CCB-GTT Weekly Meetings, April 11 to April 17, 2021 via Zoom

You are invited to the CCB’s GTT Zoom meetings where we focus in on the technology needs and concerns of Canadians who are blind or low vision.  The calls will take place over the accessible Zoom Conference system, which will allow participants to dial in using their landline phones, smart phones, or computers.  You will find the Zoom link and phone numbers below the meeting listings. Please pay special attention to the “(NOTE)” notation after some of the meeting listings. Different zoom platforms are used for different meetings and some require preregistration.

CCB-GTT OPEN CHAT

Monday, April 12, 2021, 1:00 PM Eastern/10:00 AM Pacific:

Host: Kim Kilpatrick

Topic: Open tech chat

CCB-GTT MAC USERS GROUP

Tuesday, April 13, 2021, 2:00 PM Eastern/11:00 AM Pacific:

Host: Wayne Antle

Topic: In this session, we will discuss and give tips for using apple mail on the mac.

(NOTE) preregistration required. Mac users only please. If you are using a mac currently and are not already registered for these sessions, e-mail Kim at gtt@ccbnational.net

CCB-GTT PRESENTATION

Wednesday, April 14, 2021, 1:00 PM Eastern/10:00 AM Pacific:

Presenter: Wayne Antle

Topic: Twitter, what is it, how does it work, how accessible is it?

CCB-GTT NATIONAL CALL

Wednesday, April 14, 2021, 7:00 PM Eastern/4:00 PM Pacific:

Presenter: Bryan Wolynski, O.D. Clinical & Professional Relations, OrCam Technologies

Topic: OrCam

OrCam Technologies utilizes the power of computer vision to develop personal AI wearable and handheld assistive technologies. Their devices include the wearable OrCam MyEye and the handheld OrCam Read both developed for people who are blind, visually impaired or have reading difficulties. Both devices utilize a 13 megapixel camera which captures “visual information” and conveys the data auditorily. This presentation, given by a low vision optometrist and a representative of the OrCam company will discuss OrCam’s technology, user case examples and its benefits, giving people independence and empowering people to meet their goals.

website, http://www.orcam.com

CCB-GTT BRAILLE TECH USERS

Thursday, April 15, 2021, 2:30 PM Eastern/11:30 AM Pacific:

Host: Kim Kilpatrick

Q and A session based on what we have worked on and practiced.

(NOTE) preregistration required. For zoom info and/or if you are not already registered, contact Kim at gtt@ccbnational.net

CCB-GTT YOUTH ZOOM CALL

Thursday, April 15, 2021, 8:00 PM Eastern/5:00 PM Pacific:

Host: Nolan Jenikov

For individuals between the ages of 16 and 25ish.

(NOTE) The meeting credentials are different for this meeting, preregistration required. For more info contact Nolan at nolan.gtt@ccbnational.net.

CCB-GTT OPEN CHAT

Friday, April 16, 2021, 1:00 PM Eastern/10:00 AM Pacific:

Host: David Greene

Topic: Open discussion

CCB-GTT PODCASTS

You can subscribe to the CCB Podcast feed by searching for CCB/Canadian Council of the Blind Podcast on the Victor Reader Stream, or your favorite smart device Pod Catcher. You can use this like to the originating distribution source. https://ccbpod.podbean.com/

New this week, Windows Screen Reader Experience, an overview

New last week, Envision AI glasses & SuperSense

CCB-GTT TECH SUPPORT LIST

CCB sponsors a GTT email support list to provide help and support with technology for blind and low vision Canadians. To subscribe to the email list, send an empty email to: GTTsupport+subscribe@groups.io

You will get an email back from the list asking you to confirm your subscription. Simply reply to that email and you are subscribed. You will then receive a second email welcoming you to the list and describing how to use it. You are then ready to post your technology questions and/or answers to the list.

For more information visit: https://groups.io/g/GTTsupport

Security procedure remains in effect.

When you enter the waiting room before a meeting, please ensure that you give us a recognizable name. If you are calling for the first time or from a land line, please e-mail the CCB’s Receptionist, (Shelley Morris) ahead of time to let us know your name and number so we will let you in. Shelley’s email is: ccb@ccbnational.net

If you need help doing these things or learning to use zoom, please contact us and we can help you.

