20, 2020

Getting Started with Braille Screen Input on the iPhone: Hands-On Strategies for Success

Presented by Kim Kilpatrick and Leo Bissonnette

 

Braille screen input on iDevices is a powerful and wonderful tool. Participants in this workshop will learn all they need to know to get started with braille screen input on the iPhone. Topics include:

  • Enabling braille screen input
  • Using contracted or uncontracted braille
  • Working with braille screen input
  • Typing feedback
  • Braille input screen gestures
  • Important tips for users

 

A detailed step by step overview will be provided with hands-on demonstrations. Time will be allotted during the final portion of the workshop to answer questions and to provide one-on-one assistance.

 

This workshop is hosted by BLC and Get Together with Technology (GTT). It will be of interest to braille users, teachers and parents.

 

Date: Saturday, June 20th, 2020

Time: 1:00-2:30 PM Eastern (10am Pacific, 11am Mountain/Saskatchewan, 12pm Central, 2pm Atlantic)

Cost: The teleconference is free for BLC members and the cost for non-members is $20.00

 

Please note that if you are part of an organization that is a corporate member of BLC, our teleconferences are free for you as well.

 

To register: Send an email to
info@blc-lbc.ca
by Thursday, June 18th.

 

We hope you can join us to learn more about this tool that brings braille and mainstream technology together!

 

Resource: COVID-19 Keeping us indoors, with unique opportunities supported by BlindSquare and NaviLens

COVID-19 Keeping us indoors, with unique opportunities supported by BlindSquare and NaviLens.

 

May 21st is Global Accessibility Awareness Day, focusing on digital access and inclusion for the more than one billion people with disabilities.

Across our globe, the impact of the pandemic is found. Some impacts are led by common sense (avoid exposures, battle all exposures with “be clean” responses), and some by country/local laws restricting travel entirely or by degree.

BlindSquare and NaviLens join to serve on the frontline.

Being stuck indoors.
Has the pandemic created a greater impact for persons who are blind, deafblind, or partially sighted?  Absolutely. These persons now have a heightened need to “be aware” of current locations and planned destinations. They need to know where they are and limit their exposures.

A new opportunity to experience your environment.
BlindSquare and NaviLens, leaders in improving the lives for those who are blind/deafblind or partially sighted, bring you an opportunity to discover abilities and equip yourself in anticipation of a return to a new normal, and to provide you greater independence, comfort, and location awareness with immediate and long term rewards.

BlindSquare is the world’s most widely used accessible GPS iOS app developed for persons who are blind, deafblind or partially sighted. Paired with third-party navigation apps, BlindSquare’s self-voicing app delivers detailed points of interest and intersections for safe, reliable travel. Paired with NaviLens, the app that scans proprietary codes to deliver situational information instantly, this duo offers an unmatched experience for users to navigate independently and more importantly in today’s environment, safely.

While our products have been helpful for our current users, we pondered, why it can’t be great for all during this stress-filled time? We looked for a way to solve this, without cost.

BlindSquare’s reputation, across its 8 years of service, is replete with personal success stories such as those that extoll the value of travel information for making informed choices and the ability to “simulate” future destinations for adventure.  When using simulation, BlindSquare behaves just as if you’re there! And with NaviLens on board  your device, you have access to their award-winning technology to create personal tags that can be used to “label your world” for such things as cupboard content, prescription bottles, fridge contents (including best before dates!), contents of your bar, contents of your freezer, and more. NaviLens is enjoyed by thousands.

So, in co-operation and consultation with many educators and organizations supporting persons who are blind, deafblind, or partially sighted, we have committed to make BlindSquare EVENT (v. 4.9967+) and NaviLens available—free of charge—until November 2020. During this time, free access to BlindSquare EVENT means a full-featured version of BlindSquare for iOS users that is geofenced to the continents of New Zealand, Australia, North America (Canada and the USA), Greenland, Mexico, Spain, Portugal and Japan—well over 25 million square miles! Mid November, BlindSquare EVENT will return to Demonstration mode, NaviLens will continue.

There are no strings attached and no obligations implied by this offering. Our mutual goals are to reduce the impact of the pandemic to you, to provide you with the ability to plan future travel, and to become familiar with the enablement that our solutions provide.

BlindSquare resources

NaviLens resources

Your feedback is welcomed

Please complete this short survey, your insights are important to usCREDITS

In Canada, this initiative is gratefully sponsored by Bell Mobility, additional information and Bell Mobility offers can be found here.

Help us spread the word! Follow us on social media and share your experience with us and with others.

 

 

BlindSquare

NaviLens

Resource: Ten Conference Call Etiquette Tips for better CCB/GTT meetings

Ten Conference Call Etiquette Tips for better CCB/GTT meetings

Have you ever been on a conference call where people become a distraction by forgetting to put their phone on mute, or have sidebar conversations with others not on the call? We all know a few etiquette rules for at the dinner table, but what about etiquette protocol for conference calls?

