GTT British Columbia Meeting Agenda, Accessible BC Act Consultation for Residents who are Blind and Partially Sighted, November 18, 2019

Get Together with Technology (GTT) BC

 

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind

 

Theme: Accessible BC Act Consultation

 

Date: Monday, November 18, 2019

Time: 6:00 until 8:00 PM Pacific Time

Where: GTT Program Zoom Conference Room

 

Meeting Agenda:

Please Join Us and Have Your Voice Heard!

 

Accessibility through Legislation – Government of British Columbia

A Consultation and discussion with People from the blind, low vision and Guide Dog Community throughout British Columbia.

 

Purpose of meeting: to express what is most important to us as British Columbians who are blind, deaf-blind or partially sighted about accessibility, inclusion and full participation in our communities.

 

Your interaction during this meeting will be included in a final report to the Accessible BC Act consultation process currently underway by SPARC BC.  The BC Coalition of Dog Guide users and the CCB are engaging the vision loss community with 5 meetings throughout the province with a view to ensuring that our voices aren’t missed during the general consultation planned and facilitated by SPARC.

 

To learn more:

BC Government Accessibility Legislation Intro:

https://engage.gov.bc.ca/accessibility

 

link to alternate format Accessible consultation documents

https://nnels.ca/items/british-columbia-framework-accessibility-legislation

 

To Learn More Contact:

Heather Walkus at the BCCoalition@hooh.ca

 

The call-in info is:

 

Join the GTT National Conference Call Zoom Meeting from computer or smart phone:

https://zoom.us/j/9839595688

 

One tap mobile, Toronto Local:

+16475580588,,9839595688# Canada

 

Toronto Local:

+1 647 558 0588

Meeting ID: 983 959 5688

 

For More Information:

Contact Albert Ruel at 250-240-2343, or at,

Albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

 

CCB Backgrounder:

 

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

 

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detectio to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

 

 

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: http://www.ccbnational.net

GTT Duncan Meeting Agenda, Reading News and Other Information Online, November 14, 2019

Get Together with Technology (GTT) Duncan

 

An Initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind,

in Partnership with the

Vancouver Island Regional Library, N. Cowichan Branch

 

Theme: Reading News and Other Information Online using PC and Smart Tablets/Phones

Date:  November 14, 2019

Time:  4:00 PM to 6:00 PM

Where: Vancouver Island Regional Library, N. Cowichan Branch

2687 James Street Duncan BC

 

First Hour:

Michelle Creedy will lead a discussion on strategies, tips and technology used to access all the vital information available online, like News, equipment Manuals, Recipes and important Government information.

Second Hour:

If time permits we will open the floor for anything technology related on the minds of the attendees.

 

For More Information:

Contact Albert Ruel at 250-240-2343, or by email at Albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

 

CCB Backgrounder:

 

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

 

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

 

 

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: http://www.ccbnational.net

 

Guest Post: Teleconference Workshop: Braille is Best: Out and About – Everyday Strategies for Advocating for the Use of Braille, Braille Literacy Canada, November 30, 2019

Braille is Best: Out and About —
Everyday Strategies for Advocating for the Use of Braille

Inclusion of braille and braille accessibility is an ongoing challenge for those who read braille. Have you ever encountered a situation when braille was simply overlooked and you were asked if braille copy was really necessary?

Join us for the next teleconference where our knowledgeable panelists will share their experiences advocating for braille in post-secondary education and in everyday life. Whether you’re a braille reader, a parent or a professional in the blindness field the solutions and strategies we’ll discuss will equip you to advocate for braille literacy wherever it’s needed.

Date: Saturday, November 30, 2019

Time: 1:00 – 2:30 PM Eastern (Starting at 10 AM Pacific, 11 AM Mountain, 12 Noon Central/Saskatchewan and 2 PM Atlantic)

Cost: The teleconference is free for BLC members as well as those who are members of organizations that are corporate members of BLC.  Cost for non-members is $20.

