Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Microsoft Word – Determining Word or Character Counts, October 21, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.
Microsoft Word – Determining Word or Character Counts
While in a Word document, you can find out how many words or characters are in the entire document or a selected block of text. Select the block of text of interest or don’t select anything if you are interested in the counts for the entire document. Press F6 to jump to the Status tool bar at the bottom of the screen. Arrow right to the Word count button. Press spacebar on the word count button to find the number of characters, lines, and paragraphs. Press Escape to go back from the status tool bar to the body of your document.
Note: For users of the JAWS screen reader, you can press the JAWS+NumPad3 key to read the document status line which announces the number of pages and words.
That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Microsoft Word Shortcut for Bulleted or Numbered Lists, September 30, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Microsoft Word – Shortcut for Creating a Bulleted or Numbered List

You may quickly create a bulleted list of items in your document as follows.

  • Press the asterisk (*) key plus a space at the start of your first item. Type the item text and press Enter.
  • The asterisk will be changed to a bullet and the next line will also start with a bullet so you can type the second item.
  • Continue typing the remaining items of your list and press Enter twice on the last item to turn off the auto-bullet marking.
  • You can also bullet text that is already typed by selecting the line or lines of text and pressing Control+Shift+L.

 

Similarly, you can type a numbered list.

  1. Press “1.” Without the quotes Followed by a space and the text of your first item and then press Enter.
  2. The next line will begin with “2.”. Continue typing the items in your list and press Enter after each item. Each new line will be numbered incrementally.
  3. Press Enter twice on the last item to turn off the auto numbering.

If you later delete one of the numbered items, or insert a new item, the remaining items are automatically renumbered.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Microsoft Word Manual Spell Check, September 23, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Microsoft Word – Manual Spell Check

The previous tip discussed the automatic spell check that Word can do as you type your document. However, you may manually want to spell check after you complete the document or perhaps spell check a document written by someone else.

With your Word document open, press F7 to start the spell checker. The spell check window will open, show the number of spell check issues, and place focus on the “Review all Results” button.

  • Press spacebar to activate this review button and you will be taken to the first issue. Word will show what it considers to be the issue, suggest a correction, and show the sentence containing the error. If you use JAWS, it will automatically speak that information for you. If you don’t use a screen reader there is also a button to have Word read the sentence containing the error to you.
  • If you agree with the suggested correction, just press Enter and Word will make the correction and move to the next issue.
  • Otherwise, you may TAB through the correction dialogue where you have multiple choices of actions you may take. There is a button to ignore the issue, ignore all occurrences of that issue in the document, or add the item to Word’s dictionary so it will not be flagged in the future. You may activate those buttons as needed and you will then be moved to the next issue in the document. You may also press Escape anytime to close the spell check window and return to your document.
  • Also, rather than pressing TAB to move through the dialogue controls, you may simply press a single shortcut letter. For example, press key I to ignore the issue, key G to ignore all issues, or key A to add the item to the dictionary. If you press I or G, the item is ignored, and you are moved to the next issue.
  • Thus, you can quickly move through all issues by simply pressing Enter to accept the correction, I to ignore it, or G to ignore all occurrences.
  • There is also a Settings button in the dialogue that you may activate to change how the spell checker behaves.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Microsoft Word, Spell Check and Find Synonyms, September 16, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Microsoft Word – Quick Spelling Correction and Finding Synonyms

As you are typing, you might make a typo or hear a misspelled word. If you press the Applications key on the incorrect word, a context menu will open, and Windows will suggest what it thinks is the correct word. Simply press Enter to accept the correction, or Escape to return to your document, or press Tab for additional options such as adding the word to the spelling dictionary, or ignoring it. IF a new word is not suggested when you press the Applications key, then Windows is not aware of the misspelling.

