CCB-GTT Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Desktop Shortcuts, Summary Notes, May 6, 2020 with Link to CCB Podcast Recording

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

 

GTT is an exciting initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind, founded in Ottawa in 2011 by Kim Kilpatrick and Ellen Goodman.  GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision in their exploration of low vision and blindness related access technology.  Through involvement with GTT participants can learn from and discuss assistive technology with others walking the same path of discovery.

 

GTT is made up of blindness related assistive technology users, and those who have an interest in using assistive technology designed to help blind and vision impaired people level the playing field.  GTT groups interact through social media, and periodically meet in-person or by teleconference to share their passions for assistive technology and to learn what others can offer from their individual perspectives.

Summary Notes:

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Desktop Shortcuts, May 6, 2020 Link to Podcast

Theme: Desktop Shortcuts

Presenter: Gerry Chevalier

Gtt.edmonton@gmail.com

In this second episode of Using Windows From the Keyboard, Gerry, without touching the mouse,  shows how to create desktop shortcuts to a web site, to the documents folder, and to the Microsoft Word app. Two methods are demonstrated: the desktop shortcut creation wizard and how to copy start menu shortcuts to the desktop. Also demonstrated is how to change the shortcut name, assign a hotkey, and specify the target app to run in a maximized window.

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators:

Albert Ruel                   or                       Kim Kilpatrick

1-877-304-0968,550                               1-877-304-0968,513

albert.GTT@CCBNational.net                GTTProgram@Gmail.com

CCB Backgrounder:

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

 

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

 

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

 

 

CCB-GTT Windows From The Keyboard Tips, Intro Session Keyboard, Desktop, Start Menu, Task Bar, Summary Notes April 29, 2020 with Link to Podcast Recording

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

 

GTT is an exciting initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind, founded in Ottawa in 2011 by Kim Kilpatrick and Ellen Goodman.  GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision in their exploration of low vision and blindness related access technology.  Through involvement with GTT participants can learn from and discuss assistive technology with others walking the same path of discovery.

 

GTT is made up of blindness related assistive technology users, and those who have an interest in using assistive technology designed to help blind and vision impaired people level the playing field.  GTT groups interact through social media, and periodically meet in-person or by teleconference to share their passions for assistive technology and to learn what others can offer from their individual perspectives.

 

Summary Notes:

Access the CCB Podcast from this link: Windows From The Keyboard Tips, Intro Session Keyboard, Desktop, Start Menu, Task Bar, April 29, 2020

 

Presenter: Gerry Chevalier

Gtt.edmonton@gmail.com

In this first episode of Using Windows From the Keyboard, Gerry introduces basic concepts of using Windows without a mouse emphasizing the most important keyboard keys to use instead of the mouse. He also describes the main working areas of Windows: the Desktop, Start Menu, Task Bar, and System Tray. He concludes with examples of the importance of using the Applications key.

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators:

 

Albert Ruel                   or                       Kim Kilpatrick

1-877-304-0968,550                               1-877-304-0968,513

albert.GTT@CCBNational.net                GTTProgram@Gmail.com

 

CCB Backgrounder:

 

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

 

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

 

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

 

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Document Backstage View, May 27, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Microsoft Office – Document Backstage View

The Backstage view is a useful interface to explore and use for keyboard users.
When you launch Microsoft Office apps such as Excel, Word, or Power Point via a desktop icon or from the Start menu you are placed in the Backstage view. The Backstage view replaces the File menu on older versions of Office. You may also reach the Backstage view by pressing Alt+F. Backstage view has a list of categories that allow you to open or save documents, print documents, export documents to other formats such as PDF or HTML, manipulate the current document’s properties, and more. You select the Backstage category from a list of categories using Up/Down arrows. For each category, there are different controls which you can explore with Tab or Shift+Tab.

For example, the Open category allows you to reopen a document from a list of recent documents or, if you press Down arrow on the Recent tab, you will find other sources for documents such as OneDrive, This PC,and a Browse button. The Browse button will launch the usual Open File Dialogue.

The Info category allows you to protect/unprotect a file, add a security password to a file, or add title or author attributes, add search keywords, and more. Note that adding a document title in the Backstage view is especially useful if you plan to save the document in html format for later inclusion as a web page. The document title will then become the web page title when you save the Word document as an HTML document.

Although the Backstage view is completely Accessible, sometimes it just gets in the way. You may just want to open MS Word and start a new blank document. You can exit the backstage view and return to the document window by pressing Escape. For example, to start a new MS Word document simply launch Word, then press Escape to exit the Backstage view and you will be in a blank document Window. Type your document and then press F12 to save it.

GTT National Conference Call, AccessiBuild Indoor Navigation App Summary Notes, April 8, 2020 with Link to the CCB Podcast Episode

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

GTT is an exciting initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind, founded in Ottawa in 2011 by Kim Kilpatrick and Ellen Goodman.  GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision in their exploration of low vision and blindness related access technology.  Through involvement with GTT participants can learn from and discuss assistive technology with others walking the same path of discovery.