You can participate by phone or internet from wherever you are:

 

CCB is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

https://zoom.us/j/9839595688?pwd=N01yeERXQk4rWnhvNCtHTzZwdXcwQT09

Meeting ID: 983 959 5688

Password: 320119

 

Alberta One tap mobile for Smart Phones:

+15873281099,9839595688#

BC One tap mobile for Smart Phones:

+17789072071,9839595688#

Manitoba One tap mobile for Smart Phones:

+12045151268,9839595688#

Montreal One tap mobile for Smart Phones:

+14388097799,9839595688#

Toronto One tap mobile for Smart Phones:

+16473744685,9839595688#

 

Direct Dial:

Alberta: +1 587 328 1099

BC: +1 778 907 2071

Manitoba: +1 204 515 1268

Montreal: +1 438 809 7799

Toronto: +1 647 374 4685

 

For more information, contact:

Kim Kilpatrick, CCB GTT Coordinator

GTTProgram@Gmail.com

1-877-304-0968 Ext 513

David Greene, CCB GTT Accessibility Trainer

accessibilitytraining7@gmail.com

1-877-304-0968 Ext 509

Corry Stuive, CCB National Program Coordinator

corry.gtt@ccbnational.net 

1-877-304-0968 Ext 550

 

 

GTT Toronto Meeting Notes January 21, 2016 about social media

Here are the notes from the GTT Toronto meeting which took place on Thursday January 21, 2016. The topic was social media. 
Hello everyone,

Here are the notes from last night’s meeting.

Jason Fayre opened the meeting with a welcome, and said that next month’s meeting would have as its focus low tech kitchen gadgets presented by Donna Jodhan. He introduced Rylan Vroom, assistive technology instructor at Balance for Blind Adults, to talk about social media.

 

Rylan began by saying he’d be discussing Facebook, twitter and LinkedIn.

There are two main ways to access Facebook on the computer. There’s Facebook mobile, and regular Facebook. Facebook mobile is good because it doesn’t show graphics, is low bandwidth, and more blind friendly. M.facebook.com. He did a demo starting at the top of the page. Near the top is an edit field to search for a person. Facebook supports hot keys. If you have new messages, you’ll see it indicated near the top. Chat is the cool section where you can chat with anyone you know who’s on line. The pages link allows you to administrate any pages you manage. He talked about how you can choose who you share your posts with, friends, friends of friends, or public. Below this is an edit field where you can enter the text of your post, photos etc.. Below this are birthday notifications of your friends. Below this are all the posts of people you follow. They are displayed as heading level 3, so you can use H to move through them. Lots of people use hashtags, which are best viewed on a Braille display. Posts will show you when a post was posted, and who it was posted to. Using H is generally a good way to navigate through the home page. At the bottom of the main page is a “see more stories” link. Entering on the profile link takes you to your profile. Using H here will display your most recent posts. On the message page, you can use B for button or E for edit field, to move through your messages.

 

He next went to the regular Facebook page. It allows you to access your privacy settings, which is harder to do on the mobile page. Ian raised the concern that sometimes Facebook system updates can set security settings back to default. Brian M offered the adage that if you post something you should probably be prepared for the entire world to see it. Rylan added, “If you wouldn’t send it to your grandmother, don’t post it.” Brian added that Facebook has gotten better at emailing when they change their security protocols.

 

Poking is a strange form of Facebook flirting. It allows a temporary exchange of profiles.

You’ll also get a list of updates from Facebook groups you’ve joined. In general, the full site has much more stuff than the mobile site. Debbie asked if uploaded photos get automatically rotated to appear correctly. Rylan answered that he didn’t know, but that he suspects Facebook will correct mistakes in uploading. He warned that if you forget your Facebook password, the process for verifying yourself involves having to identify photos of your friends, so as a blind person, this is a problem. Neila raised the idea of using the ap on a mobile device. Rylan said the down side of this is that the mobile ap often malfunctions, and that entering posts on a touch pad can be tiresome. In general though it is workable, and can do things like geotag your photos. Brian M added that the mobile ap can deal with the password problem by sending you a text for verification. Ian proposed that you can hook up a blue tooth keyboard to your mobile device to make it easier to post. Judith wondered why she gets so many emails telling her about things on Facebook. Rylan replied that it’s because she’s not logging in enough, and that there’s a link in Facebook emails to change your subscription preferences, i.e. what kinds of emails you get from Facebook. Debbie asked for clarification, with a phone, are you using the ap, or the Facebook mobile site. Rylan replied that this is a matter of preference. The ap is different in how you interact with it, and special things may need to happen if you’re using a Braille display.