Here are some easy guidelines to follow when attending a CCB/GTT Program conference call:

  1. Keep track of conference call dates/times. Make sure you know when your conference call is, and be sure to keep the conference call number and pin handy so you are not scrambling to find it at the last minute. Call in to the conference line a couple minutes early and enjoy chatting with others who arrive before the meeting starts.
  2. To know what is happening at GTT and the CCB Open Chat conference calls, register your email address by activating the Follow Link near the bottom of the page on the Blog at GTTProgram.Blog.
  3. Mute your phone when you are not speaking. To help avoid distracting sounds, conversations, or noises that are not applicable to the conference call, the mute button can be your friend. Muting your phone will help you avoid embarrassing sighs, munching noises from eating your lunch, or other background noise. CCB/GTT Zoom conference calls will mostly function with all participants muted, and those who want to comment or ask questions will be encouraged to use the Raised Hand feature.  Meeting facilitators will keep an eye on the list of Raised Hands and will invite participants to engage in the order the hands were raised.
  4. The Zoom Conference system allows you to include your name in the Participants Panel. If you use a telephone to dial into a CCB/GTT meeting, ask the Host to add your name so others can identify who’s on the call.  Ask a CCB/GTT staff member or volunteer to assist if you don’t know how to ensure your name is included.  As Zoom Bombers often don’t include a name in the Participants List we may remove you from a call if unnamed in such instances.
  5. State your name and where you’re from before speaking. Since the conference call attendees are not all in the same room, it is important for others on the line to know who is speaking so that they can better understand the context of your comments.
  6. Be prepared to discuss the topic at hand. Like with all meetings, you should do a little prep work or jot down topics or questions that you would like to bring up on the conference call.
  7. Keep background noise to a minimum. When you take your phone off mute to speak or to get ready to chime in, make sure that you are not distracting the other callers. This noise may be generated from standing outside in the wind, typing on your computer, kids running around, pets barking, side conversations with people in your vicinity just to name a few. It is best to find a quiet location for the conference call.
  8. Maintain a good telephone or Wi-Fi reception. A bad connection often causes static or dropped calls making your input to the conference call hard to understand, in which case you may have to call back into the meeting.
  9. Many CCB/GTT meetings will have an agenda and it will usually be provided before the conference call. Be sure to attend even if it isn’t a topic you need to learn about, as you might be able to assist others in their learning, and bring questions for the Q and A section of the meeting as there is usually time left for general discussion even when there is a topic on the agenda.
  10. CCB/GTT meetings will always have a defined facilitator and technical host. The facilitator will guide the conversation, introduce any presenters, make sure everyone sticks to the agenda and pays attention to time, the host will look after muting and unmuting the call, renaming participants in the Participants List, lowering hands and recording calls that lend themselves to being recorded.

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Web Browsing – Copying Links, April 22, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Web Browsing – Copying Links
Have you ever wanted to paste a link to a web page into an email or document? While you are on the web page press Alt+D to place focus in the address bar of your web browser. The link of your current web page will be highlighted meaning it is auto selected so you can then just press Control+C to copy the link to the clipboard. Now simply go to the text of your email or document and press Control+V to paste the link. Note: If pasting to an email it’s a good idea to press Enter immediately after pasting the link.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

Windows From The Keyboard Tips, JAWS Specific Web Browsing Shortcuts, April 15, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Web Navigation – Using the Keyboard with JAWS
This blog series is about Windows shortcut keys not specific to screen readers. However, I thought it important to devote this one tip to screen reader navigation on web sites because modern screen readers like JAWS, NVDA, and now Windows Narrator provide so much value added navigation that it is critical that you are aware how you can enhance your web browsing experience if you use a screen reader. the following examples refer to JAWS, but some of the shortcuts will work in NVDA and Windows Narrator screen readers as well.
• While on a web page, regardless of which browser you are using, press the letter H to jump forward from heading to heading at any heading level or Shift+H to jump backwards to the previous heading.
• Press 1 on the number row to jump to a level 1 heading. Press 2 on the number row to jump to a level 2 heading and so on. Many well-organized web pages will use a level 1 heading to begin the main content of the web page. Thus, when the page opens, you can jump directly to the main content simply by pressing 1 on the number row.
• Hold down the JAWS key and press F6 to bring up a list of headings on the web page. Arrow up and down the list of headings or press the first letter of the desired heading. When you find it in the list, just press Enter to position at that heading in the web page.
• Similarly, press the JAWS key + F7 to bring up a list of links on the web page. Arrow up and down the list of links or press the first letter of the desired link. When you find it in the list, just press Enter to activate the link. Note, if you press TAB within the list of links, you will find a “Move to Link” button which will position you on the web page where that link is located rather than activating the link.
• Press Insert+F5 to bring up a list of form fields on a web page. You may then arrow through the fields and press Enter on any field to position to that field on the page. This is a useful way to review all the fields on a form before you fill it out.
• Press B or Shift+B to jump to the next or previous button on the web page.
• Press C or Shift+C to jump to the next or previous combo box drop down on the web page.
• Press E or Shift+E to jump to the next or previous edit box. For example, most web pages have a search edit box to allow you to search the web site and you can reach this edit field by simply pressing the letter e.
• Press L or Shift+L to jump to the next or previous list on the web page.
• Press T or Shift+T to jump forward or backward between tables on the page. Within a table, you may hold down the Control and Alt keys while pressing up, down, left, and right arrows to move among the cells of the table.
• At the top of the table just above the first row, JAWS will announce the number of rows and columns. At this point, you may press F8 to select the entire table and then Control+C to copy the table to the clipboard. You could then paste that table into a Word or Excel document.
Press X or Shift+X to jump to the next or previous check box on the web page.
You may prefix the above shortcuts (B, C, E, L, T, X) with Control+Insert keys to bring up a list of that control. For example, Control+Insert+B will bring up a list of buttons on the page.
• Press Control+F to do a JAWS search but note that this will only search the current page not the entire web site. It is a useful way to position yourself to a location on the page where you know certain text exists.
• Press P or Shift+P to jump to the next or previous paragraph and speak it. P is often more efficient than pressing down arrow to read lines on the page because P will read multiple lines at a time that comprise a paragraph. The equivalent Windows shortcut is Control+Down Arrow.
There are many more JAWS web browsing techniques. Freedom Scientific, the creator of the JAWS screen reader, offers a free self-paced online tutorial called, Surfs Up, to help you effectively surf the web using only the keyboard.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.