Guest Post: Albert Ruel’s Must Have Blindness Related Assistive Tech Podcasts, January 23, 2019

Albert Ruel’s Must Have Blindness Related Assistive Tech Podcasts

 

To stay in touch with the blind world of accessible and assistive technology I refer frequently to the following list of podcasters.  Some I go to just to hear what’s new, what’s coming, what does or doesn’t work, and some I go to when I want to learn how to do a task, set-up a device or how to use an app.  Either way, these are my go-to podcasts for your consideration.  Please don’t think that you have to agree, and if you have others I haven’t included in this list please share them and I’ll be happy to see whether or not they fit in my life and/or learning style.  The list is alphabetical and not by importance.

 

  1. Accessibility Moving Forwards Podcast, for interesting interviews and assistive technology presentations.
  2. Airacast with Jonathan Mosen, for interviews, Agent and Explorer features and news about Aira.
  3. AMI Audio Live, for blindness related radio programs on AMI Audio.
  4. AppleVis, for learning how to, and for the news related to all things Apple.
  5. AT Banter Podcast by Canadian Assistive Technology, which consists of interviews with interesting people in the blind and multi-disabled assistive tech worlds.
  6. Blind Abilities, for learning how to, and for the news related to all things assistive tech.
  7. Blind Bargains Audio, for learning how to, and for the news related to all things assistive tech.
  8. CNIB, Blind Wide Open Podcast, for presentations and interviews about blindness. Kim Kilpatrick was featured on January 8, 2019 talking about GTT.
  9. CNIB, Venture Zone Podcast, which seems to be interviews with blind entrepreneurs
  10. Comments On, Blind Vet Tech Quick Guides, for learning how to use all manner of apps and devices.
  11. Cool Blind Tech, it has over 400 episodes available, and appears to not have added anything new since August 2018.
  12. Double Tap, an AMI Audio Show dedicated to blindness assistive tech interviews.
  13. iHabilitation by Tom Dekker, which is an iOS training podcast offering paid training sessions along with some free episodes.
  14. Kelly and Company, an AMI Audio program that features some assistive tech segments, local reporting and other blindness related interviews.
  15. Main Menu, ACB Radio, for the news related to all things assistive tech and blindness.
  16. Mystic Access, for free tutorials, helpful hints and news about the online and home-study courses they sometimes offer.
  17. Parallel, Relay FM, an interview podcast featuring many experts and innovators in the blind/tech world by Shelly Brisban. She is the author of the series of books titled, iOS Access for All, and is herself vision impaired.
  18. RNIB Tek Talk, for news on the blind assistive tech world.
  19. Seminars at Hadley, for hour long presentations, discussions and interviews related to assistive tech.
  20. TedTalks, consisting of several separate podcasts related to Education, Health, News and Politics, Society and Culture, and Technology, which all must be searched for and subscribed to individually.
  21. The Canadian Council of the Blind Podcast, just because I have a couple of episodes on there, and the CCB Health and Fitness program has many more than that.
  22. The Tech Doctor Blog and Podcast, which posts new episodes infrequently, and that is very good, all-be-it completely Apple ecosystem based.
  23. Victor Reader Stream Information, which is infrequently updated with new material.
  24. Woodbridge, David, iSee – Using various technologies from a blind person’s perspective, for learning how to use many apps and devices.

 

Thx, Albert

 

 

Resource: artificial intelligence technologies is seeking Testers using Android Devices

Hey friends,

 

We are an MIT-based startup that’s developing artificial intelligence technology for the visually impaired and the blind. We have recently released a test version of our first app on Android. It is very different from any of the existing apps such as Envision or SeeingAI. It helps you locate empty chairs, doors, stairs, and other objects around you, by using cutting-edge artificial intelligence.

 

We are accepting a limited number of tech-savvy people to try the app out before it is released and become a tester for artificial intelligence technologies. If you are interested, you can follow this link:

 

Google Play Store link

 

I am looking forward to hearing your feedback.