 

Twitter is completely different, it’s a micro-blogging site. Twitter is evolving, but at its base it’s a micro-blogging platform. One of its most powerful features is the ability to index specific topics, i.e. hashtags. You can search for a hashtag and find any tweets using this hashtag, i.e. talking about the same thing. Hashtags are ever-changing and time and context related, so you have to watch what you’re doing. Under windows there are a couple of twitter clients, which are ways to use twitter. TWBlue and Chicken Nugget are two that blind people use. You can also access twitter directly from the twitter website. Night Owl is a client for Macs. Twitterific is a good ap for the iPhone. Jason said Tweetings is a useful android ap. The twitter ap for iPhone is sort of accessible, but not entirely.

 

He did a demo of Chicken Nugget. He did a search for the hashtag A11Y which is a short form for accessibility. This opens a buffer with a vertical list of tweets about A11Y. He showed some of the menu functions, example search, either for a person or a hashtag, updating your profile, how to manage audio that might come attached to a tweet, managing the audio cues that Chicken Nugget uses to convey information…. You can directly message someone on twitter if they’re following you. There are hot keys for most functions, and you can hide the visual window, meaning that you can operate twitter without it showing on your screen. You can directly access links included in tweets. If you choose to follow someone on twitter, this means you see everything they post publicly. There’s some twitter etiquette that they’ll follow you back, unless they’re a celebrity. He demonstrated looking up someone’s profile. This displays information about them such as a bio, and where they are in the world. Debbie asked how to shorten a URL to put into a tweet. Rylan answered that some twitter clients will do it automatically, or you can look up a good URL shortener. The @ at symbol relates to users, the # number symbol relates to hashtags. Debbie made the point that lists can be a really helpful way to categorize the information or topics you follow. She asked if you can add an account to a list without actually following it. A few people answered that you can. Neila asked if there’s any user guides. Rylan answered that each twitter client has their own. Brian commented that the twitter website is completely usable, but twitter clients are much faster, especially if you’re very active on twitter. He also added that twitter isn’t mere fluff. You can get lots of information that’s relevant to you, network, ask for tips or help with something specific, and get really quick answers. It’s an extremely useful tool. Rylan said this is true, and the trick is taking the time and effort to curate it all.

 

LinkedIn is more of a business networking site. You can find jobs, connect with fellow professionals, and find articles on profession related topics. It’s entirely different from Facebook, because it’s very profession oriented. He did a demo of the site. Never use LinkedIn with internet explorer, because the LinkedIn site has useful tags with key strokes and accessibility information, and older versions of IE can’t handle them. LinkedIn is good at making connections between you and people you might know. The main page looks somewhat like facebook’s, with profile and update options. Neila raised the point that you can join groups in LinkedIn, and endorse the skills of people you know. Debbie asked if the mobile site is easier, and also is there an easier way to follow conversations on LinkedIn. Brian M said he finds the iPhone ap significantly easier when following and interacting with conversations.

GTT Ottawa Meeting Minutes and upcoming GTT Ottawa.

So sorry for the delay in these.

Our notetaker’s minutes got eaten by an ipad and we had to reconstruct.

