Windows From The Keyboard Tips, How to Use the Recycle Bin, April 1, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

 

Windows File Explorer – How to Use the Recycle Bin

Have you ever accidentally deleted a file and wanted to get it back? In File Explorer a deleted file is not actually removed from your computer. Rather, the file is moved to the Recycle Bin, so it is possible to restore the file. To restore a deleted file, follow this procedure.

  • Press Windows key + M to go to the desktop.
  • Press R multiple times until you reach the Recycle Bin icon and then press Enter to open the Recycle Bin.
  • You will be placed in a list of deleted files. Likely, your deleted file is in this list unless it was deleted a very long time ago. Also, when you deleted the file, if you pressed Shift+Delete to bypass the Recycle Bin, then the file will have been removed from your computer.
  • You can arrow up and down the list of files to find the file you have deleted. If you know the file name, you may press its first letter multiple times until you reach the desired file. Note that beside each file are details such as the name of the original folder that contained the file and its deletion date. You can read these values with a screen reader by using the right arrow or reading the entire line.
  • When you find the file, press the Applications key.
  • From the resulting context menu, select the Restore item and press Enter. The file will be restored to its original folder on your computer.
  • Press Alt+F4 to close the Recycle Bin.

Sorting the Recycle Bin:

If you have many files in the Recycle Bin, or you cannot remember the name of the file you deleted, it may help to sort the file list as follows.

  • If the current file you are focused on is selected, then unselect it by pressing Control+Spacebar .
  • Press the Applications key.
  • Arrow through the resulting context menu and select the Sort By submenu and press Enter to open it.
  • Arrow through the submenu and choose the sort option you want. For example, you can sort the list of files alphabetically by name, by their original location, by the deletion date, or by the date the file was last modified. You can also choose ascending or descending order.

 

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

Resource: Zoom Keyboard Commands, All Platforms by Ryan Fleury

Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

 

Zoom Conference Keyboard Commands, All Platforms

 

Compiled by Ryan Fleury, Trainer at Canadian Assistive Technology (www.CanAssTech.com.

 

Reading Tip: This document applies HTML headings to help navigate its content. With screen readers, you may press the H key to jump forward or Shift H to jump backward from heading to heading.

 

PC Computers:

Zoom Windows Built in keyboard commands

Available Keyboard Shortcuts

F6: Navigate among Zoom popup windows.

Ctrl+Alt+Shift: Move focus to Zoom’s meeting controls

PageUp: View previous 25 video stream in gallery view

PageDown: View next 25 video stream in gallery view

Alt: Turn on/off the option Always show meeting control toolbar in Accessibility Settings

Alt+F1: Switch to active speaker view in video meeting

Alt+F2: Switch to gallery video view in video meeting

Alt+F4: Close the current window

Alt+V: Start/Stop Video

Alt+A: Mute/unmute audio

Alt+M: Mute/unmute audio for everyone except host Note: For the meeting host only

Alt+S: Launch share screen window and stop screen share Note: Will only work when meeting control toolbar has focus

Alt+Shift+S: Start/stop new screen share Note: Will only work when meeting control toolbar has focus

Alt+T: Pause or resume screen share Note: Will only work when meeting control toolbar has focus

Alt+R: Start/stop local recording

Alt+C: Start/stop cloud recording

Alt+P: Pause or resume recording

Alt+N: Switch camera

Alt+F: Enter or exit full screen

Alt+H: Display/hide In-Meeting Chat panel

Alt+U:Display/hide Participants panel

Alt+I: Open Invite window

Alt+Y: Raise/lower hand

Alt+Shift+R: Gain Remote Control

Alt+Shift+G: Stop Remote Control

Ctrl+2: Read active speaker name

Ctrl+Alt+Shift+H: Show/Hide floating meeting controls

Alt+Shift+T: Screenshot

Switch to Portrait/Landscape View: Alt+L

Ctrl+W: Close current chat session

Ctrl+Up: Go to previous chat

Ctrl+Down: Go to next chat

Ctrl+T: Jump to chat with someone

Ctrl+F: Search

Ctrl+Tab: Move to the next tab (right)

Ctrl+Shift+Tab: Move to the previous tab (left)