GTT is made up of blindness related assistive technology users, and those who have an interest in using assistive technology designed to help blind and vision impaired people level the playing field.  GTT groups interact through social media, and periodically meet in-person or by teleconference to share their passions for assistive technology and to learn what others can offer from their individual perspectives.

Summary Notes:

April 8, 2020

Theme: Accesibuild Indoor Navigation App Link to Podcast Recording

Presenters: Jeff Godfrey, app developer,  can be reach through Accesibuild web site.

Brian Bibeault, beta tester

GTT.Northbay@gmail.com

In this regular CCB-GTT national conference call, the presenters demonstrate this new iOS and soon to be Android free indoor navigation app. The app helps anyone including blind and low vision people find points of interest in a building based on a digitized 3D map created by the app developer that is downloaded to the user’s smartphone. The building owner pays for the map development while the app is free for the user.

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators:

Albert Ruel                   or                       Kim Kilpatrick

1-877-304-0968,550                               1-877-304-0968,513

albert.GTT@CCBNational.net                GTTProgram@Gmail.com

CCB Backgrounder:

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

GTT Youth Weekly Meeting Announcement, May 26, 2020 via Zoom Conference

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by

Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

Invites all Blind and visually impaired  youth from ages 16 – 25 ish  to a weekly social drop-in Zoom gathering

 

Theme: To strengthen community through socialization and interaction

Date: Every Wednesday at 2:00 PM eastern time

  • Where: Zoom conference room. These gatherings will be moderated

CCB and GTT are inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/5593858367?pwd=ckxOQzRhWTdTNzR0bDZWTm40NFJMdz09

Meeting ID: 559 385 8367

Password: 0880

CCB Backgrounder:

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Ribbons and the Quick Access Tool Bar, May 20, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Microsoft Office – Ribbons and the Quick Access Tool Bar

Navigating the ribbon commands with the keyboard or trying to remember many Key Tip sequences can be frustrating especially for commands that you use frequently. The Quick Access tool bar can mitigate this frustration. You can place frequently used ribbon commands on the Quick Access tool bar where they can be found quickly and easily.

For example, a common command I use in Excel is to auto adjust the column width to fit the cell contents. This command is on the Home ribbon in the cells group and its key tip sequence is:
ALT+H, O, I
This is difficult to remember to say the least. You can add this ribbon command to the Quick Access Tool Bar as follows:
• While in your Excel workbook, press ALT+H, O, I to select the auto adjust column width command or, press Alt+H to open the Home ribbon and then Tab repeatedly to reach the Auto Adjust Column Width command. However, don’t press Enter to activate the command.
• Instead, press the Applications key to open a context menu, and arrow down to find the “Add to Quick Access Tool Bar” and then press Enter.
• This command is now on the Quick Access Tool Bar.
The next time you need to use the command, follow these simpler steps:
• Press Alt to focus on the main ribbon.
• Press up arrow to reach the Quick Access Tool Bar.
• Arrow left or right on the tool bar to find the Auto fit column width function and press Enter. No memorizing of long shortcuts!
• You can add many ribbon commands to the Quick Access Tool Bar in the same manner. You can also find the command using the Alt+Q command search described in the previous tip, and when the command appears in the search results, press the Applications key to find the option to add it to the Quick Access tool bar.
• If you can remember the order of your Quick Access items, then you can activate them more quickly. For example, press ALT+1 to activate the first Quick Access Tool Bar item, press ALT+2 to activate the second item and so on.
• If you decide to remove a command from the Quick Access Tool Bar, just navigate to the command and then press the Applications key to open the context menu. On my computer the Applications key does not open the context menu on the Quick Access Tool Bar but Shift+F10 does. From the context menu select the item, Remove from the Quick Access Tool Bar, and press Enter. You may find it useful to remove some default commands that Microsoft puts on the tool bar, such as Undo, Redo, Save, which already have simple shortcuts namely, Control+Z, Control+Y, and Control+S, so they tend to just clutter the Quick Access tool bar.
Each Office program e.g. Excel, Word, Outlook and Power Point have their own Quick Access Tool bar and the process for adding commands and using the tool bar is the same.

Workshop: braille screen input for iOS Workshop from Braille Literacy Canada and Get Together with Technology, June 20, 2020

Getting Started with Braille Screen Input on the iPhone: Hands-On Strategies for Success

Presented by Kim Kilpatrick and Leo Bissonnette

 

Braille screen input on iDevices is a powerful and wonderful tool. Participants in this workshop will learn all they need to know to get started with braille screen input on the iPhone. Topics include:

  • Enabling braille screen input
  • Using contracted or uncontracted braille
  • Working with braille screen input
  • Typing feedback
  • Braille input screen gestures
  • Important tips for users

 

A detailed step by step overview will be provided with hands-on demonstrations. Time will be allotted during the final portion of the workshop to answer questions and to provide one-on-one assistance.

 

This workshop is hosted by BLC and Get Together with Technology (GTT). It will be of interest to braille users, teachers and parents.