Topic for the night continuation of facebook, twitter, presentations in small groups. Rebecca is once again presenting on twitter. Leona will present on facebook. Richard reminded us that the tech fair will once again take place at city hall in September. He also has obtained a grant to expand what they can offer. If anyone has any suggestions for vendors and/or workshops, please contact Richard Marsolais at 613-563-4021  or richard.marsolais@cnib.ca 
Radio camps will once again be taking place in the summer of 2015.  The location will be CKCU on the campus of Carleton University. The first camp will be for people under age 21 who are blind or have low vision.  The dates for this camp will be June 29 and 30, July 2 and 3.  The week will culminate in a 2 hour live on air radio show.  People will learn to audio edit, conduct arterviews, choose music, and more.  For more information contact Kim Kilpatrick at 613-567-0311 or gttprogram@gmail.com
From August 4 to 8 we will have a second radio camp for people over 21 who are blind or have low vision.  Again, the week will finish with an on air show.  If you are interested contact Kim. 
Vangellis gave us both good and bad tech news.  His braille display from humanware (brailliant) was broken and will cost quite a lot to fix. Some people commented that the brailliant displays are not working so well lately.  However, there has been a recent update to their software so perhaps this has been improved. 
In good news, Vangelis acquired a new copy of Kurzweil 1000 and is very happy with the way it is working. 
Kim, Wayne, Pierre and others have continued to work with Steve Sleigh at CRA to help make income tax filing more accessible. Note: Kim did a presentation for developers of tax software at CRA on June 3 2015.  It went very well and they were very curious about accessible  software and how Kim and Steve (who has low vision) accessed web sites. 
Our topic for GTT on June 15 will be the AODA (access for Ontarians with disabilities act) and Leona is arranging for a presenter. 
George from CCB recorded the GTT meeting and 2 people listened on the youtube channel.  This worked well for the presenters but the microphone for the whole room was not working well and it was hard to hear. 
George has a new and better microphone and will be recording this again on June 15. 
If anyone wants to listen in on the presentation and cannot make the meeting, please let Kim know. 
We are thinking of having pizza before the June 15 GTT. 
This would be at 5 PM. 
If you are interested, you would need to pay  for your own pizza.  Let Kim know your thoughts on this. 
Should we have GTT in the summer?  Perhaps just a drop in?  Let Kim know your thoughts on this. 
Voice dream writer is an excellent app for writing and taking notes.  Some people have requested a workshop on this app.  If you are interested in this, let Kim know. 
Leona did a small group facebook presentation answering people’s questions.  Rebecca did a small group twitter presentation answering questions as well. 


GTT Ottawa Meeting Minutes and upcoming GTT Ottawa.

So sorry for the delay in these.

Our notetaker’s minutes got eaten by an ipad and we had to reconstruct.

Topic for the night continuation of facebook, twitter, presentations in small groups. Rebecca is once again presenting on twitter. Leona will present on facebook. Richard reminded us that the tech fair will once again take place at city hall in September. He also has obtained a grant to expand what they can offer. If anyone has any suggestions for vendors and/or workshops, please contact Richard Marsolais at 613-563-4021  or richard.marsolais@cnib.ca 
Radio camps will once again be taking place in the summer of 2015.  The location will be CKCU on the campus of Carleton University. The first camp will be for people under age 21 who are blind or have low vision.  The dates for this camp will be June 29 and 30, July 2 and 3.  The week will culminate in a 2 hour live on air radio show.  People will learn to audio edit, conduct arterviews, choose music, and more.  For more information contact Kim Kilpatrick at 613-567-0311 or gttprogram@gmail.com
From August 4 to 8 we will have a second radio camp for people over 21 who are blind or have low vision.  Again, the week will finish with an on air show.  If you are interested contact Kim. 
Vangellis gave us both good and bad tech news.  His braille display from humanware (brailliant) was broken and will cost quite a lot to fix. Some people commented that the brailliant displays are not working so well lately.  However, there has been a recent update to their software so perhaps this has been improved. 
In good news, Vangelis acquired a new copy of Kurzweil 1000 and is very happy with the way it is working. 
Kim, Wayne, Pierre and others have continued to work with Steve Sleigh at CRA to help make income tax filing more accessible. Note: Kim did a presentation for developers of tax software at CRA on June 3 2015.  It went very well and they were very curious about accessible  software and how Kim and Steve (who has low vision) accessed web sites. 
Our topic for GTT on June 15 will be the AODA (access for Ontarians with disabilities act) and Leona is arranging for a presenter. 
George from CCB recorded the GTT meeting and 2 people listened on the youtube channel.  This worked well for the presenters but the microphone for the whole room was not working well and it was hard to hear. 
George has a new and better microphone and will be recording this again on June 15. 
If anyone wants to listen in on the presentation and cannot make the meeting, please let Kim know. 
We are thinking of having pizza before the June 15 GTT. 
This would be at 5 PM. 
If you are interested, you would need to pay  for your own pizza.  Let Kim know your thoughts on this. 
Should we have GTT in the summer?  Perhaps just a drop in?  Let Kim know your thoughts on this. 
Voice dream writer is an excellent app for writing and taking notes.  Some people have requested a workshop on this app.  If you are interested in this, let Kim know. 
Leona did a small group facebook presentation answering people’s questions.  Rebecca did a small group twitter presentation answering questions as well. 


Useful Resource: Using Twitter on the Pc, iPhone, and mac.