 

Best,

 

Emre Sarbak

Mediate

 

Resource: Audible App, Deleting books on iPhone 6 Running iOS 11-4-1

Deleting books in the Audible App on iPhone 6 in iOS 11-4-1

  1. With the My Library Tab at the bottom left corner of the main Audible Player screen selected, and Device selected near the top of the screen the iPhone will list the books on the device.
    2. Flick right several times from the top of the page to find the Delete Button icon and one-finger double tap it. Now, each book in the list will have something appear just before the title labelled, Delete from Device.
    3. Flick with one finger through the list to find the book title to be deleted and flick once to the left to access the Delete From Device Button pertaining to that book. One-finger double tap that button to start the deletion process.
    4. Focus will remain on the Delete From Device icon just activated, and above it will be found another button with the same label. Flick once to the left to locate that one and one-finger double tap it to finalize the deletion of the book.
    5. If there are multiple books to delete repeat steps 3 and 4.
    6. To turn off the Deletion process go back to the top of the page then flick right to locate the Delete Button and one-finger double tap it. The list of books wil return to its original state.

 

Guest Post: Works of art reimagined by Francine Kopun The Toronto Star

Works of art reimagined

OCAD University students rework a selection of AGO paintings into hands-on art the visually impaired can appreciate

 

Francine Kopun

The Toronto Star, Jan. 4, 2019

 

Peter Coppin remembers the discussion with a visually impaired student that helped him understand how much can be misunderstood when a person has to depend on words to understand what someone else can see.

 

They were talking about Italy and the student knew that Italy is shaped like a boot. But when Coppin described it as a boot with a high heel like the Three Muskateers would wear, the student laughed out loud. He had been envisioning Italy as an entirely different kind of boot shape and the idea of Italy as a Muskateer boot was comical to him.

 

It’s these chasms in understanding that Coppin and the Art Gallery of Ontario are trying to bridge with a program that brings multisensory projects, based on works of visual art, to AGO museum tours for people in the blind and low vision community.

 

While in the past museums have relied heavily on audio recordings and guides to bridge that gap, new practices are being brought on board, including multisensory aids designed by graduate students at OCAD University.

 

“Visuals are dominant in our culture. If you are a part of society and you don’t have access to visual items, then you don’t have access to a lot of  stuff about the culture that people who have vision have access to,” says Coppin, associate professor of the inclusive design graduate program and director of the perceptual artifacts lab at OCAD University.

 

In Coppin’s graduate class, students select a work of art at the AGO to interpret for people living with vision loss.

 

This year – the second year of the program – the works included four paintings: Tom Thomson’s The West Wind, Otto Dix’s Portrait of Dr. Heinrich Stadelmann; La Demoiselle de magasin by James Tissot and Jar of Apricots by Jean-Siméon Chardin.

 

In a way, it’s about getting back to the roots of what museums used to be, said Melissa Smith, co-ordinator of the gallery guide, adult education officer and access to art programs for the AGO.

 

Early museums began as private collections, typically belonging to the wealthy, who would share art and artifacts they had purchased or collected on their travels. They were displayed in “wonder rooms.” People were allowed to touch the items as part of the experience.

 

The AGO already offers multisensory tours for people living with vision loss, which include some works that can be touched – including the museum’s large Rodin sculptures – under supervision, but providing 3-D support for works of visual arts offers the possibility of evoking more than just the sense of touch.

 

For months, Coppin’s students grappled with the idea of how to render the terrifying look on Dr. Stadelmann’s face into a tactile experience and how to communicate the cold of the water in The West Wind.

 

“We were totally drawn to this portrait; the eerie atmosphere,” said student Shannon Kupfer, speaking of the Dix portrait. “I was dying to interpret it.”

 

Dix layered paint on the doctor’s eyes – they appear to bulge. He seems haunted. His hands are in fists by his sides. Kupfer and her partner, Tyson Moll, wanted viewers to feel that tension, and also feel the deep wrinkles in his face.