To Register: send an email to info@blc-lbc.ca by Thursday, November 28, 2019.

GTT National Conference Call Agenda, Copyright and Accessing Links to Articles, November 13, 2019

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

National Teleconference Call

 

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind

 

You’re invited to the CCB’s November 13, 2019 GTT National conference call meeting:

 

Theme: Copyright and Accessing Links to Articles,!

 

Hour One:

Kim Kilpatrick, Brian Bibeault and Albert Ruel will demonstrate how to legally share copyrighted material to members of the GTT network, and how to access the links to the full articles shared through blog posts and email messages.  Using iOS and PC browsers we will show you how to use the Reader View to strip out extraneous links, controls and advertisements so that online reading can be done with ease.

Hour Two:

If time allows we will discuss anything else technology related that participants may wish to raise, so bring your ideas, concerns and nuggets of brilliance to share with us.

 

You can participate by phone or internet from wherever you are:

 

Date: October 9, 2019

Time: 4:00–5:30 PM Pacific Time, 7:00-8:30 PM Eastern Time

 

The call-in info is:

 

Join the GTT National Conference Call Zoom Meeting from computer or smart phone:

https://zoom.us/j/9839595688

 

One tap mobile, Toronto Local:

+16475580588,,9839595688# Canada

 

Toronto Local:

+1 647 558 0588

Meeting ID: 983 959 5688

 

For more information, contact:

Kim Kilpatrick, GTT East Coordinator

GTTProgram@Gmail.com

1-877-304-0968 Ext 513

 

Albert Ruel, GTT West Coordinator

albert.GTT@CCBNational.net

1-877-304-0968 Ext 550

 

CCB Backgrounder:

 

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

 

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

 

 

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: http://www.ccbnational.neta

 

 

CCB-GTT Parksville and The Technology Learning Center Sponsors, Reading News Articles with PC and iOS Browsers Workshop, November 19, 2019

Get Together with Technology (GTT)

Parksville Workshop

November 19, 2019

 

Sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB)

in partnership with

The Technology Learning Centre

Building Learning Together

 

Theme: Reading Online News Articles with PC and iOS Browsers.

Please RSVP

 

Please share with anyone who might benefit!

 

  • Are you finding it increasingly difficult to read print newspapers and magazines, or articles online from your smart tablet, phone or computer as a result of reduced vision, eye fatigue, or blindness?
  • Are all those website controls and advertisements keeping you from enjoying news articles online?
  • Is the text too small, or contrast not sharp enough for reading long news articles when accessing them online from your smart tablet, smart phone or computer?
  • Would you like to have your favourite news articles read aloud to you from your smart tablet, phone or computer?

 

If you’ve answered yest to any of the above questions we have the workshop just for you!

 

Date: November 19, 2019; 1:00 until 2:30 PM

Place: Technology Learning Centre, 494 Bay Avenue Parksville

 

On the above date the staff and volunteers at the Technology Learning Centre, along with Albert Ruel from the Canadian Council of the Blind will show you how to resolve all the above issues so that reading/listening will become effortless and enjoyable again.

 

The features, strategies and techniques we will demonstrate and teach are referred to as Reader View/Simplified View, and they’re already built into the web browsers you know and love.  Those web browsers are, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge and Safari.

 

Bring your smart tablet, smart phone or computer to the workshop and someone will assist you in learning how best to configure the device for easy reading, and how to bring out the power of Reader View built into the browsers you have on your device.

 

Space is limited so please RSVP your intentions, and let us know which device you will bring, or want to learn about.

 

To RSVP or for more information please contact:

Albert Ruel, Get Together with Technology Coordinator

Canadian Council of the Blind

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968,550                         Cell: 250-240-2343

Email: albert.GTT@CCBNational.net               URL: http://www.GTTProgram.Blog

 

Brian Collicott, Technology Learning Centre Coordinator

Building Learning Together

Phone: 250-947-8258                                      Email: BCollicott@SD69.bc.ca

URL: http://www.OBLT.ca/TLC

 

CCB Backgrounder:

 

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

 

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

 

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: http://www.ccbnational.net

 

 

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Apps round up November 4, 2019

November 04, 2019

Apps round up

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to introduce you to my apps roundup.