 

Date: Saturday, June 20th, 2020

Time: 1:00-2:30 PM Eastern (10am Pacific, 11am Mountain/Saskatchewan, 12pm Central, 2pm Atlantic)

Cost: The teleconference is free for BLC members and the cost for non-members is $20.00

 

Please note that if you are part of an organization that is a corporate member of BLC, our teleconferences are free for you as well.

 

To register: Send an email to
info@blc-lbc.ca
by Thursday, June 18th.

 

We hope you can join us to learn more about this tool that brings braille and mainstream technology together!

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Search For Ribbon Commands, May 13, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Microsoft Office – Search for Ribbon Commands
Navigating ribbons using the keyboard or trying to remember Key Tip sequences to find a command can be frustrating. There is a way to quickly search for a ribbon command:
• Press Alt+Q which opens the Office “Tell Me What You Want To DO” feature. You will be placed in an edit box.
• Type the name of the command you are searching for. For example, maybe you want to insert a table in a Word document, so you might type, “insert table”. Or maybe you want to Empty the Deleted items folder in Outlook, so you might type, “empty deleted”.
• Press the down arrow to find the list of search results and likely the ribbon command you need will be in the list. Simply press Enter on the command to execute it.
You have just executed the ribbon command you need without having to navigate the ribbon! The Alt+Q search feature works for all the Office programs: Excel. Word, Outlook, and Power Point.

The Recent Canadian Council of the Blind Study Reveals the Stark Reality of COVID-19’s Disturbing Impact on Those Canadians Who are Blind, Deaf-Blind or Partially-Sighted

The Recent Canadian Council of the Blind Study Reveals the Stark Reality of COVID-19’s Disturbing Impact on Those Canadians Who are Blind, Deaf-Blind or Partially-Sighted

 

BY KEITH D. GORDON PH.D. AND MICHAEL BAILLARGEON

 

It goes without saying that at this time of crisis for the world, we are all feeling more stress than usual. Now imagine how much more stress you might be feeling if you were facing the dreaded COVID-19 with the additional challenges associated with those living with blindness or vision loss. We, at the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB) became aware very early on in the pandemic (late February to early March) that many Canadians who are blind, deaf-blind or partially sighted were being heavily impacted by COVID-19. At the same time it was acutely apparent to the CCB that the many government initiatives and programs being announced in response to pandemic-related challenges were, for the most part, not taking into account what we see as the fundamental needs of not only our community, but all people with disabilities. We perceived the need for all levels of government to provide support and solutions to help those living with disabilities and by extension vision loss, get through these stressful times.

 

We saw it as being necessary to provide the factual support required by governments to act. Working in cooperation with Louise Gillis, CCB National President, we determined that our best course of action would be to survey the vision loss community and report our findings. The survey was designed to specifically identify what impact COVID-19 was having on those living with blindness or vision loss. We wanted to know their current circumstance and daily experiences due to the pandemic, and what their specific concerns and needs were.

 

The survey, conducted electronically during the week of April 7th to April 14th, attained a robust sample of 572 responses with respondents representing all provinces. We promised to let their voices be heard so that they would not be left behind, or forgotten.  Our goal, then and now, was to make sure that the members of the vision loss community would be provided with the support needed, both socially and economically, to weather the COVID-19 pandemic. The results are a call to action and paint a disturbing picture of the experiences Canada’s vision loss community are confronted with, on a daily basis, during this COVID-19 crisis.

Key results of the study showed high levels of stress in the vision loss community. Respondents are very concerned about social distancing – they’re unable to see how far they are from others and are concerned that others don’t realize that they have vision loss and tend to come too close. Respondents feel unsafe when going out.

Those living with vision loss are particularly concerned that the effect of the added stress from the pandemic on their mental health may cause them to become overwhelmed.

 

Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette, Governor General of Canada

 

Sgt Johanie Maheu, Rideau Hall © OSGG-BSGG, 2017

 

This was re-enforced Thursday May 7, during a virtual conversation live streamed on YouTube, between Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette, Governor General of Canada and Dr. Mona Nemer. Canada’s Chief Science Officer, discussing the importance of research and science in the times of global pandemic. When the conversation turned to a discussion on our vulnerable population and people with disabilities, the Governor General remarked as to having received a communication from the Canadian Council of the Blind; “that was alert particularly to the fact that people who are vision impaired are quite anxious in the time of the pandemic and that it was affecting them in many different ways.”

Survey respondents are stressed about their inability to access a doctor or health care practitioner and to meet their financial obligations, and about their ability to maintain their present standard of living. They’re further stressed due to their already-fragile economic status.

Respondents also expressed concern about having transportation and finding someone to accompany them should they have to go to the doctor or hospital.

Shopping is a concern as plexiglass shields make it difficult to negotiate payment and those with seeing disabilities are uncomfortable interacting with staff. About half of the respondents indicated that they had a personal care worker entering their home, about half of whom weren’t wearing proper personal protective equipment.

Respondents are concerned that when the COVID-19 pandemic is over, they’ll discover that their job no longer exists. Many who were asked to work from home have discovered that they don’t have the proper accessible devices and technology necessary to do their jobs from home, and that their employers have refused to provide or fund them.