 

They made a 3-D replica of the doctor’s head in polymer clay that felt cold and a bit yielding, but still firm to the touch. The eyes bulge like they do in the painting.

 

They sewed hair onto his head in little batches, to mimic the strokes of the paintbrush in the painting. They made the body boxy and rigid, to communicate the physical tension in the painting. They gave him a rigid collar, backed by cardboard. His fists were made of polymer clay coated in silicone.

 

They also made it out of products that were easy to care for – the clothes are fastened with Velcro to make it easier for curators to remove them and wash them if necessary.

 

They recorded an audio component – a fluent German speaker reading a passage from one of Dr. Stadelmann’s writings, concerning avant-garde art in relation to what was then considered psychiatric wisdom. They included the hissing noise that used to accompany recordings played on records.

 

“It’s not just engaging for the low-sight community, it’s engaging for everyone. It’s such a cool way to get kids – or anyone – more engaged with art,” Kupfer said.

 

The problem of communicating the coldness of the water in Tom Thomson’s piece was solved more simply, with a bag of blue slime. To convey the feeling of wind, the students invested in a $20 miniature fan from Amazon.com.

 

“When you stand in front of this painting you can feel the strong wind because of the shape of the tree and the waves on the lake,” said student Norbert Zhao.

 

John Rae, who lost his eyesight in his 20s and is now blind, has been on the AGO multisensory tours and experienced the works made by this year’s OCAD students. While he liked the Otto Dix sculpture, some things didn’t communicate as planned. For example, without knowing anything about the painting, when Rae touched the sculpture, he thought the doctor was a boxer wearing gloves, because of the way the hands felt. “That comes from me as a sports fan,” said Rae, a retired public servant and a board member of the Alliance for Equality of Blind Canadians.

 

Rae liked the multisensory adaptation of Jar of Apricots, by students Nikkie To and Grace Mendez. The painting is a still life that includes a jar of apricots, a glass of wine, bread and a cup of tea.

 

Their model included dried apricots for tasting, jarred scents including a cork soaked in wine and apricot jam with added artificial apricot scent; 3-D printed objects including a tea cup and wine glass to handle, background music from the period and others sounds – touching the wine glass triggered the sound of a liquid being poured.

 

While Rae believes the multisensory aids provide another tool, he thinks museums in general need to consider making more objects available for handling by the blind and vision impaired. He cited as an example ancient pottery – while a museum may have perfect examples on display, it may also have imperfect examples in storage. What would be the harm, asks Rae, in making those available to people with limited eyesight, especially since the tours happen infrequently, involve about six to 12 items, and small numbers of people?

 

“One can learn a fair amount from the expertise that the people who run these tours bring to the table, but there is no substitute for being able to touch,” Rae said.

 

The challenge at the AGO, Smith said, is that in an art gallery the works tend to be flat and one-of-a-kind.

 

“Our conservators and curators do their utmost to ensure the objects, like sculptures, which make the most interesting objects to touch, are cared for and exhibited to support this program,” Smith said.

 

Ian White, president of a local Toronto chapter of the Canadian Council of the Blind called the CCB Toronto Visionaries, said that while AGO tour leaders excel at describing art in a way that triggers the imagination, the multisensory tours are evocative.

 

“It starts a conversation about the piece, about the artist, about the history,” White said.

 

“It really allows people to engage with works that are part of our collective culture.”

 

 

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Scams and Scammers, December 31, 2018

December 31 2018

 

Happy holidays everyone!

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I am going to do something a bit different and as we get ready to welcome in 2019 I am going to give you some great pointers for avoiding scams and scammers.

I have gathered these through investigations, hard core experiences, and input from others.

 

Here goes.

You need to remember that scams come in the following formats:

As emails, as phone calls both recorded and via a live caller, and o yes!  It can even show up at your door and in your mailbox.

And now they are targeting us through texts being sent to our cell phones.