Enjoy!

 

  1. Button by Neatebox (iOS, Free)

18 years working for Guide Dogs for the Blind watching my blind and visually impaired friends struggle to interact with pedestrian crossings prompted me to look for a solution which would make the lives of all disabled people easier in this area.  Many crossings poles are out of reach or too far from the crossing to be useful so I set up Neatebox and looked for a way in which we could press the button at the crossing using our mobile phones.  “Button” by Neatebox is the result of this hard work and gives you a hands-free remote crossing control from your phone. It removes the need for you to make physical contact with the crossing pole and leaves you free to focus on a safe and efficient crossing.

 

Simply download the free app and input your details and you are ready to go.  At this time there are limited locations in which the system can be used but we are keen to install more. If you feel that a crossing near you could do with an innovative solution such as this please let us know using the ‘request a crossing’ feature within the app’s settings and we will contact the Local Authority on your behalf to ask for our system to be installed.

 

Current Version: 1.02 (February 1, 2018)

Read Button by Neatebox’s AppleVis App Directory entry for more information:

Visit Button by Neatebox’s App Store page:

 

  1. Welcome by Neatebox

(iOS, Free)

Do you feel that society has disabled you and hinders you from receiving the level of customer service you would like?

 

“Welcome” by Neatebox aims to redress this balance and provides you with an effective communication tool which can help customer service teams give you the support you deserve.

 

Simply download the free app, input your details, specify your needs and plan your first trip.

 

Please request any venues you would like to see included and remember there is strength in numbers so invite your friends and request together for greater impact.

 

Current Version: 1.9.0 (July 24, 2019)

Read Welcome by Neatebox’s AppleVis App Directory entry for more information:

Visit Welcome by Neatebox’s App Store page:

 

All recent app entries posted to AppleVis can be found at:

iOS:

Mac:

Apple Watch:

Apple TV:

 

That’s it from me for this week.

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

Now you  can subscribe to “‘Let’s Talk Tips”‘ which is my monthly resource for the most current and reliable informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media, Business, and Advocacy.

http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

Airacast Episode 20 Aira’s Street Crossing Policy

Hi all.  I listened to this podcast yesterday and got the low-down on how Aira has changed their street crossing policy.  Previously their Agents wouldn’t talk to you at all when you were crossing streets, however as of November 4, 2019 they are offering limited information during street crossings if you ask for it.  To me this is a huge game changer.  Check out the podcast link below.

 

https://overcast.fm/+QWHMkaT2M

 

Thx, Albert

 

How to Protect Company/Individual Copyright when sharing written/recorded material to GTT Networks

Protecting Copyright when sharing written material to GTT Networks:

 

Hi all.  It recently came to our attention that GTT contributors, including yours truly, aren’t always operating under established strict rules for sharing Copyrighted material from other sources to the GTTSupport list and GTTProgram Blog.  I will attempt to lay out what I think are some of the ways we can all continue to benefit from the sharing of great and notable articles without infringing on the creator’s ownership Rights.

 

It’s not appropriate to copy and paste entire articles even if the link to the original source is provided.  Essentially, online content has the same Copyright protection as any original image, writing, or recording.  This means that “Fair Use” rules apply, which allows you to quote brief excerpts verbatim from Copyrighted content for purposes such as criticism, news reporting, teaching and research.  For online use, the basic rule of thumb is that quoting 2 or 3 paragraphs is acceptable, and that it still needs to be wrapped in original content of your own.

 

For example, in the case of software releases, you should write a summary of your own, include some selected quotes from the article/release, and direct readers to the original source for more information by providing a web link.