The survey succeeded at identifying the challenges confronting those living with vision loss during the COVID-19 crisis. As Respondent 211 commented, “What’s affecting my mental health is this prolonged and extreme isolation. As a blind person, I already live a fairly limited life when referring to freedom of movement and independence and now even that small wedge of my active life has been completely eradicated.”

It’s clear that the vision loss community is being heavily impacted by the pandemic. It’s further evident that there’s a need for immediate action from all levels of government to provide support and solutions to help those living with vision loss get through these stressful times. The CCB’s resulting report includes detailed recommendations for all levels of government to consider.

In open-ended questions we discovered that there were a number of respondents who were concerned about their ability to see their eye doctor and that they might lose vision as a result. They also expressed a concern about not having an accompanying person with them when they went for their eye appointment and concern over maintaining social distancing in the doctor’s waiting room. The following are typical responses we received:

Respondent No.444: “I’m worried how long the pandemic and restrictions will last, and the impact on my appointments with doctor and optometrist.”

Respondent No. 441: “I am not able to get my monthly shots in my eyes, vision is going down.”

 

Respondent No. 547: “Can’t see my eye doctor. I need a new prescription and would like glasses instead of contacts.”

Respondent No. 465: “…my fear is having to do things like my eye appointment by myself when I am used to having my daughter with me to guide me and point out hazards in my way.”

Respondent No. 462: “Concerned about maintaining social distance in eye doctor’s waiting room.”

 

The Survey Report on the Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Canadians Who Are Blind, Deaf-Blind, and Partially-Sighted is fully accessible and available on the link above and on the CCB website at http://www.ccbnational.net.

 

Editor’s Note: Both Keith D. Gordon, Senior Research Officer and Michael Baillargeon, Senior Advisor Government Affairs and Special Projects are colleagues at the Canadian Council of the Blind, advocating on a daily basis, for Canadians who are living with blindness or vision loss.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GTT New Westminster Meeting Summary Notes, JAWS and NVDA OCR, November 28, 2018 with Link to Podcast Episode

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

New Westminster Meeting

A Chapter of the Canadian Council of the Blind

in partnership with

Blind Beginnings

Vancouver Community College

And

Canadian Assistive Technology

Summary Notes

November 28, 2018

Theme: JAWS and NVDA OCR Link to Podcast Recording

Presenters: Matthew Alvernaz, matalvernaz@me.com and Albert Ruel, Albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

Apps Demonstrated and Discussed:

This is an older recording from November 2018 that we thought could still assist those who are struggling to access PDF and other graphical images from their PCs.

Matthew Alvernaz and Albert Ruel demonstrated the use of the JAWS Layered Keystrokes to scan and read printed documents, convert PDF files to text, and how to access some graphics on the computer screen.  These features have been available to JAWS users since version 14.

NVDA OCR features were also discussed and demonstrated by Matthew.  NVDA may work better at this task with the OCR Add-on installed in order to provide access to PDF files with the keystroke NVDA/Insert R.

 

NVDA Download Page:

NVDA OCR Download Page: Important: if you are using NVDA 2017.3 or later on Windows 10, please consider using buit-in Windows 10 OCR.

Performs optical character recognition (OCR) to extract text from an object which is inaccessible. The Tesseract OCR engine is used. To perform OCR, move to the object in question using object navigation and press NVDA+r. You can set the OCR recognition language by going to the NVDA settings panel and selecting

JAWS For Windows Download Page:

JAWS Layered Keystrokes for OCR: Layered keystrokes are keystrokes that require you to first press and release INSERT+SPACEBAR, and then press a different key to perform a function in JAWS. Layered keystrokes are easy to use and remember, and they do not interfere with native keystrokes within applications.

Kurzweil Scan and Read for PDF Conversion: Kurzweil 1000 combines traditional reading machine technologies such as scanning, image processing, and text-to-speech with communication and productivity tools.

Openbook Scan and Read for PDF Conversion: OpenBook converts printed documents or graphic-based text into an electronic text format on your PC, using high-quality speech and the latest optical character recognition (OCR) technology. OpenBook is innovative software designed to enhance success for people who are blind or have low vision who need access to printed and electronic materials. OpenBook and the PEARL document camera create a complete scanning and reading system for work, home, and school.