 

Do not respond to emails that look strange to you.

Do not download attachments from unknown senders.

Do not share your username and password to your online banking and any other online payments facilities with anyone.

Do not give out any banking or personal details on the phone to unknown callers.

Do not pay any attention to threats from automated phone recordings or from live persons with regard to your credit card or that you owe money to any revenue agency.

Do not entertain any offers either via email or by phone from senders and callers offering incredible service packages as they may pertain to cable and tv services, prizes that you have won, or any sort of any type of service package.

Do not answer the door to unknown callers.

Take extra caution to make sure that the details of your credit cards and debit cards are fully protected when you make payments at restaurants or at stores, pharmacies, and elsewhere.

Do not enter your password for Facebook or Twitter in response to a text request on your cell phone.

The same if you are asked for your Apple ID.

Do not fall prey to a text message telling you that your banking details have been compromised online.

 

That’s it from me for this week.

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

Now you  can subscribe to “‘Let’s Talk Tips”‘ which is my monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,

Business, and Advocacy.

http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

 

 

 

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Raised Line Drawing Board, December 24, 2018

December 24 2018

Meet the raised line drawing board

 

Happy holidays everyone!

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about the raised line drawing board.

 

Meet the raised line drawing board

 

I got introduced to this gem a few months ago and it is a perfect goodie for those kids who are interested in drawing their very own pictures.  It is a perfect way for anyone who is blind to use their imagination to put pen to paper so to speak.

 

How does this goodie work?  Well, it is just an 8 and a half by 11 board.  Place your sheet of paper on this board and then use any ball point pen to do the rest.  When you draw you can then feel how it comes out on the sheet of paper.  It comes out in raised format for you to feel.

 

Quite a very interesting goodie; good for all ages.  So go out there and make friends with the raised line drawing board.

 

 

That’s it from me for this week.

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

Now you  can subscribe to “‘Let’s Talk Tips”‘ which is my monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,

Business, and Advocacy.

http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

 

 

 

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, A scam alert, December 17, 20187

December 17 2018

A scam alert

 

Happy holidays everyone!

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to introduce you to my scam alert.

 

A scam alert

Better not to answer your door to the unknown person

 

These types of scammers come in all age groups and with limitless types of requests.  Now it is up to you to use your judgement and go with your gut instinct.

 

They could be anyone from the youngest to the oldest.

They could be selling small appliances and electronics.

They could be insurance sales persons.

They could be someone offering to do your taxes.

 

Just remember!  These types of scammers do not have a specific age.  Adults often use children to help them carry out their unhealthy deeds.

 

What’s the risk of opening your door to an unknown caller?

You take your future and your life into your hands.

 

Until next week then!

 

 

That’s it from me for this week.

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

Now you  can subscribe to “‘Let’s Talk Tips”‘ which is my monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,

Business, and Advocacy.

http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

 

 

Canadian Council of the Blind/GTT $10/Annual Membership Dues for the Year 2019 Are Now Due

December 12, 2018

 

Attention GTT-CCB Participants and Members in Western Canada:

 

Subject: Canadian Council of the Blind $10/Annual Membership Dues for the Year 2019 Are Now Due

 

Dear GTT Participants and Members.  The end of 2018 is fast approaching and a New Year is just around the corner, so I am tasked with the duty of collecting as many membership dues as I can for the GTT Vancouver, Victoria a Nanaimo Chapters.  This call to action is also directed at those who participate in other GTT activities and events like GTTSupport Email List, GTT National Conference Call and the GTTProgram Blog.  If you belong to any other CCB Chapter and have paid your dues through your Chapter as is best done, we thank you for that.

 

As the Get Together with Technology program (GTT) is an initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind, that is the organization to which we submit our annual dues.  So, if you have participated in any of the above noted Chapters, events or activities and wish to re-new, or to establish your CCB membership for the first time please check in with me directly.  You can E-Transfer or Interac $10 to my work email address, or I can be reached at that address and will be happy to make arrangements as best suit you.  Please call or email if you have any questions.