 

In researching the “Fair Use” Rules where they pertain to Copyright I came across this article and appreciated how simply it lays out the rules and some of the ways they can be applied.  As the GTTSupport email list and the GTTProgram Blog were established as peer mentoring tools aimed at allowing us to teach and support each other around the use of assistive technology, I believe we fall under the following bullet point, “copying a few paragraphs from a news article for use by a teacher or student in a lesson…”.

 

What Is Fair Use? – Copyright Overview by Rich Stim – Stanford Copyright and Fair Use Center

 

“Commentary and Criticism

If you are commenting upon or critiquing a copyrighted work—for instance, writing a book review—fair use principles allow you to reproduce some of the work to achieve your purposes. Some examples of commentary and criticism include:

  • quoting a few lines from a Bob Dylan song in a music review
  • summarizing and quoting from a medical article on prostate cancer in a news report
  • copying a few paragraphs from a news article for use by a teacher or student in a lesson, or
  • copying a portion of a Sports Illustrated magazine article for use in a related court case.

The underlying rationale of this rule is that the public reaps benefits from your review, which is enhanced by including some of the copyrighted material. Additional examples of commentary or criticism are provided in the examples of fair use cases.”

 

Here is the link to the entire article:

https://fairuse.stanford.edu/overview/fair-use/what-is-fair-use/

 

Sample CCB Reference:

Below is a sample of a properly referenced comment Regarding a News article about CCB.

 

It was great to read in the below article how over 150 people crowded a Vancouver area community center to give the BC Government their views on what should be in a future Accessible BC Act, slated to be tabled in the BC Legislature during the Fall 2020 session.  Here’s how the CCB is being pro-active toward the recognition of our rights as British Columbians with disabilities.

 

British Columbians pack meeting to help develop accessibility law | Vancouver Sun

NICK EAGLAND

 

“Conway said he has visited hotels with elevators which do not have Braille labels on their buttons. Grocery and drug stores have replaced human cashiers with self-checkout machines which have touchscreens he can’t use. Businesses have refused to allow DA Chief to enter, breaking the law.

Strong enforcement is key to making the legislation work, said Conway, who is the 2nd vice-president of the Canadian Council of the Blind’s B.C.-Yukon division.”

 

The entire article will be found here:

https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/b-c-government-holds-vancouver-community-meeting-on-accessibility-legislation

 

Thx, Albert

 

 

 

GTT Nat Con Call Summary Notes, iOS 13, the Good and the Bad, 2019Oct09

GTT National Conference Call.

An Initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind

 

Summary Notes

October 9, 2019

 

Theme: Apple’s iOS 13 update, the good, the bad and the ugly.

 

On October 9, 2019 the GTT National Conference Call discussed the above topic with the help of the below presenters, which was followed by a number of spirited questions from the floor.  The presenters were asked to talk about 3 of the things they like and don’t like about the version being used on that date, namely iOS 13.1.2.  Since then additional updates have been released so depending on the date you read these Summary Notes your experience may be different.

 

To learn more about iOS 13 visit this Apple Website:

 

To access many fantastic iOS 13 AppleVis Podcasts follow this link:

 

Presenters: Michael Feir, Elmer Thiesen, Tom Dekker, Kim Kilpatrick, Brian Bibeault and David Green.

 

Please check out the presentation on the CCB Podcast below for more details.

10 GTT National Conference Call, iOS 13, the Good and the Bad, October 9, 2019

 

Michael Feir:

  • Michael expressed frustration over the hang-up bug, and suggested that in iOS 13.1.2 users can use triple click on the home button three times to turn off Voice Over, which always resolves the freeze being experienced.
  • To set the triple tap on the Home or Side buttons to Voice Over do the following: Go to Settings, Accessibility and select the Accessibility Shortcut to launch Voice Over.
  • Be careful not to accidently click the button five times in a row without sufficient pause or you can activate the SOS call to 911.
  • Custom Controls Can Be used to limit or expand the haptic feedback and sounds given off by iOS 13 devices. The user can also re-define existing gestures, and define undefined gestures to functions that are difficult to manage, like the turning of the Rotor dial.
  • The Reminders app is another area where iOS 13 has made great strides. It is far more customizable and configurable to the needs of the end user. It now boasts some project management features that make it really good to use.

 

Elmer Thiesen:

  • Elmer indicated that for him the ability to customize gestures is a really big deal, and the first one he changed was the Rotor gesture to use two fingers sliding across the screen left or right to turn it in those directions.
  • He also expressed that the Vertical Scroll Bar is a great addition to iOS 13. It allows the user to scroll pages of information far more easily and efficiently.
  • Elmer likes the ability to establish Activities with desired features like, having a specific voice read emails with no punctuation, and another voice work on word processing apps with all punctuation turned on. These can now be customized to the user’s preference.
  • One of the bugs Elmer has struggled with is that Siri would get lost in what she was asked to access and keep repeating the same irrelevant thing over and over again until he re-set the Network Settings. Apple Support assisted in getting this sorted out.

 

Tom Dekker:

  • Screen Recording is the thing Tom likes most about the upgrade to iOS 13. it never quite worked well before iOS 13, and now works very well with good quality sound.
  • Commands and the ability to customize them is another of Tom’s favourite things about iOS 13.
  • On Screen Braille keyboard is better than ever. He can now type more quickly and with more accuracy than before.
  • Tom thinks that a weird thing is the iPhone User Guide downloaded to the iOS Books app. It only reads the first line or two of each paragraph. It doesn’t track anything correctly. Older Guides work well, but not this one.

 

Kim Kilpatrick:

  • Kim agreed that the iOS 13 User Guide doesn’t work well.
  • As for the hang-up bug, her experience seems to be that it only happens when she uses the microphone button on the wired earbuds. She also indicated that this bug didn’t come up during the beta testing phase, which she has been on since the beginning.
  • Kim expressed that a great feature of iOS 13 is that Accessibility is not buried in General and that it has its own spot in Settings.
  • Kim has heard that Low Vision users are liking the Dark Mode offered in iOS 13.
  • She indicated that there are some good things added to Braille support that allows Voice Over to have more things read back to the user as they type, however a bug seems to have been introduced that creates a disconnect when back spacing to delete errors. Kim also agrees that Braille Screen Input has improved dramatically.
  • Voice Control is another item Kim appreciates about iOS 13. Although it isn’t a Voice Over specific feature, it never-the-less works well with it, and it will really help those with limited hand function to access even more functions of their iOS devices. Voice Over users must use earbuds when accessing Voice Controls otherwise the Voice Over speech will interfere. The strong point about using Voice Control when dictating in an edit field is that Voice Over will read back what is being dictated periodically. It functions more like Dragon Naturally Speaking in that regard. this should only be used in quiet places otherwise it makes many errors.
  • Kim told the group that in Activities you can also adjust punctuation for different apps and activities according to your personal preferences, the voice, rate and punctuation can all be set for different apps and tasks.

 

David Green:

  • David told the assembled that when inserting passwords and code numbers for voicemail iOS 13 seems to be far faster in echoing the touch screen presses, which leads to increased accuracy in typing those characters. This is especially noticeable in voicemail entry codes.
  • One bug David noticed is in the Native Mail app. When he tries to move from one account to another focus seems to go into Edit Mode instead of activating the new account. It will also do this in the Messages app sometimes.

 

  • David found that after the upgrade to iOS 13 the speaking voice was changed from his favourite American voice to a British one. The only way to fix this was to set the Location to America in order to get those voices back.
  • Slide to Type is one feature that David will have to practice a lot before it will become comfortable, if it ever does.
  • Many of the new features and functions of iOS 13 are not of interest to David, so he will likely give them a pass.