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators:

 

Albert Ruel                   or                             Kim Kilpatrick

1-877-304-0968,550                                    1-877-304-0968,513

albert.GTT@CCBNational.net                   GTTProgram@Gmail.com

 

CCB Backgrounder:

 

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

 

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

 

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Navigating Ribbons Using the Keyboard, May 6, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Microsoft Office – Navigating Ribbons Using the Keyboard
In Office apps such as Outlook, Word, Excel, and Power Point as well as certain non-Office apps such as File Explorer and Wordpad the ribbon provides the command functions of the app. Note: If you are a JAWS for Windows user, be sure to disable the JAWS virtual ribbon menu feature. Press JAWS key + V to open quick settings and type “virtual” into the settings search box. Tab once to reach the list of resulting settings and ensure the virtual ribbon menu feature is unchecked. Here is a summary of how to use ribbon commands from the keyboard.
• There is a ribbon bar at the top of the screen containing a list of ribbon tabs. You reach the list of ribbons by pressing the Alt key and then using left/right arrow keys to move across the list to find the ribbon tab you want. As you move across each tab in the list its corresponding ribbon opens below it. If you don’t see the ribbon bar, try pressing Control+F1which is a toggle that expands and collapses the ribbon bar. It is best to leave the ribbon bar expanded so it is visible.
• When you reach the desired ribbon, press Tab to move to the first command in the ribbon. You may need to press Tab 3 times to skip over the Minimize and Help buttons that are attached to the ribbon bar.
• Then press TAB and Shift+Tab to navigate the ribbon commands. IMPORTANT: Do not use arrow keys to navigate ribbon commands because you will miss some commands. Only use Tab and Shift+Tab.
• At any time, you may press Escape to close the ribbon and return to your document.
• Commands are often grouped on the ribbons. You can jump back and forth between the groups with Control+Left or Control+Right arrow keys.
• For commands with a list of radio button choices, use arrow keys to choose the desired button and press Enter to activate it.
• You can navigate grid items with all 4 arrow keys and press Enter when you find the item you need to execute.
• Commands with split buttons have a menu of choices. You can accept the default choice by pressing Enter or you can open the menu of choices with Alt+Down Arrow.
• Commands with a checkbox can be actioned by pressing spacebar.
• Commands may have submenus which can be opened with Enter.
• There are sequences of shortcut keys to reach the ribbon commands, usually 2 to 4 keys in sequence. These key sequences are called Key Tips and are displayed in little boxes beside the ribbon commands. If you use a screen reader, it should announce the key tips as you navigate the ribbon commands. If you can remember the key tip for a given ribbon command, you can repeat the command by pressing that sequence of keys.
• For example, in Word, you may reach the Font dialogue of the Home ribbon by pressing the key tip sequence: Alt+H to open the Home ribbon followed by F and another F.
• Note that ribbons are contextual. For example, in Outlook if you are focused in the body of an email message and press ALT, you will encounter different ribbons than if you pressed ALT while focused in the headers of your email.
• Also, don’t forget to try your Applications key while in your document. It will bring up a context menu that has a subset of ribbon commands so you may not even need to navigate the ribbon if the command you want is on the Applications context menu.
• If you find ribbon navigation somewhat daunting, the next two tips will offer strategies to simplify using the ribbons from the keyboard.

GTT New Westminster Meeting Summary Notes, Library and Reading Apps for iOS, November 27, 2019

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

New Westminster Meeting

A Chapter of the Canadian Council of the Blind

in partnership with

Blind Beginnings

Vancouver Community College

And

Canadian Assistive Technology

Summary Notes

November 27, 2019

Theme: Library and Reading Apps for iOS

Presenters: Ryan Fleury, Ryan@CanAssTech.com and Albert Ruel, Albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

Apps Demonstrated and Discussed:

Voice Dream Reader/Writer Download from the AppStore.

4 Apps in This Bundle

Voice Dream Reader: demonstrated how to download audiobooks from Dropbox, the Files App and CELA Library.

Voice Dream Writer: demonstrated how to create documents and save them to VDR and how to use it for following an agenda during meetings.

Voice Dream Scanner: not demonstrated, however mentioned in terms of scanning on the fly or downloading from previously scanned documents.

Voice Pack: US English

Safari Browser, CELA Search and Favourites: demonstrated how to search for and download audiobooks to iOS devices, and how to set the CELA Library to the Favourites list.

CELA Library, Daisy Zipped and Direct To Player: demonstrated how to search for and send audiobooks to the Direct To Player bookshelf.

Dolphin EasyReader, CELA Library Direct To Player Download from the AppStore: demonstrated how to download Direct To Player audiobooks to this app from the CELA Library website.

Reading app for Dyslexia & VI by Dolphin Computer Access Ltd

Audible.ca/com: demonstrated how to use the app to listen to purchased audiobooks from the user’s Library.

Google Play Books download from the AppStore: demonstrated how to use the app to listen to purchased audiobooks from the user’s Library.

Other Audiobook Listening Apps Mentioned:

Amazon Speakers

Google Speakers

Overdrive

Cloud Library

Hoopla

Libby

Kindle

iBooks/Apple Books App

 

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators:

 

Albert Ruel                   or                             Kim Kilpatrick

1-877-304-0968,550                                    1-877-304-0968,513

albert.GTT@CCBNational.net                   GTTProgram@Gmail.com

 

CCB Backgrounder:

 

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

 

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

 

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

GTT Beginners National Conference Call Summary Notes, iOS 13 New Gestures, November 26, 2019

Post from the Past:

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

GTT is an exciting initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind, founded in Ottawa in 2011 by Kim Kilpatrick and Ellen Goodman.  GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision in their exploration of low vision and blindness related access technology.  Through involvement with GTT participants can learn from and discuss assistive technology with others walking the same path of discovery.

GTT is made up of blindness related assistive technology users, and those who have an interest in using assistive technology designed to help blind and vision impaired people level the playing field.  GTT groups interact through social media, and periodically meet in-person or by teleconference to share their passions for assistive technology and to learn what others can offer from their individual perspectives.

Show Notes:

GTT Beginners National Conference Call, iOS 13 New Gestures, November 26, 2019

Elmer Thiesen <i.no.see@telus.net> kindly provided this presentation.  For questions contact him directly.

Adding The 2-Finger Swipe for Rotor Gesture

The following are instructions for adding the 2-finger swipe right/left to turn the Rotor in iOS 13X.

  1. Scroll to Settings, One finger double tap.
  2. Scroll to Accessibility, one finger double tap.
  3. Scroll to Voiceover, one finger double tap.
  4. Scroll to Commands, one finger double tap.
  5. Scroll to All Commands, one finger double tap
  6. Scroll to rotor, one finger double tap.
  7. Scroll to Next Rotor, one finger double tap.
  8. scroll to Two Finger Swipe Right, one finger double tap to add.
  9. Go back two pages by one finger double tapping the Back Button at the top left corner of the screen twice.
  10. scroll down to previous rotor. One finger double tap.
  11. Scroll to add gesture, one finger double tap.
  12. scroll to Two Finger Swipe Left, one finger double tap to add.
  13. Go back two pages by one finger double tapping the Back Button at the top left corner of the screen twice, or just close the whole Settings page, your newly added actions are now available with a two finger swipe left or right to rotate your rotor.

Adding the 4-finger Swipe Up/Down Gesture to Open the Voiceover Settings Page

To those interested, the following is instructions on setting up a gesture that will take you directly to the Voiceover Settings Page.

  1. Go to settings one finger double tap.
  2. Go to accessibility, one finger double tap.
  3. go to VoiceOver, one finger double tap.
  4. scroll down to commands, one finger double tap.
  5. scroll down to all commands, one finger double tap.
  6. scroll down to voiceover, one finger double tap.
  7. Scroll to open voice settings, one finger double tap.
  8. Scroll to add gesture, one finger double tap.
  9. Scroll down to whatever gesture you wish to choose, one finger double tap.
    I chose a four finger swipe down.

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators/Trainers:

Kim Kilpatrick 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 513

GTTProgram@Gmail.com

Albert Ruel 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 550

albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

David Green 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 509

AccessibilityTraining7@Gmail.com

CCB Backgrounder:

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

Resource: Ten Conference Call Etiquette Tips for better CCB/GTT meetings

Ten Conference Call Etiquette Tips for better CCB/GTT meetings

Have you ever been on a conference call where people become a distraction by forgetting to put their phone on mute, or have sidebar conversations with others not on the call? We all know a few etiquette rules for at the dinner table, but what about etiquette protocol for conference calls?

Here are some easy guidelines to follow when attending a CCB/GTT Program conference call:

  1. Keep track of conference call dates/times. Make sure you know when your conference call is, and be sure to keep the conference call number and pin handy so you are not scrambling to find it at the last minute. Call in to the conference line a couple minutes early and enjoy chatting with others who arrive before the meeting starts.
  2. To know what is happening at GTT and the CCB Open Chat conference calls, register your email address by activating the Follow Link near the bottom of the page on the Blog at GTTProgram.Blog.
  3. Mute your phone when you are not speaking. To help avoid distracting sounds, conversations, or noises that are not applicable to the conference call, the mute button can be your friend. Muting your phone will help you avoid embarrassing sighs, munching noises from eating your lunch, or other background noise. CCB/GTT Zoom conference calls will mostly function with all participants muted, and those who want to comment or ask questions will be encouraged to use the Raised Hand feature.  Meeting facilitators will keep an eye on the list of Raised Hands and will invite participants to engage in the order the hands were raised.
  4. The Zoom Conference system allows you to include your name in the Participants Panel. If you use a telephone to dial into a CCB/GTT meeting, ask the Host to add your name so others can identify who’s on the call.  Ask a CCB/GTT staff member or volunteer to assist if you don’t know how to ensure your name is included.  As Zoom Bombers often don’t include a name in the Participants List we may remove you from a call if unnamed in such instances.
  5. State your name and where you’re from before speaking. Since the conference call attendees are not all in the same room, it is important for others on the line to know who is speaking so that they can better understand the context of your comments.
  6. Be prepared to discuss the topic at hand. Like with all meetings, you should do a little prep work or jot down topics or questions that you would like to bring up on the conference call.
  7. Keep background noise to a minimum. When you take your phone off mute to speak or to get ready to chime in, make sure that you are not distracting the other callers. This noise may be generated from standing outside in the wind, typing on your computer, kids running around, pets barking, side conversations with people in your vicinity just to name a few. It is best to find a quiet location for the conference call.
  8. Maintain a good telephone or Wi-Fi reception. A bad connection often causes static or dropped calls making your input to the conference call hard to understand, in which case you may have to call back into the meeting.
  9. Many CCB/GTT meetings will have an agenda and it will usually be provided before the conference call. Be sure to attend even if it isn’t a topic you need to learn about, as you might be able to assist others in their learning, and bring questions for the Q and A section of the meeting as there is usually time left for general discussion even when there is a topic on the agenda.
  10. CCB/GTT meetings will always have a defined facilitator and technical host. The facilitator will guide the conversation, introduce any presenters, make sure everyone sticks to the agenda and pays attention to time, the host will look after muting and unmuting the call, renaming participants in the Participants List, lowering hands and recording calls that lend themselves to being recorded.

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Web Browsing – Copying Links, April 22, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Web Browsing – Copying Links
Have you ever wanted to paste a link to a web page into an email or document? While you are on the web page press Alt+D to place focus in the address bar of your web browser. The link of your current web page will be highlighted meaning it is auto selected so you can then just press Control+C to copy the link to the clipboard. Now simply go to the text of your email or document and press Control+V to paste the link. Note: If pasting to an email it’s a good idea to press Enter immediately after pasting the link.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

Windows From The Keyboard Tips, JAWS Specific Web Browsing Shortcuts, April 15, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Web Navigation – Using the Keyboard with JAWS
This blog series is about Windows shortcut keys not specific to screen readers. However, I thought it important to devote this one tip to screen reader navigation on web sites because modern screen readers like JAWS, NVDA, and now Windows Narrator provide so much value added navigation that it is critical that you are aware how you can enhance your web browsing experience if you use a screen reader. the following examples refer to JAWS, but some of the shortcuts will work in NVDA and Windows Narrator screen readers as well.
• While on a web page, regardless of which browser you are using, press the letter H to jump forward from heading to heading at any heading level or Shift+H to jump backwards to the previous heading.
• Press 1 on the number row to jump to a level 1 heading. Press 2 on the number row to jump to a level 2 heading and so on. Many well-organized web pages will use a level 1 heading to begin the main content of the web page. Thus, when the page opens, you can jump directly to the main content simply by pressing 1 on the number row.
• Hold down the JAWS key and press F6 to bring up a list of headings on the web page. Arrow up and down the list of headings or press the first letter of the desired heading. When you find it in the list, just press Enter to position at that heading in the web page.
• Similarly, press the JAWS key + F7 to bring up a list of links on the web page. Arrow up and down the list of links or press the first letter of the desired link. When you find it in the list, just press Enter to activate the link. Note, if you press TAB within the list of links, you will find a “Move to Link” button which will position you on the web page where that link is located rather than activating the link.
• Press Insert+F5 to bring up a list of form fields on a web page. You may then arrow through the fields and press Enter on any field to position to that field on the page. This is a useful way to review all the fields on a form before you fill it out.
• Press B or Shift+B to jump to the next or previous button on the web page.
• Press C or Shift+C to jump to the next or previous combo box drop down on the web page.
• Press E or Shift+E to jump to the next or previous edit box. For example, most web pages have a search edit box to allow you to search the web site and you can reach this edit field by simply pressing the letter e.
• Press L or Shift+L to jump to the next or previous list on the web page.
• Press T or Shift+T to jump forward or backward between tables on the page. Within a table, you may hold down the Control and Alt keys while pressing up, down, left, and right arrows to move among the cells of the table.
• At the top of the table just above the first row, JAWS will announce the number of rows and columns. At this point, you may press F8 to select the entire table and then Control+C to copy the table to the clipboard. You could then paste that table into a Word or Excel document.
Press X or Shift+X to jump to the next or previous check box on the web page.
You may prefix the above shortcuts (B, C, E, L, T, X) with Control+Insert keys to bring up a list of that control. For example, Control+Insert+B will bring up a list of buttons on the page.
• Press Control+F to do a JAWS search but note that this will only search the current page not the entire web site. It is a useful way to position yourself to a location on the page where you know certain text exists.
• Press P or Shift+P to jump to the next or previous paragraph and speak it. P is often more efficient than pressing down arrow to read lines on the page because P will read multiple lines at a time that comprise a paragraph. The equivalent Windows shortcut is Control+Down Arrow.
There are many more JAWS web browsing techniques. Freedom Scientific, the creator of the JAWS screen reader, offers a free self-paced online tutorial called, Surfs Up, to help you effectively surf the web using only the keyboard.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Web Browsing Shortcut Keys, April 8, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

 

Web Browsing – General Shortcut Keys

When browsing a web site there are several general keyboard shortcuts that work for all browsers.