 

Zoom Mac keyboard commands

Available Shortcuts

Meeting Shortcuts

Command(⌘)+J: Join Meeting

Command(⌘)+Control+V: Start Meeting

Command(⌘)+J: Schedule Meeting

Command(⌘)+Control+S: Screen Share via Direct Share

Command(⌘)+Shift+A: Mute/unmute audio

Command(⌘)+Control+M: Mute audio for everyone except the host (only available to the host)

Command(⌘)+Control+U: Unmute audio for everyone except host (only available to the host)

Space: Push to talk

Command(⌘)+Shift+V: Start/stop video

Command(⌘)+Shift+N: Switch camera

Command(⌘)+Shift+S: Start/stop screen share

Command(⌘)+Shift+T: Pause or resume screen share

Command(⌘)+Shift+R: Start local recording

Command(⌘)+Shift+C: Start cloud recording

Command(⌘)+Shift+P: Pause or resume recording

Command(⌘)+Shift+W: Switch to active speaker view or gallery view, depending on current view

Control+P: View previous 25 participants in gallery view

Control+N: View next 25 participants in gallery view

Command(⌘)+U: Display/hide Participants panel

Command(⌘)+Shift+H: Show/hide In-Meeting Chat Panel

Command(⌘)+I: Open invite window

Option+Y: Raise hand/lower hand

Ctrl+Shift+R: Gain remote control

Ctrl+Shift+G: Stop remote control

Command(⌘)+Shift+F: Enter or exit full screen

Command(⌘)+Shift+M: Switch to minimal window

Ctrl+Option+Command+H: Show/hide meeting controls

Ctrl+Shift+R: Gain remote control

Ctrl+Shift+G: Stop remote control

Ctrl+\: Toggle the “Always Show meeting controls” options in Settings/Accessibility

Command(⌘)+W: Prompt to End or Leave Meeting

Chat Shortcuts

Command(⌘)+K: Jump to chat with someone

Command(⌘)+T: Screenshot

General Shortcuts

Command(⌘)+W: Close the current window

Command(⌘)+L: Switch to Portrait or Landscape View, depending on

Current View

Ctrl+T: Switch from one tab to the next

 

Using Jaws with Zoom

Pressing Insert W will bring up this list of commands

General keystrokes:

Mute or unmute audio: Alt+A works with nvda

Raise or lower your hand: Alt+Y  works with nvda

Open the Invite window: Alt+I works with nvda

Show the In-Meeting Chat panel: Alt+H works with nvda

Show the Participants panel: Alt+U works with nvda

Move between Zoom popup windows: F6  works with nvda

 

Recording Keystrokes:

Start local recording: Alt+R works with nvda but nothing is spoken as guest you get prompt to aks permission to record from host

Start cloud recording: Alt+C as host works with nvda as guest no feed back

Pause or resume recording: Alt+P works with nvda but doesn’t say anything

 

Video Meeting Keystrokes:

Switch to active speaker view:  Alt+F1: no feed back

Switch to gallery video view: Alt+F2 no feed back

Start or stop Video: Alt+V works with nvda

 

Meeting Organizer Keystrokes:

Mute or unmute audio for everyone except the host: Alt+M: works with nvda but no feed back it worked

Switch camera: Alt+N  no feed back

Enter or exit full screen: Alt+F works with nvda

Gain remote control: Alt+Shift+R not sure if it works with nvda

Stop remote control: Alt+Shift+G not sure if it works with nvda

 

The following keystrokes are available when the meeting control toolbar has focus.

Launch share screen window and stop screen share: Alt+S works with nvda

Start or stop new screen share: Alt+Shift+S works with nvda

Pause or resume screen share: Alt+T works with nvda but nothing is spoken

 

Using Jaws Pressing Insert H will bring up this list of commands

 

 

These are the commands associated with the Jaws scripts included in Jaws and don’t work with NVDA.

To enable or disable alerts, press Alt+Windows+S.

To hear the most recent alert, press Alt+Windows+A.

To be reminded of whether alert announcements are enabled or disabled, press JAWSKey+Tab.

To review the last 10 alerts or messages, press Control+1 through to Control+0. Press twice quickly to virtualise.