 

Also, when you think you might have used a word too frequently or think there might be a better word to use but you can’t think of one, just press the Applications key on the word. When the context menu opens, arrow down to the Synonyms submenu and press Enter. You will be placed in a list of synonyms. IF one of them is desirable, just press Enter and your original word will be replaced with the chosen synonym. If you don’t like any of the choices, just press Escape to close the menu.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Microsoft Word F12 Save As Shortcut, September 9, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Microsoft Word – F12 Save As Shortcut

When editing a new Microsoft Word document that has not yet been saved, you may press Control+S to save the document. However, this brings up the Back Stage Save-As dialogue which is accessible but somewhat awkward to use from the keyboard.

  • Instead of Control+S, you may prefer to press F12. This brings up the more familiar Save-As dialogue with focus in the file name edit box where you can type your new document’s file name. If you want to choose a specific folder to save the document, then Shift+Tab twice to reach the list of files of the current destination folder from where you can navigate to another folder.
  • Note that there are many controls in the Save As dialogue. Rather than pressing TAB many times to reach the Save button, you may just press Alt+S from any of the dialogue fields to activate the Save button.
  • The “Save As Type” field is worth noting. Press TAB once from the file name field to reach it. You may use this list field to convert your document. Arrow up and down the list to see which types of documents you can convert to. For example, you may want to convert your Word document (DOCX type) to a flat text (TXT) type document or to a PDF document. Suppose you want your Word document to be converted to a web page. To do this, select document type, web page HTM or HTML. A second copy of your file will be saved in the new document type you select, and your original document type will also be retained.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Microsoft Word Shortcut Keys Part 2, September 2, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Microsoft Word – General Shortcut Keys Part 2

  • Press Control+O to open a new document. You will be placed in the Backstage view where you can press Up/Down arrows to select from the list of Backstage categories, press Left/Right to choose the Tabs for the selected category, and press Enter to open a Tab. The Recent Tab allows you to browse a list of recently used documents. The Document Tab lets you browse your computer folders.
  • While editing a document, press F6 to cycle between the document pane, the status line at the bottom of the screen, and the ribbon. Press Shift+F6 to cycle in the reverse direction.
  • Press Control+F6 to cycle between documents if you have more than one document opened.
  • Press Control+F to search the document. Press Escape to exit the Find dialogue and return to the document.
  • Press Control+PageDown to find the next search item or Control+PageUp to find the previous search item.
  • Press Control+H to search and replace within the document. Note this search and replace dialogue has an option to replace one or all of the search items. For example, you could replace all occurrences of John with Jane.
  • Press Control+Shift+E to toggle the Track Changes feature on or off. With Track Changes on, your revisions will be highlighted so others can see what you have changed in the document.
  • Press F3 to toggle lower/upper case.
  • Press F7 to spell check your document.
  • Press F12 to Save a new document (Save AS window).
  • Press Control+S to save an amended document that has been previously saved.
  • Press Control+W or Control+F4 to close a document window. If you have modified the document since you last saved it, you will be prompted to save or don’t save it.
  • Press Control+P to print a document.
  • Press Control+Z to undo your last action. This is valuable to restore something you accidentally delete or type or paste. You can undo multiple actions by pressing Control+Z multiple times.
  • Press Control+Shift+C to copy the formatting of the current paragraph (e.g. font, bullets, indentation etc.). You can then position to another paragraph and press Control+Shift+V to apply that same formatting to the other paragraph.
  • Press Control+Shift+N to restore the default formatting of the current paragraphs or selected text. This is a quick way to remove headings, font changes, underlining, bolding, bullets or any other formatting that you may have accidentally applied. The text will simply be returned to your default document format.
  • Press Alt to focus on the Office upper ribbon. Press the left/right arrow to move among the upper ribbon tabs.
  • Press TAB to move to the first command for a given ribbon tab. Press TAB and Shift+TAB to move forward and backward among the commands. Press Control+Left/Right arrow to move from one command group to another.
  • For button items, press spacebar or Enter to activate. For a split button, which acts like a menu with multiple choices, press Enter to activate the default choice, or press Alt+Down arrow to open the split button menu and then press Tab or arrow keys to move between the other choices.
  • If you reach a ribbon item you want to use often, press the Applications key to open a context menu for that item . Arrow down the menu and press Enter to add the item to the Quick Access Tool Bar. The next time you require that item, press Alt to reach the ribbon, then up arrow to focus on the Quick Access Tool Bar and then arrow to the required item. Finding an item from the Quick Access Tool Bar is typically much faster than finding it on the ribbons.