  • Arrow up and down to read line by line.
  • Press Control+Up and Control+Down to navigate to the previous or next paragraph.
  • Press Control+Home to jump to the top of the web page and Control+End to jump to the bottom.
  • Press Tab and Shift+TAB to jump forward or backward from element to element such as between links or form fields.
  • Press Enter to expand menus or Alt+Down Arrow to open drop down lists.
  • When focused on a link, press Enter or spacebar to open the link which results to jumping somewhere else on the same web page or opening a new web page.
  • Press Alt+Left/Right Arrow to move backward /forward among the web pages in your browsing session.
  • Press Alt to reach the menu of your browser and then arrow among the menu items.
  • Press Control+Enter to open a link in a new browser Tab. Tabs are useful if you need to have multiple pages open at the same time. You move back and forth between open Tabs by pressing Control+Shift+Tab (previous Tab) or Control+Tab (next Tab). For example, suppose you are on the main table of contents for a web based user manual. You want to follow the link to chapter 3 but not close the main table of contents web page. In that case, press Control+Enter instead of Enter on the Chapter 3 link. Chapter 3 will open in a new browser Tab and you will remain in the main web page. To switch to the Chapter 3 Tab, press Control+Tab, and when you want to return to the main page, press Control+Shift+Tab. You may have many TABS open at the same time.
  • Press Control+F4 or Control+W to close a browser Tab when you no longer need it.
  • Press Alt+D to place focus on the current web page address/search bar. When you do this, the web address will automatically be highlighted so you could then do one of 3 things: 1) press Control+C to copy the address to the clipboard, or 2) type another address followed by Enter to open that new web site, or 3) type a search string followed by Enter to search for a new web site.
  • Pres Control+E to perform a web search. This will also place focus on the address bar but, in this case, the current address bar is cleared so you can type a new web search string.
  • While on the address bar, you can press Tab or Shift+Tab as well as F6 or Shift+F6 to move forward and backward between different browser controls. The behavior depends on which browser you are using but feel free to try these shortcuts to learn what is available. You will find items such as a history of web pages you visited, or your list of bookmarks and other tool bar items. Of note in the Google Chrome browser is the button to view site information. If you press Shift+TAB on the address bar you will be focused on the View Site Information button which you can press spacebar to activate. It describes the security level of your web page so that you can be confident the information exchanged between you and the web site is done in a secure manner.
  • This is a good place to discuss security and safe web browsing. In general, when on the address bar you can tell that a web site is secure if its address begins with https where the ‘s’ denotes a secure site. If you are on a web page whose address begins with only http, then be careful about exchanging information with that site. It is not a secure site and may even be masquerading as a company or organization that it is not.

 

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

Windows From The Keyboard Tips, How to Use the Recycle Bin, April 1, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

 

Windows File Explorer – How to Use the Recycle Bin

Have you ever accidentally deleted a file and wanted to get it back? In File Explorer a deleted file is not actually removed from your computer. Rather, the file is moved to the Recycle Bin, so it is possible to restore the file. To restore a deleted file, follow this procedure.

  • Press Windows key + M to go to the desktop.
  • Press R multiple times until you reach the Recycle Bin icon and then press Enter to open the Recycle Bin.
  • You will be placed in a list of deleted files. Likely, your deleted file is in this list unless it was deleted a very long time ago. Also, when you deleted the file, if you pressed Shift+Delete to bypass the Recycle Bin, then the file will have been removed from your computer.
  • You can arrow up and down the list of files to find the file you have deleted. If you know the file name, you may press its first letter multiple times until you reach the desired file. Note that beside each file are details such as the name of the original folder that contained the file and its deletion date. You can read these values with a screen reader by using the right arrow or reading the entire line.
  • When you find the file, press the Applications key.
  • From the resulting context menu, select the Restore item and press Enter. The file will be restored to its original folder on your computer.
  • Press Alt+F4 to close the Recycle Bin.

Sorting the Recycle Bin:

If you have many files in the Recycle Bin, or you cannot remember the name of the file you deleted, it may help to sort the file list as follows.

  • If the current file you are focused on is selected, then unselect it by pressing Control+Spacebar .
  • Press the Applications key.
  • Arrow through the resulting context menu and select the Sort By submenu and press Enter to open it.
  • Arrow through the submenu and choose the sort option you want. For example, you can sort the list of files alphabetically by name, by their original location, by the deletion date, or by the date the file was last modified. You can also choose ascending or descending order.

 

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

Announcement: BRF Version of the March 2020 Braille Literacy Canada Newsletter

Dear Braille Literacy Canada members,

 

Thanks to a partnership with CELA, it has been possible for quite some time now for members to request a hard copy version of the Braille Literacy Canada newsletter through the CELA library. As a result of a government directive, the production of DAISY CDs and physical braille through CELA are now on hold in an effort to combat Covid-19. Access to digital books, magazines and newspapers will continue. For more info please visit the CELA website:

https://celalibrary.ca/covid-19

 

For those who have access to a braille display, from this link you will be able to download a BRF copy of the March 2020 newsletter sent to members yesterday. We hope that this will be helpful to those who prefer reading each issue in braille. I would like to thank our Past President, Jen Goulden, for working so quickly on the braille transcription. We would also like to thank CELA for their continued partnership!

 

Happy reading!

Natalie Martiniello

President, Braille Literacy Canada

president@blc-lbc.ca

 

 

COVID-19: Canadian Council of the Blind Public Posts Regarding COVID-19

The CCB has made available to its members and the general public some important facts and resources that can be accessed from the following link:

 

COVID-19

 

Thx, Albert