To only allow chat messages when pressing Control+1 through to Control+0 press control+F5.

 

IOS and Android

Phone controls for meeting host

If you have entered the Host Key to start the meeting, you will have host controls available to you by entering DTMF tones on your dial pad. To hear all available commands, enter ** on your phone.

 

*4 – End the meeting for all participants

*5 – Lock or Unlock the meeting

*6 – Mute or unmute yourself

*7 – Start or Stop Recording

Note: all participants in the meeting will be notified when recording is stopped or started.

*# – Hear the number of participants in the meeting

99 – Mute or unmute all participants

 

Phone commands available for meeting participants

The following commands can be entered via DTMF tones using your phone’s dial pad while in a Zoom Meeting:

 

Star (*) 6 – Toggle mute/ un-mute

Star (*) 9 – Toggle raise/ lower hand

 

 

Resource: CCB 3-Times Weekly Open House Chat Zoom Calls Expanding to 3-Days Per Week

Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

 

CCB Weekly Open House Chat Zoom Calls Expanding!

 

The COVID-19 pandemic means that we all must observe ‘social distancing’ in order to ‘flatten the curve’ and stem the spread of the Coronavirus.  Whether you are distancing or in isolation, there is no need to feel isolated.  Now more than ever, technology allows us to be more ‘connected’ even when we have to spend time apart.

 

CCB 3-Times Weekly Open House Chat :

Building Community among Canada’s blind and low vision population

Starting on March 27, 2020 for 90 minutes each Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM (Eastern), CCB staff and/or volunteers will host a vision loss and blindness related Zoom call to discuss all manner of adjustment to blindness issues that are on your mind.  All calls will be facilitated.

 

These Open Chat format calls are free of charge and will address a variety of needs.  Connect with us through your landline telephone, iDevice, Android device or computer as best suits your interests and abilities.  Here’s how to get connected:

Join the CCB Weekly Open House Chat Zoom Meeting

https://zoom.us/j/9839595688

Meeting ID: 983 959 5688

Toronto One tap mobile for Smart Phones:

+15873281099,,9839595688#

Toronto: +16473744685

Alberta: +1 587 328 1099

BC: +1 778 907 2071 Canada

Manitoba: +1 204 515 1268

Montreal: +1 438 809 7799

 

Contact CCB Staff:

Toll Free: +1-877-304-0968

Kim Kilpatrick, GTT Coordinator, Extension 513 GTTProgram@Gmail.com

Albert Ruel, GTT Coordinator, Extension 550, Albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

David Greene, GTT Trainer, Extension 509 AccessibilityTraining7@Gmail.com

Brian Bibeault, Volunteer Trainer:

GTT.NorthBay@Gmail.com

 

CCB and GTT on Social Media:

GTT Blog: https://GTTProgram.Blog/

CCB National Office: http://CCBNational.net/fresco/

CCB Facebook: https://www.Facebook.com/CCBNational

GTT Facebook Group: https://m.facebook.com/groups/414313508657159?refid=27

GTT Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/GTTatCCB/

Twitter: @GTTWest @GTTProgram @CCBNational

 

 

Re-Post: Audible just made hundreds of audiobooks completely free – Radio Times

Free audiobooks include novels narrated by Thandie Newton and Dan Stevens

 

Dear GTT Followers, I have clarified what is available and how to access it with this post revision.

 

Audible.com free books.

 

Here is further clarification for my post on Friday regarding the free Audible.com books.  They seem to be mostly for kids while school is in recess, however this is the process for accessing some classics as well as kids books.  They appear to be for streaming only and don’t seem to provide any download links.

 

  1. Go to, Audible just made hundreds of audiobooks completely free
  2. On the page that shows up find the link, audible.com and press Enter.
  3. Navigate to the Start Listening Button and press the Space Bar.
  4. From this page you may search for books, or navigate through the categories and lists available. They are available in a few other languages as well as English.  It seems the reading speed can be adjusted once you begin playing a book, and the Navigation Quick Keys screen reader users are accustomed to will work when accessing this from a PC.  Pressing the letter P will take you to the Play/Pause button, the letter E will bring focus to the Search Edit Field and so on.  Links lists with Insert F7 is another good way to navigate to the books you want.  I couldn’t sort out how to minimize the Player once it is activated, however all other controls can be found below the Audio Player, or with Nav Quick Keys.

 

 

— Read on www.radiotimes.com/news/radio/2020-03-20/audible-just-made-hundreds-of-titles-completely-free-to-help-during-coronavirus-crisis/

 

Thx, Albert

 

Resource: CCB’s GTT “Zooming” Forward through the current Social Distancing Situation

Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

 

  GTT Zooming Forward through the current Social Distancing Situation

 

The COVID-19 pandemic means that we all must observe ‘social distancing’ in order to ‘flatten the curve’ and stem the spread of the Coronavirus.  Whether you are distancing or in isolation, there is no need to feel isolated.  Now more than ever, technology allows us to be more ‘connected’ even when we have to spend time apart.

Blindness and low vision sometimes causes the need for additional supports like sighted guides and visual assistance in our homes and communities, which is greatly impacted by the need to “Socially Distance” ourselves.  In such instances it isn’t just the virus that is isolating us, it’s blindness or low vision that is intensifying the situation.

The CCB’s GTT program is making plans to support Canadians who are blind and partially sighted. We will help you to learn how to stay connected while you ensure your personal safety.  If you need assistance with your technology, this will now be provided through one-on-one telephone training sessions and with weekly 90-minute open chat calls, and through the already-available GTTSupport email distribution list, WhatsApp Group, GTTProgram.Blog site and on Facebook. One-on-one telephone coaching sessions can also be facilitated should people need to learn how to download audiobooks from Canada’s accessible Libraries, or to learn how to get sighted assistance through BeMyEyes and Aira services using smart phones and tablets.  See below for booking information.

 Zoom Conferencing One-On-One Tutorial Sessions:

Starting on March 18, 2020 GTT staff and volunteers will be available for one-on-one telephone sessions aimed at assisting those who want to learn how to install and use the very accessible Zoom Conferencing system on iOS devices, Android devices, or PC and Mac computers.  For one-on-one training sessions contact GTT staff and volunteers as per below.

In the meantime, download the app for your device by following the below links to download the Zoom Cloud Meeting app for:

Zoom For Windows Computers;

Zoom for Mac Computers;

Zoom for iOS from the AppStore;

Zoom for Android from the Google Play Store.

 GTT Weekly Open Chat:  Building Community among Canada’s blind and low vision population

Starting on March 18, 2020 for 90 minutes each Wednesday from 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM (Eastern), GTT staff and/or volunteers will host a GTT Zoom call to discuss all manner of assistive technology and adjustment to blindness issues that are on your mind.  These calls are free of charge, and the topics are open, and will address a variety of needs.  Connect with us through your landline telephone, iDevice, Android device or computer as best suits your interests and abilities.  Here’s how to get connected:

Join the GTT Weekly Open Chat Zoom Meeting

https://zoom.us/j/9839595688

Meeting ID: 983 959 5688

Toronto One tap mobile for Smart Phones:

+15873281099,,9839595688#

Toronto: +16473744685

Alberta: +1 587 328 1099

BC: +1 778 907 2071 Canada

Manitoba: +1 204 515 1268

Montreal: +1 438 809 7799

 

 GTT Audiobook Download Tutorial Sessions:

While in-person book clubs may have been cancelled and libraries may have closed, staying at home means that you have more time to catch up on your reading.  Are you struggling to download audiobooks from your favourite Library; has the volunteer who usually does this for you had to self-isolate?  GTT staff and volunteers can help you learn how to download the audiobooks you need into the listening device you own.

 BeMyEyes and Aira for Sighted Assistance:

If you can’t have visits with people in your community and/or your family supports you count on to get those important things done around home or beyond on a daily basis, and if you have a smart phone or tablet, let GTT show you how to connect with sighted volunteers and staff of these two services so they can help.  Contact GTT staff and volunteers for your one-on-one session to learn how to utilize the free BeMyEyes and subscription based Aira services.

Online Shopping:

If you need to do more online grocery and other types of shopping, and your access to such apps and websites is a struggle, contact GTT staff and volunteers and book a time for someone to coach you to learn the app or website that best meets your shopping needs.  Please be sure to let us know the specific store(s) where you want to shop so the right person can be assigned to coach you.

 Podcasts and Streaming:

Are you finding yourself with more time on your hands these days?  Would you like to learn how to stream movies, podcasts and other forms of entertainment?  GTT may be able to help, so contact us and book a time for a telephone or Zoom coaching session.

 

GTTProgram.Blog Site, for all GTT Events and Activities:

On the GTT Program Blog site you will find postings of all the upcoming events and activities we have planned, as well as some useful resources that might help you to stay connected.  Register your email address on this site and all that gets posted there will land seamlessly in your Inbox in an easy to read format.  If you’re not successful at the below steps, ask Albert Ruel to add you by email at:

Albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

To get started, go to:

https://gttprogram.wordpress.com/

Near the bottom of the page find and click on the Follow Link, type your email address and click on the Submit Button.  That will prompt the system to send you a Confirmation email message, and once you have clicked on the Confirm Button within that message you’ll be registered.  Welcome aboard. 

 Book Your One-On-One GTT Training Session Today:

Toll Free: +1-877-304-0968

Kim Kilpatrick, GTT Coordinator, Extension 513 GTTProgram@Gmail.com

Albert Ruel, GTT Coordinator, Extension 550, Albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

David Greene, GTT Trainer, Extension 509 AccessibilityTraining7@Gmail.com

 CCB and GTT on Social Media:

GTT Blog: https://GTTProgram.Blog/

URL: http://CCBNational.net/fresco/

CCB Facebook: https://www.Facebook.com/CCBNational

GTT Facebook Group: https://m.facebook.com/groups/414313508657159?refid=27

GTT Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/GTTatCCB/

Twitter: @GTTWest @GTTProgram @CCBNational

 

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, File Explorer Useful Shortcut Keys, March 18, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

 

Windows File Explorer – Useful Shortcut Keys

While browsing folders in Windows file Explorer, these shortcut keys are helpful.

  • F2 will allow you to rename a file. Press F2 while focused on the filename. An edit box opens with the current filename highlighted. Only the filename is highlighted not the filetype. Since Windows replaces highlighted text with typed text, all you need to do is type the new filename and press Enter. The filetype will remain as it was. For example, if you have a file named, John.txt, and you want to rename it to Jane.txt just arrow down to the John.txt in your list of files, Press F2, type, “Jane”, without the quotes, and press Enter.
  • Press Alt+Up Arrow to return to the parent of the folder you are currently in.
  • Press Backspace to return to the previous folder.
  • Press Control+Home to move to the top of the folder.
  • Press Control+End to move to the end of the folder.
  • Press Alt+Enter to open the properties of the file or folder you are focused on.
  • Press Delete to delete the file or folder you are focused on. Depending on the properties of your Recycle Bin, you may or may not be asked to confirm the file deletion.
  • Press Control+C to copy the file or folder to the Windows clipboard. You may then move to another folder and press Control+V to paste a copy of the file or folder into the new folder. Note: A quick way to make a copy of a file is to press Control+C on the desired file and then immediately press Control+V to paste it back. Windows will make a copy of your file in the same folder with “copy” appended to the filename.
  • Press Control+X to cut the file or folder to the Windows clipboard. You may then move to another folder and press Control+V to move the file or folder into the new folder thus deleting it from its original location.
  • Press the Applications key (usually just to the left of the right Control key) to open a context menu for the file or folder you are focused on. Arrow up and down the menu to find other actions you may wish to perform on the file or folder such as printing a file or extracting files from a ZIP folder. If you do not have an Applications key, then Shift+F10 is another way to open the applications context menu.

 

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, File Explorer – Searching for Files, March 11, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

 

Windows File Explorer – Searching for Documents

Have you ever lost a file? You may remember downloading the file or saving it from an email attachment, but you can’t remember which folder it was saved in. Likely, it is in your Documents folder or one of its subfolders. To search your Documents folder and all its subfolders, open your Documents folder and then press Control+E to open the search edit box. Type one or more words that you believe are in the filename and then press TAB several times to reach the list of files that were found to have your search text in their filename. Arrow down the list to find your file. To  abandon the search and return to your Documents folder from the search results, press the Backspace key. To open the file’s location (folder), press the Applications key to open a context menu. Arrow down the menu and press Enter on the “Open file Location” item. The folder containing your file will be opened.

 

To search your entire computer’s hard drive press Windows key +R to open the run dialogue. Type C:\ to open the root of your hard drive. Then press Control+E to type your search. This will search all the folders in your hard drive. Again, TAB several times to reach the list of search results.

 

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

GTT Edmonton Meeting Notes, Edmonton Publick Library Accessible Services, March 9, 2020

Summary Notes

GTT Edmonton Meeting March 9, 2020

 

The most recent meeting of the Get Together with Technology (GTT) Edmonton Chapter was held March 9 at 7pm at Ascension Lutheran Church 8405 83 Street in Edmonton.

15 people attended.

Reading Tip: These summary notes apply HTML headings to help navigate the document. With screen readers, you may press the H key to jump forward or Shift H to jump backward from heading to heading. Read the Additional Resources section following the meeting notes to learn about our one on one telephone support, the National monthly teleconference, and the support email list.

 

March Topic –EPL Accessibility

Our guest was Vicky Varga, manager of the Castle Downs Branch of the Edmonton Public Library (EPL). Vicky presented on the topic of Edmonton Public Library accessible services and kindly provided the following extensive notes on these services. If you have any questions not answered in her notes, she is more than willing to get back to you. You can email her at:

vvarga@epl.ca

 

Accessible materials at EPL

Large Print Books, including hardcover and lightweight softcover books. These are available at all Library locations.

DAISY Books are digital talking books used by blind and visually impaired customers and played on a special player. They are different from audiobooks in that the discs are large format and contain an entire book on one disc versus multiple discs as well as a hierarchical structure with marked up text to make navigation easier. Anyone with a library card can request DAISY books online or via a library staff member at any branch.

Descriptive Videos/DVDs (DVS) are movies which describe the visual elements for people who are blind or have low vision. They can be played on any DVD or Blu-ray player. Nowadays, most (if not all) DVDs released in Canada provide this as part of their options. Because of this, we don’t catalogue items separately anymore. The best way to confirm if an item has described video is to go to epl2you and scroll down to where there’s a catalogue link to described video OR search our catalogue for the following: “audio description available”

Assistive technology at EPL

Victor Stratus devices read DAISY disks. The device can also be used to play regular audio books and CDS. Large buttons with high contrast colours.

Victor Stream can have materials (audiobooks, audio magazines, etc.) loaded on to it OR, if connected to the internet, have items pushed directly to it by CELA. The Streams also have internet radio and can have any audio file loaded to them.

EPL has a few of each that can be loaned to customers to provide an opportunity to test the devices to determine if they would be a good fit and to fill the gap while customers acquire their own. If they qualify, CNIB can provide support and grants for purchasing VICTOR devices that will subsidize almost the entire cost.

Home Service:

EPL has provided home delivery since the 1970s!

If you’re unable to come to us at the library for three months or longer, we’ll come to you. We can deliver to your home, extended care facility or seniors’ lodge.

Staff will work with you to select the types of books, movies and/or CDSs you like so we can meet your needs OR you can select what you would like yourself on our website.

You can have a friend or family member pick up materials for you at the library OR we will match you with a carefully screened and trained volunteer who will deliver your items directly to you.

 

 

 

Extended Loans

For customers who can come in, but not too often (i.e. Depend on rides/DATS/weather and/or health often keeps them home)

Loan period is extended to 6 weeks for print items (DVDs remain at 3 weeks).

Talk to a library staff member if you’re interested in extended loans or home service

CELA

The Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA) is a national organization that supports public libraries in delivering equitable library service for their patrons with print disabilities.

CELA provides local library access to Canada’s largest collection of alternative format books and online resources for people who have difficulty reading print due to a visual, physical or learning disability.

CELA offers a collection of more than 500,000 books and more for people who have trouble reading print due to a learning, physical or visual disability. The collection includes:

  • Accessible books, magazines, and newspapers
  • Choose preferred format: audio, accessible e-text or braille
  • Full range of subjects, genres, best sellers and award winners for all ages

Access to the CELA collection is restricted to people with print disabilities living in Canada.

A print disability is a learning, physical or visual disability that prevents a person from reading conventional print.

More specifically, a print disability can be a:

  • Learning disability: An impairment relating to comprehension
  • Physical disability: The inability to hold or manipulate a book
  • Visual disability: Severe or total impairment of sight or the inability to focus or move one’s eyes

This definition of print disability is from the Canadian Copyright Act because it is this Act that lets CELA reproduce published materials in alternative formats for its collection. The term used in the Act is “perceptual disability”.

How to read CELA material

Download books to your mobile device and read with an accessible reading app like Dolphin EasyReader. Dolphin EasyReader is a FREE accessible reading app designed for readers with dyslexia, low vision or blindness. It’s what is recommended by CELA, but there are other apps that can be used including some paid apps.

Download or have books downloaded direct to a DAISY player over a wireless connection. Books can be chosen on the CELA website and downloaded to DAISY players, but CELA can  also push books directly to DAISY or Victor Stream devices if they’re connected to the internet.

 

Receive audio (DAISY) or braille by mail. DAISY disks and braille books can also be mailed via Canada Post directly to customers. Braille books and DAISY magazines and newspapers are theirs to keep, but books have a return mail label included and must be shipped back.

Bookshare via CELA

Bookshare is a US-based accessible online library for people with print disabilities. Bookshare offers more than 500,000 titles, including books for all ages, best sellers, and more. The books are available in e-text and e-braille. Audio versions are in synthetic speech.

Bookshare creates its accessible books by automatically converting book files provided by publishers. This automatic process makes large numbers of books available quickly and in a wide variety of accessible formats. However, because humans do not check the books, you may find errors in the synthetic audio or computer-generated braille. In addition, books which rely heavily on illustrations, charts, and graphs may not be usable because this material is generally presented by the publishers as images which cannot be converted automatically.

Proof of Disability: If you wish to access the Bookshare collection, you must provide a proof of disability, as required by Bookshare’s agreements with publishers. CELA manages the proof of disability process and ensures the privacy of your personal information. If you prefer not to submit a proof of disability, you will still have access to the CELA collection.

Signing up for CELA

Visit CELA Registration Page or contact the library for assistance.

What students/individuals need to register:

  • EPL library card
  • You must have a print disability to use CELA services, but proof of disability is not required

CELA Educator Access

If you’re an educator supporting a student with a print disability, receive free access to CELA’s entire collection including Bookshare!

How do you register? Get a free library card from Edmonton Public Library then complete the online Educator Access Program Registration Form: educators.celalibrary.ca/

CELA’s Client Access Support 

CELA’s Client Access Support program is designed for professionals who require access to CELA’s collection in order to assist individuals with print disabilities.

For example, if you work with students (being privately tutored), CNIB clients, residents of seniors’ residences or long-term care facilities, or those whose physical disabilities prevent them from manipulating a traditional book you could be eligible to access CELA’s alternate format collection on behalf of those you support.

 

What does CELA Client Access Support include?

The Client Access Support program provides access to CELA’s physical format collection including books on CD, braille books, descriptive video; our online formats such as downloadable DAISY audio or text; and electronic braille files available at celalibrary.ca.

Bookshare? No… Access to Bookshare is limited to educational institutions and to individuals with print disabilities who are registered for CELA. If you are working with individuals with print disabilities who want access to Bookshare’s online resources, you can assist them in adding the Bookshare membership to their CELA account.

Client Access Support accounts are valid until October 1 of the next year. Accounts approved on or after October 1 will expire on Oct 15 of the following year. CELA will send you a renewal notice.

National Network for Equitable Library Access (NNELS)

NNELS is funded by 8 separate provincial governments and is sustained and run by public libraries. Their goals are:

  1. accessible public library service for everyone;
  2. accessible publishing and distribution so that separate collections like ours are no longer required for access to books and reading.

NNELS is an online public library of 10,000+ titles in accessible formats. The most common formats are DAISY, PDF and e-text.

NNELS not only provides access to existing accessible books, but it also supports the creation of accessible versions of titles.

NNELS is unique in that it works closely with publishers and distributors to promote accessible formats, but it also supports the creation of accessible versions of titles as needed. Sometimes this means supporting local libraries in creating their own accessible versions – Lac La Biche just finished recording an audio version of a local collection of stories. Many Indigenous and locally-written material is not available in an accessible format and NNELS is working to combat this issue

Signing up for NNELS

To register for NNELS, individuals only need to contact the library. Library staff will change their membership to include NNELS.

Your library card number and PIN can then be used to access the NNELS catalogue on their website: http://nnels.ca

 

Next Meeting (Monday April 13 at 7pm)

  • Topic TBA.
  • As always, for help with technology bring your devices and/or questions to the meeting.

 

Additional Resources

Telephone Support

Contact our GTT coordinators, Kim Kilpatrick in the East or Albert Ruel in the West to book one on one telephone support.

Kim: 877-304-0968 Ext. 513

Email: GTTProgram@Gmail.com

Albert: 877-304-0968 Ext. 550

Email: albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

 

GTT Blog and Monthly Teleconference

CCB sponsors a national GTT monthly teleconference. You may subscribe to the GTT blog to get email notices of teleconferences, meeting notes from GTT chapters, and other information. To subscribe, activate the Follow link at the bottom of the blog web page to enter your email.

GTT Email Support List

CCB also sponsors a GTT email support list to provide help and support with technology for blind and low vision Canadians.  To subscribe to the email list, send an empty email to:

GTTsupport+subscribe@groups.io

 

GTT Edmonton Overview

  • GTT Edmonton is a chapter of the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB).
  • GTT Edmonton promotes a self-help learning experience by holding monthly meetings to assist participants with assistive technology.
  • Each 2 hour meeting consists of a feature technology topic in the first hour and a general tech discussion in the second hour.

[End]

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, File Explorer – Folder Options, March 4, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

 

Windows File Explorer – Folder Options

The following are suggested settings for the folder options of your computer’s file system. I believe setting these folder options will make browsing files on your computer safer and easier especially if you do not use a mouse.

  • Begin by opening the Documents folder.
  • Press Control+Spacebar to ensure no files are selected in the Documents folder.
  • Press the Applications key which is beside the right control key on most keyboards. Shift+F10 can also be used if you don’t have an Applications key. Pressing Applications key will open a context menu for the folder.
  • The first item on the menu should be View submenu. Press Right Arrow to open the View submenu and arrow down to the Details item and press Enter if Details is not checked. The details view mode ensures your files are listed in a vertical list with details such as date modified and file size displayed beside each file. The icon view modes are more difficult to use because they are shown in a grid meaning you must arrow in all four directions to browse the files in a folder. For keyboard users, it’s easier to display the files in the vertical details list so you only need to browse in an up/down direction.
  • After you have pressed Enter to check the Details view mode you will be returned to your Documents folder. Press the Applications key to again open the folder context menu.
  • Press Enter to check the Name choice. This causes the files to be listed alphabetically by name.
  • Now press the Windows logo key to open the Windows Start Menu search box and type “folder options” without the quotes in the search box. “File Explorer Folder Options Control Panel” should appear in the search results. Press Enter to open it.
  • TAB through the general and View tabs setting the items of interest. In the General Tab be sure to choose “This PC” as the default place for File Explorer to open. Also, in the Advanced Settings tree view of the View tab be sure the item to “hide known file extensions” is off. You press spacebar to toggle the on/off status. This ensures filetypes such as txt, DOCX, MP3 etc. will appear in your list of files.

 

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

Resource: How to Turn off Save Log-ins and Passwords in Firefox

In order to stop Firefox from asking you to save your log-in and password each time you log into a website, do the following.

 

        1. Alt + T to open the Tools Menu.
  1. Press the letter O, or Up Arrow once to Options and press Enter.
  2. In the List View Down Arrow to Privacy and Security, then Tab through the Dialog Box until you find, Log-ins and Passwords – Ask to Save Log-ins and Passwords for Websites. Press the Space Bar to uncheck the Check Box.
  3. To close the Dialog Box hold down the Control Key and press the letter W.