A wonderful GTT participant has written this twitter guide for users who are blind using the PC.

Thank you Rebecca Jackson.  You are amazing.

At the end, I will add some resources for using twitter on the I devices and the mac.

If anyone wants to send me resources about twitter and android, send them to 

gttprogram@gmail.com

 

 

A quick and painless guide to twitter clients on the pc

Before you can understand what a twitter client is, you must first understand the basics of twitter.

What is twitter?

Twitter is a microblogging service that is used to send messages of up to 140 characters.

What is a Tweet?

A tweet is a message of up to 140 characters that you want to send to your followers.

What are followers?

Followers are the people who can see your tweets and respond to them. Anyone can see a twitter profile’s tweets unless the tweets are protected, but your followers will have your tweets show up in your home timeline. The reverse is true for people who you follow. The tweets that you follow will show up in your home timeline.

What is a home timeline?

Home is where all of the tweets that you follow end up. Let’s say that you wanted to read Cbc news every morning. You would first follow Cbc news, and when you went on twitter, all of the tweets from cbc news would show up in your home timeline.

What types of tweets are there?

The first type of tweet there is a simple, basic tweet. You just send out a simple message to your followers that is less than 140 characters.

The second type of tweet is a retweet. Think of the retweet as you sharing a story with a friend, you pass the message along so that your friend and maybe others can hear it. On twitter the retweet serves this purpose. If you see something of interest that someone else has tweeted, you can simply retweet it and all of your followers will see the message.

Talking to people

There are 2 types of messages you can send to other people on twitter. These are mentions and direct messages.

What is a mention?

A mention is a public message you can send out to someone you follow. Everyone can see this message.

What is a direct message?

A direct message is a private message you can send to someone you follow. You and the person you are sending to are the only people who can see this message.

How do I Tweet: What is a twitter client?

A twitter client is a program that interacts with twitter, allowing you to use all the regular functions of twitter, without the pain of using the website.

What twitter clients are out there?

You have several options for twitter clients for the pc, I’ll just cover 3. Chicken nugget, tw blue, and tween.

General info about using clients

All clients require that you authorise the application for use with your twitter account. The application will take you to the twitter website to enter your twitter log in info.

Basic navigation

2 of the  3 twitter clients mentioned, Chicken Nugget and Tw Blue,  use the same principles for navigating. In these  clients you will see buffers that contain your tweets, mentions, direct messages, and so on. To move between buffers press control and windows in combination with the left and right arrows to cycle between buffers when the main window is hidden. 

Chicken Nugget

Although this twitter client has a funny name, it is probably one of the most popular clients out there for blind people. It has a few customisable options such as support for a service that lets you lengthen your tweets, and lots of other features.  You can download a free trial version of the product here

https://q-continuum.net/chicken_nugget/download

The application costs $15 and the trial version is 29 days. You can view your tweets in a window or use the hide window feature that lets you read tweets from within any application. Commands for tweeting can be found in the menus. Use alt and the arrow keys to cycle through the menus if you are using a screen reader.

Tween

Tween is another twitter client. It is very popular in Japan, and just happens to be accessible. It is also free. Unlike some of the other clients, tween does not have a hidden window feature, meaning that you can’t navigate buffers with control, windows, and the left and right arrows from another application. Here is a resource that contains some basic keystrokes, as well as addons that make this client nicer to use with screen readers.

http://www.dlee.org/tween/resources.htm

note: The resource  page isn’t ladled properly. Also note that in order to write a basic tweet  you type in the text field ladled 140.

Tw blue

This client is also free, and is still somewhat under development. It has some of the features of Chicken Nugget, including the fact that it streams your tweets instantly, meaning that you will get them as soon as someone sends one. It also has a main window and menu system, as well as a hide window option. It can be downloaded at 

http://twblue.es/?q=node/1

You can find a read me here

http://twblue.es/?q=node/5

happy tweeting!

 

Twitter on I Devices

 

 

Using twitter on I devices is very accessible.

There are a few apps that people who are blind use including:

twitterrific and tweetlist

They can both be found by searching in the app store.

There is a charge for these apps.

The twitter app (made by twitter itself) is free and has become very accessible.

It can be found in the app store as well.

On the mac, there is a paid app called night owl.

It is very accessible and many mac users use it easily.

At our national teleconference call in May (may 13 2015) we will be discussing Facebook, twitter, and linked in.

If you are interested in participating, let us know.