 

Brian Bibeault:

  • Brian wasn’t going to upgrade yet, however having forgotten to shut off his phone one evening he woke up to an upgraded iPhone. Since this event he has worked at trying to learn its new features and is getting comfortable with them. The first day was a nightmare, but he recommended that anyone intending to make the move go to AppleVis and listen to the many Thomas Domville podcasts about iOS 13. He provides a great set of tutorials and guides to the important features and upgrades.
  • One glitch Brian found is when using the Bluetooth Keyboard, the focus jumps all over the place unexpectedly.
  • Brian suggested that if one is going to use Voice Control, turn it off after using it, otherwise it’ll drive you nuts if you answer a phone call with it still turned on. It’ll keep repeating text not relevant to the conversation.
  • He found that his recent move to Bell Fib Cablevision has improved since iOS 13, whereas the app was not accessible with iOS 12.4.

 

Question Period:

Participants had a range of questions to ask the presenters, for which some found answers and some are yet to be resolved.  To access the remainder of the session please find the complete Podcast recording on the Canadian Council of the Blind Podcast channel.

 

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators:

 

Albert Ruel                   or                               Kim Kilpatrick

1-877-304-0968,550                           1-877-304-0968,513

albert.GTT@CCBNational.net                      GTTProgram@Gmail.com

 

CCB Backgrounder:

 

The CCB was founded in 1944 by a coalition of blind war veterans, schools of the blind and local chapters to create a national self-governing organization. The CCB was incorporated by Letters Patent on May 10, 1950 and is a registered charity under the provisions of the Income Tax Act (Canada).

The purpose of the CCB is to give people with vision loss a distinctive and unique perspective before governments.  CCB deals with the ongoing effects of vision loss by encouraging active living and rehabilitation through peer support and social and recreational activities.

CCB promotes measures to conserve sight, create a close relationship with the sighted community and provide employment opportunities.

 

The CCB recognizes that vision loss has no boundaries with respect to gender, income, ethnicity, culture, other disabilities or age.

The CCB understands in many instances vision loss is preventable and sometimes is symptomatic of other health issues.  For the 21st century, the CCB is committed to an integrated proactive health approach for early detection to improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

As the largest membership organization of the blind and partially sighted in Canada the CCB is the “Voice of the Blind™”.

 

CCB National Office

100-20 James Street Ottawa ON  K2P 0T6

Toll Free: 1-877-304-0968 Email: info@ccbnational.net URL: www.ccbnational.net

 

 

Guest Post: Potential TransLink Bus Service Interruption Due to Strike Action, October 31, 2019

Hi GTT Participants, I share this with you on behalf of TransLink’s Access Transit Coordinator, Richard Marion with a particular emphasis on those who live in, or will soon visit the Lower Mainland area of BC.

 

Hello Community Organization Partners:

 

I’m hoping you can assist us with distributing the following information to your community networks and clients of your organization.

 

This note will provide necessary information in the event of a strike at Coast Mountain Bus Company. We will continue to send information as the situation changes.

 

If you require any further information, please contact Richard Marion at Richard.marion@translink.ca or 778-375-6864

 

Thank you for your assistance.

 

The union representing Coast Mountain Bus Company bus operators and maintenance trades has advised job action in the form of bus maintenance workers not doing overtime work and transit operators not wearing uniforms. This could mean reduction in some bus and SeaBus service as soon as 8 a.m. tomorrow.

 

Regardless of the job action, many of our services will be unaffected: SkyTrain, Canada Line, West Coast Express, HandyDART, West Vancouver Blue Bus and other contracted services will continue operating normally.

 

We will do everything possible to keep our customers informed, as soon as possible, on service disruptions.

 

To stay informed, customers can sign up for Transit Alerts (alerts.translink.ca) specific to their routes, follow @TransLink on Twitter and check translink.ca.

 

Customers should also plan for extra time to get to their destinations.

 

Richard Marion

Access Transit Coordinator

TransLink (South Coast British Columbia Transportation Authority)

#400 – 287 Nelson’s Court| New Westminster, BC | V3L 0E7 | Canada

Tel. 778.375.6864
TransLink.ca

A better place to live, built on transportation excellence