 

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Microsoft Word – General Shortcut Keys Part 1, August 26, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Microsoft Word – General Shortcut Keys Part 1

While working in a Microsoft Word document (or other documents such as Outlook emails) you can:

  • Press Backspace to delete the previous character.
  • Press Control+Backspace to delete the previous word.
  • Press Delete key to delete the current character at the cursor.
  • Press Control+Delete to delete the next word.
  • To bold text press Control+B, type the text, then press Control+B to turn off bolding. Or, if the text is already typed, select what you want bolded using the Shift plus arrow keys and then press Control+B.
  • The above procedure is identical for underlining text or italicizing text. Just substitute Control+U for underlining and Control+I for italics.
  • Press Control+E to centre the current line.
  • Press Control+Shift+. (period) to increase the font size.
  • Press Control+Shift+, (comma) to decrease the font size.
  • Press Control+Z to undo the last edit action.
  • Press left/right arrow keys to move from character to character.
  • Press Up/Down arrows to move from line to line.
  • Press Home or End keys to move to the beginning or end of a line.
  • Press Control+Home or Control+End to move to the start or end of the document.
  • Press Control+Left/Right arrow keys to move between words.
  • Press Control+Up/Down arrows to move between paragraphs.
  • Include the Shift key with the above navigation shortcut keys to select the text.
  • Press Control+C to copy selected text to the clipboard.
  • Press Control+V to paste text from the clipboard into the document.
  • Press Control+Alt+V to open the paste special menu which allows you to decide how to paste the clipboard contents. For example, you can select to paste as html, plain text, picture, Word object, or RTF. Press Escape to exit the menu without making a choice. It’s important to paste as plain text if you are copying from other documents such as an email in order that you don’t paste the font or formatting of the source document into your Word document. Pasting as plain text will ensure the copied text conforms to the formatting of your Word document.
  • Press Alt+Up/Down arrow keys to move between sentences.
  • Press Control+G to enter a page number to jump to in the document.
  • Press Control+Enter to enter a page break into the document.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

CCB-GTT Using CELA Library from the Keyboard Part 2 of 2, Magazines and Newspapers, August 19, 2020 with a link to the podcast episode

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB), the voice of the blind in Canada.

Summary Notes:

August 19, 2020

Theme:  CELA Library Magazines and Newspapers

Use the above link to play and/or download the CCB podcast

Presenter: Gerry Chevalier

GTT.Edmonton@gmail.com

 

In this 15 minute second of two presentations, Gerry presents the magazine and newspaper services offered by the  CELA Library from a keyboard user’s perspective. CELA is Canada’s largest nationwide library service for persons unable to read print. It offers materials in alternate print formats such as recorded DAISY audio , digital text, and braille. Gerry shows how to find a magazine in Direct to Player format and apply search filters. He also shows how to subscribe to magazines. He then describes how to find and read newspapers online. His explanations describe keyboard navigation  and shortcuts for blind users who cannot use a mouse.

For more information about the GTT Program including one on one tech training contact:

Phone: (613)567-0311 or 1-877-304-0968

Email: ccb@ccbnational.net

Web www.ccbnational.net

 

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, How to Search for Outlook Email Messages, August 19, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Outlook – Search for Messages

If you want to find an older message which may be in your Sent items or Deleted items, first move to the folder where you believe the message is. Do this with Control+Y to bring up the tree view of folders and then arrow to the folder or press its first letter, and then press Enter to open the folder. Now, to search in that folder, press Control+E. An edit box opens. Type one or more words you believe are in the message such as an email name, a unique word from the subject line or within the message body. Then press TAB several times and you will be in a list of messages where your search text was found.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

Using CELA Library from the Keyboard Part 1 of 2, Overview and Book Search, August 12, 2020 with a link to the CCB podcast

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB), the voice of the blind in Canada.

Summary Notes:

August 12, 2020

Theme:  CELA Library Overview and Book Search

Use the above link to play and/or download the CCB podcast.

Presenter: Gerry Chevalier

GTT.Edmonton@gmail.com

 

In this 27 minute first of two presentations, Gerry presents an overview of how to use the CELA Library service from a keyboard user’s perspective. CELA is Canada’s largest nationwide library service for persons unable to read print. It offers materials in alternate print formats such as recorded DAISY audio , digital text, and braille. Gerry explains these formats and service options. Gerry demonstrates how to login to the service and reviews the main page. He shows how to set search preferences, search for a book in Direct to Player format, apply search filters, and browse for books. His explanations describe keyboard navigation  and shortcuts for blind users who cannot use a mouse.

For more information about the GTT Program including one on one tech training contact:

Phone: (613)567-0311 or 1-877-304-0968

Email: ccb@ccbnational.net

Web www.ccbnational.net

 

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, How to Quickly Move to Outlook Folders, August 12, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Outlook Email – How to Quickly move to Other Folders

While in your email view, you may press Control+Y to bring up a tree view of other email folders that you have created in the past. Arrow up and down the list to the folder you want, and press Enter to open it. Or, you can also use first letter navigation to jump to a folder in the tree view whose name begins with that letter. For example, to quickly get to your Sent items folder, press Control+Y and then press S multiple times until you find Sent items. Then press Enter to open the Sent items folder. Similarly, to open your deleted items folder, press Control+Y, then press D multiple times until you reach deleted items. Then press Enter to open it. To quickly return to your main inbox folder, press Control+Shift+I. To move a message from one folder to another, press Control+Shift+V. Focus is placed in the tree view of folders. Arrow down or press its first letter to choose the destination folder and press Enter to move the message. The folder list is a tree view. If you have subfolders, you may need to arrow down to find the top level folder and then arrow right to open the subfolder. First letter navigation also works to jump to a desired folder but only if the branch of the folder tree that contains the desired folder is open. For example, suppose you have a folder called Math that is a subfolder of School. You can press M to jump to the Math folder but only after you first press S to jump to the School folder and then press right arrow to open the school folder.

 

Note that the Control+Y tree folder does not offer the ability to create new folders, rename folders, or delete folders. To do these functions you need to press Shift+F6 from the list of messages to focus on the tree view of folders. You navigate this tree as explained above but in this view you are able to press Applications key on any of the folders to obtain functions such as delete or rename.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, How to Disable Show In Groups Feature in Outlook Email, August 5, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions.  The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.

Outlook Email – How to Disable the Show in Groups  Feature

For keyboard users, the Outlook email feature to group your messages can cause confusion. It allows messages to be grouped by date and when you arrow up and down your message list this may result in messages not appearing that you know should be there. You can collapse or expand the ‘Show in Groups’ by using left or right arrow respectively. On the other hand, you may wish to just disable the Show in Groups feature. To do this, while in your Outlook email, press Alt+V to go to the View Tab of the ribbon. Then, press Tab until you reach the Arrange By submenu. Press Enter to open this submenu and Tab to the Show in Groups checkbox and press space bar if it is checked. This disables the Show in Groups feature for your current email folder. Unfortunately, you will need to do this for each of your email folders.

That’s it for this tip. Until next Wednesday, happy computing.

 

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Create an Outlook Meeting Request, July 29, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.
Outlook – Creating a Meeting Request
Outlook provides a special type of appointment called a meeting request. It allows you to send a meeting request to several people at the same time and each of them can accept your meeting request which will automatically create an appointment in their Outlook calendar. You will also be informed with an email from each person who accepts your meeting request. Follow these steps to use the keyboard to create a meeting request.
• From any Outlook view, press Control+Shift+Q to start a new meeting request. The meeting request window will open where you can enter your meeting details.
• Type the title of your meeting and press TAB. You will be placed in the “Required” field.
• Type the email addresses of the people you need to attend the meeting. Outlook will auto complete email addresses just as when you are filling in the “To” field of an email. Press TAB after entering all the required emails and you will be placed in the Optional field.
• Type the email addresses of the people who can optionally attend your meeting or just press TAB to leave this field blank.
• TAB through and enter the date and times your meeting will begin and end.
• There is a field to find a meeting room which you can ignore.
• Don’t forget to fill in the Location field because everyone needs to know where to meet, or which teleconference number to dial, or, if it is an online Zoom meeting, you could paste the link to the Zoom meeting room here.
• Then press Alt+S to save the meeting time in your Outlook calendar as well as send it to the Outlook outbox for emailing the request to your recipients.
• Each recipient will receive an email with your Meeting Request. To accept/decline your request they can press the Applications key on the request email in their inbox. A context menu will open allowing them to choose to accept or decline.
• As each person accepts or declines your meeting, you will receive an email notification in your own inbox. These emails are just for information and can be deleted.

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Outlook – Protected Email Attachments, July 22, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.
Outlook – Protected Documents on Email Attachments
By default, Windows will protect Office documents that originate from the Internet such as downloaded documents or documents attached to emails. You have probably received an email with an attached Word or Excel document. After saving the attached document and opening it, you notice it has opened in protected view. With a screen reader, you can verify the protected view by reading the screen title line when the document is open. Windows automatically protects documents that originate from the Internet to inhibit malware macros that could be present in the document. However, protecting the document prevents you from editing it, and it may also cause some accessibility issues with screen readers even if you just want to read the document.
If you trust the sender of the document, you can easily turn off the document’s protection.
• With the document open, press Alt+F. This will bring up the list of categories in the document Backstage view. Sometimes, my screen reader tells me the protected document is not open and it is unresponsive to my keyboard. If I Alt+TAB away from the document and Alt+Tab back to it then it unlocks, and I can press Alt+F.
• Arrow down to the Info category of the Backstage view which gives access to the document properties.
• TAB repeatedly through the document properties of the Info category until you reach the “Enable editing” button and press the space bar. This turns off the document’s protected mode so you can edit it.
• Note: If you Tab beyond the Enable Editing button you will find a link to take you to the Trust Centre where you can modify the global protection settings. For example, you could prevent future documents received from the Internet from being automatically protected. However, for safety, I recommend leaving the global protection settings unchanged because it’s safer to have Internet documents protected by default.

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, How to Save Outlook Attachments, July 15, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.
Outlook – How to Save an Attached Document
If you receive an email with one or more attached documents and wish to save the documents, follow these steps:
• From the email message, press Shift+Tab to focus in the email attachments list.
• If there is more than one attachment, arrow left or right to select the document you wish to save. If you wish to save all the attachments press Control+A to select them all.
• Press Control+C to copy the selected attachment(s) to the clipboard.
• Use File Explorer to open the folder where you wish to save the attachment(s).
• Press Control+V to paste the attachment(s) to this folder.
Here’s a second way to save attached documents without using File Explorer.
• From the email message press Shift+Tab to focus in the email attachments list.
• If there is more than one attachment, arrow left or right to select the document you wish to save.
• Press the Applications key or Shift+F10 to open a context menu.
• Arrow down the menu and press Enter on the Save As menu item.
• This opens the Windows Save As dialogue so you can save the attachment.
Note that one of the items in the context menu is to save all attachments so it is not necessary to repeat the above steps for each attachment. If you use the Save All Attachments menu option, you will be placed in a dialogue to confirm and then a second dialogue to select the folder you wish to save all the attachments to.

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, 10 tutorial Podcasts now available for download, July 10, 2020

Beginner Podcast Series on Using Windows from the Keyboard

Hosted by the Get Together with Technology (GTT) Program,

An initiative of the

Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB), the voice of the blind in Canada™.

 

Basic Windows from The Keyboard Podcast Tutorials

by Gerry Chevalier
GTT.Edmonton@Gmail.com

During the spring of 2020 Gerry presented 10 Zoom webinars on how to use Windows from the Keyboard. If you are blind or experiencing progressive vision loss that makes it difficult to use a mouse, these lessons teach the basics of using Windows without a mouse. The lesson recordings are available on the Canadian Council of the Blind podcast feed. The lessons are not about screen readers. The lessons emphasize Windows keyboard shortcuts and techniques so they will be relevant to both low vision users and screen reader users.

Links to the 10 recorded episodes and show notes are listed below.

If you have additional suggestions for CCB podcasts, please let us know.

Phone: (613)567-0311

Tol Free: 1-877-304-0968.

Email: ccb@ccbnational.net

 

To listen to each of the 10 episodes listed below from your computer or smart device, simply click on the individual session links provided, and PC screen reader users can use their Quick Navigation key B once on the episode site to access the Play/Pause button.  Press the Space Bar to activate it once found.

You can subscribe to the CCB Podcast feed by searching for CCB/Canadian Council of the Blind Podcast on the Victor Reader Stream, or your favorite smart device Pod Catcher.

Happy listening!

Session 1: April 29, 2020

Theme: Intro Session Keyboard, Desktop, Start Menu, Task Bar, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 2: May 6, 2020

Theme: Desktop Shortcuts, Show Notes and Podcast Link.

Bonus Session: May 8, 2020

Theme: Typio Accessible Typing Tutor App, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 3: May 13, 2020

Theme: Task Bar, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 4: May 20, 2020

Theme: Navigating and Selecting Text in Word and Outlook, Show Notes and Podcast Link.

Session 5: May 27, 2020

Theme:  Windows File Explorer, Show Notes and Podcast Link.

Session 6: June 3, 2020

Theme: Windows Recycle Bin and Using External Media, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 7: June 17, 2020

Theme: Internet Browsing, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 8: June 24, 2020

Theme: Microsoft Ribbons, Show Notes and Podcast link.

Session 9: July 1, 2020

Theme:  Microsoft Backstage View and Save As Dialogue

Session 10: July 8, 2020

Theme:  Microsoft Outlook

How to access and download CCB Podcast Episodes:

PC Computer: all the above podcast episodes can be accessed and downloaded from; http://www.ccbpod.podbean.com/. Here’s how:

  1. Open the episode you wish to download and navigate to the Download Link.
  2. In the Social Sharing section of the page is a Download Link along with the number of downloads to date. First letter navigation from the screen reader’s Links List won’t work to access this Download Link. Down arrow to it and press Enter once found.
  3. In the page that loads you will find another Download Link, and once the links are listed using the screen reader’s Links List first letter navigation will work. Press Enter to activate the function. The podcast will be found in your Downloads folder.
  4. To close the Downloads Page Use Control W, which will take you back to the episode page, and Alt left arrow will take you back to the main CCB Podcast page.

Moving Podcast Episodes to the VR Stream:

  • To move all your above episodes to the VR Stream as MP3 files, first create a folder in the $VROtherBooks titled Windows from the Keyboard Tutorials and move the episodes into it.

What is GTT?

Get Together with Technology (GTT) is an initiative

of the Canadian Council of the Blind. GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision improve their independence using technology.  You can learn more about GTT Zoom sessions and other activities  by following the GTT blog. This site also contains much of the information and more from Gerry’s tutorials in written form as weekly blog posts. Look under the category, Windows from the Keyboard Tips.

 

Windows from the Keyboard Tips, Attach a file to an Outlook Email, July 8, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.
Outlook – How to Attach a Document to an Email
It’s easy to attach a file to an email without using a mouse. Highlight the file you wish to attach using File Explorer. Press Control+C to copy it to the clipboard. Then open your new email window and press Control+V to attach the file to the email. Note that this copy/paste method will not always work if you are using Outlook with an Exchange server which is common in business environments.

CCB-GTT Windows from the Keyboard Tips Summary Notes, Backstage and Save As, July 1, 2020 with a Link to the CCB Podcast

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

Summary Notes

July 1, 2020

Theme: Microsoft Backstage View and Save As Dialogue

Use the above link to play and/or download the CCB Podcast.

Presenter: Gerry Chevalier

Gtt.edmonton@gmail.com

In this 24 minute 9th episode of the Windows from the Keyboard series, Gerry discusses Microsoft Backstage view and the standard Windows Save As Dialogue. He explains how to navigate the Backstage view categories and their associated controls. He also comments on differences between the standard Windows Open and Save As dialogues compared to their equivalents in the Backstage View and explains the standard Save As dialogue controls.

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators/Trainers:

Kim Kilpatrick 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 513

GTTProgram@Gmail.com

David Green 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 509

AccessibilityTraining7@Gmail.com

CCB-GTT Backgrounder:

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

GTT is an exciting initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind, founded in Ottawa in 2011 by Kim Kilpatrick and Ellen Goodman.  GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision in their exploration of low vision and blindness related access technology.  Through involvement with GTT participants can learn from and discuss assistive technology with others walking the same path of discovery.

GTT is made up of blindness related assistive technology users, and those who have an interest in using assistive technology designed to help blind and vision impaired people level the playing field.  GTT groups interact through social media, and periodically meet in-person or by teleconference to share their passions for assistive technology and to learn what others can offer from their individual perspectives.

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

Windows From the Keyboard Tips, Enable BCC field in Outlook, July 1, 2020

Hello. This is Gerry Chevalier from the GTT Edmonton Chapter. This weekly blog provides tips that I find useful as a keyboard user of Windows. The information is for Windows10 and Office 365, although many tips still apply to older versions. The tips do not require a screen reader unless specifically noted. Thus, the tips apply whether you are a keyboard user or low vision mouse user. Here is this week’s tip.
Outlook – How to Enable the BCC Field
Microsoft Outlook does not provide the BCC field by default. If you want to use the BCC field, you need to enable it as follows:
• Open a new message window.
• Press Alt+P to open the Options menu of the ribbon.
• Tab multiple times to reach the “Show Fields” item and press spacebar to enable the BCC button.
• Press Escape to exit the ribbon and return to your message.
Note that this need only be done once. Outlook will now offer the BCC field on all new messages.

CCB-GTT Windows from the Keyboard Tips Summary Notes, Microsoft Ribbons, June 17, 2020 with a Link to the CCB Podcast Episode

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

Summary Notes:

June 24, 2020

Theme: Microsoft Ribbons

Use the above link to play and/or download the CCB Podcast.

Presenter: Gerry Chevalier

Gtt.edmonton@gmail.com

In this 19 minute 8th episode of the Windows from the Keyboard series, Gerry discusses Microsoft ribbons. He explains how to navigate the ribbons and execute ribbon commands. He also shows how to use the Quick Access Tool Bar, and how to search for ribbon commands and get help using the Tell Me What You Want To Do search tool.

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators/Trainers:

Kim Kilpatrick 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 513

GTTProgram@Gmail.com

David Green 1-877-304-0968 Ext. 509

AccessibilityTraining7@Gmail.com

CCB-GTT Backgrounder:

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

GTT is an exciting initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind, founded in Ottawa in 2011 by Kim Kilpatrick and Ellen Goodman.  GTT aims to help people who are blind or have low vision in their exploration of low vision and blindness related access technology.  Through involvement with GTT participants can learn from and discuss assistive technology with others walking the same path of discovery.

GTT is made up of blindness related assistive technology users, and those who have an interest in using assistive technology designed to help blind and vision impaired people level the playing field.  GTT groups interact through social media, and periodically meet in-person or by teleconference to share their passions for assistive technology and to learn what others can offer from their individual perspectives.

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net