 

Albert Ruel, GTT Coordinator

iPhone: +1-250-240-2343 (call or text:

Albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

 

In order to complete your membership, especially if it’s your first time I’ll need the following information;

 

Name:

Phone Number:

Email Address:

Mailing Address:

Degree of Vision Loss:

Date of Birth:

 

Thx, Albert

 

***

 

Albert A. Ruel

From an Island in The Pacific

Parksville BC, Canada

Albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

iPhone: +1-250-240-2343

 

Life is a journey not a destination, enjoy the trip.

 

 

 

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Privacy protection, December 10, 2018

December 10 2018

Privacy protection

 

Happy holidays everyone!

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to introduce you to my tip on privacy protection.

 

Privacy protection

You are planning to open banking accounts

The safest way for you to ensure that your personal banking details are kept private and confidential is for you to visit your bank and enlist the help of bank staff.

They will help you and you need not worry about your privacy being compromised.

You may want to see if they could provide you with electronic documentation but this should not be counted on.

 

The safest piece of advice that I can offer is for you to be stubborn and demand electronic documentation.  This is what I had to do several times.

 

 

That’s it from me for this week.

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Apps Round Up, December 3, 2018

December 03 2018

Apps round up

 

Happy holidays everyone!

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to introduce you to my apps round up.

 

  1. Battery Monitor App (iOS, Free)

 

Battery Monitor, the most accurate battery life monitoring app on the App

Store. With its simple battery life calibration, you can get estimations

with down-to-the-minute accuracy (±1min)! It also have a handy widget to

access estimations anywhere!

 

This app contains calibration for battery usage, battery charging time and

much more, making it the most accurate on the App Store! Don’t download

those clones you find everywhere, download this FREE app now!

 

Features:

* ±1 min battery life accuracy*

* ±1 min charging time accuracy*

* Simple interface, easy to use

* iOS Widget for easy access

* One time battery calibration

 

Current Version: 1.1 (November 21, 2017)

Read Battery Monitor App’s AppleVis App Directory entry for more information

https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/utilities/battery-monitor-app

Visit Battery Monitor App’s App Store page

https://itunes.apple.com/app/battery-monitor-simple-accurate/id1182374760

 

  1. Shortcuts (iOS, Free)

 

Siri Shortcuts deliver a quick way to get things done with your apps with

just a tap or by asking Siri. The Shortcuts app enables you to create

personal shortcuts with multiple steps from your favorite apps. Start from

hundreds of examples in the Gallery or drag and drop to create your own.

 

Shortcuts includes over 300 built-in actions and works with many of your

favorite apps including Contacts, Calendar, Maps, Music, Photos, Camera,

Reminders, Safari, Health as well as any app that supports Siri Shortcuts.

 

Use the Shortcuts app to:

 

* Get directions home, send your ETA and start listening to the news, just

by asking Siri

* Add a home screen icon that calls a loved one

* Make animated GIFs

* Make PDFs from Safari or any app with a share sheet

* Get directions to the nearest coffee shop in one tap

* Tweet the song you’re listening to

* Get all of the images on a web page

* Send a message including the last screenshot you took

* And so much more…

 

Shortcuts can be launched from the Today widget, from Search or by asking

Siri. You can even add an app icon to your home screen for your favorite

Shortcuts.

 

Shortcuts opens up incredible possibilities to automate things you do

regularly on your iPhone and iPad.

 

Current Version: 2.0 (September 17, 2018)

Read Shortcuts’ AppleVis App Directory entry for more information

https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/productivity/shortcuts

Visit Shortcuts’ App Store page

https://itunes.apple.com/app/workflow-powerful-automation/id915249334?ign-mpt=uo%3D8&at=11l4LS

 

That’s it from me for this week.

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

Now you  can subscribe to “‘Let’s Talk Tips”‘ which is my monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,

Business, and Advocacy.

http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna