CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Leisure time, August 20, 2018

August 20 2018

Leisure time

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about leisure time.

 

When playing board games, visually impaired people may find it helpful to use dice that  contrast with the color of the board.  Black dice are easier to locate on a white board and vice versa.  Also, don’t be afraid to substitute larger or color-contrasted objects for game pieces that are difficult to locate.  For example, use a thread spool in a color that contrasts with the board for a game piece.

 

A variety of adapted tools such as large print and raised line rulers are also available.

 

Public Libraries have a wide selection of books and magazines in electronic formats.

 

When hand sewing, use a small bowl to keep track of your needle, thread, thimble, etc.

 

Keep a few needles threaded for quick access or use Self Threading Needles (available from sewing shops).

 

Adjustable seam guides that screw onto the flat bed of your sewing machine provide a tactile guide to measure seams. People with low vision may find it useful to place a brightly colored piece of tape on the seam guide.

 

Keep a magnet in your sewing basket to pick up pins and needles.

 

Many people are not aware of all the recreational and leisure resources available in their own community.  Contact your Recreation Department, YWCA, YMCA, Adult Education Association, Church, Women’s Club, Specialty Groups, and Leagues in your area to find out about the programs and activities they offer.

 

With any leisure time activity, from wood working to knitting, begin with very basic techniques and continue to build on your skills.  People with low vision may find it helpful to use contrasting color and/or larger materials, additional lighting and/or magnification.  Take your time and remember, a little patience goes a long way!

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you

will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

GTT Northern Ontario and Rural Meeting Invitation, General Question and Answer Session, August 16, 2018

GTT Northern Ontario and Rural Conference Call

 

An Initiative of the

Canadian Council of the Blind

 

You’re invited to the August monthly Northern Ontario and Rural Get Together with Technology (GTT) teleconference call.

 

Date: Thursday, August 16 at 7 pM Eastern Time.

Theme: General Question and Answer Session

Come join us in this general discussion about any software or device you have or may be interested in purchasing.  Brian Bibeault and Kim Kilpatrick will be on the call and also others in our group who have helpful information to share.

 

Everyone is welcome.

 

Call in information:

1-866-740-1260

Access Code:  5670311#

 

For more information please contact your GTT Coordinators:

 

Albert Ruel                   or                          Kim Kilpatrick

1-877-304-0968,550                      1-877-304-0968,513

albert.GTT@CCBNational.net                GTTProgram@Gmail.com

 

GTT Toronto Summary Notes for the 2017 Fall and 2018 Spring Seasons are Now Available Online

Summary Notes

 

GTT Toronto Adaptive Technology User Group

Posted on August 13, 2018

 

An Initiative of the Canadian Council of the Blind

In Partnership with the CNIB

 

Thanks to Ian White and Jason Fayre for managing and facilitating the GTT Toronto Group we now have access to the great Summary Notes from their entire list of past meetings.

 

GTT Toronto Summary Notes 2017 and 2018

 

 Upcoming Meetings:

  • Next Meeting: Thursday, September 20 at 6pm
  • Location: CNIB Community Hub space at 1525 Yonge Street, just 1 block north of St Clair on the east side of Yonge, just south of Heath.
  • Meetings are held on the third Thursday of the month at 6pm.

 

GTT Toronto Adaptive Technology User Group Overview:

  • GTT Toronto is a chapter of the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB).
  • GTT Toronto promotes a self-help learning experience by holding monthly meetings to assist participants with assistive technology.
  • Each meeting consists of a feature technology topic, questions and answers about technology, and one-on-one training where possible.
  • Participants are encouraged to come to each meeting even if they are not interested in the feature topic because questions on any technology are welcome. The more participants the better able we will be equipped with the talent and experience to help each other.
    • There are GTT groups across Canada as well as a national GTT monthly toll free teleconference. You may subscribe to the National GTT blog to get email notices of teleconferences and notes from other GTT chapters. Visit:

http://www.gttprogram.wordpress.com/

There is a form at the bottom of that web page to enter your email.

 

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Cleaning & laundry, August 6, 2018

August 06 2018

Cleaning & laundry

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about cleaning & laundry.

 

CLEANING & LAUNDRY

Wear an apron with large pockets when cleaning. The pockets may be used to hold cleaning materials such as a dust cloth and polish, or may be used to hold small items you pick up along the way and plan to return to their original storage places.  Likewise, put cleaning materials in a basket or bucket and carry it around the house with you so all materials will be handy as needed.

 

 

Avoid spot cleaning!  Clean the whole surface to ensure no spots are missed.  When cleaning counters, start at one end and work to the other in overlapping strips.  Use your free hand to check areas just cleaned for extra stubborn spots.  Also work in overlapping strips when dusting, vacuuming, washing floors, etc.  In large areas, you may find it helpful to divide the surface into sections such as halves or quarters, with overlapping boundaries.  Use pieces of furniture (for example, a chair in the middle of the kitchen floor), or use permanent fixtures to mark the boundaries of each section you are cleaning.

 

 

 

Transfer liquid cleaners into containers with pumps for easy use.  Containers can be filled with a funnel.  Remember that flat-sided bottles upset easily.

 

To fill a steam iron use a turkey baster, a funnel, or a squirt bottle.

 

Safety pins or Sock Tuckers (available in department stores) can be used to keep socks in pairs during washing and drying.  Some people find it helpful to buy socks in different colors, patterns or textures for sorting purposes.

 

Wash small items in a pillow case or small mesh laundry bag to keep them from getting lost.

 

To measure laundry detergent use the scoop provided. Avoid pouring directly from the box.

 

 

LEISURE TIME!

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

 

CCB Tech Articles, Donna’s Low Tech Tips, The Talking Color Analyzer For People Who Are Blind Or Color-blind, August 13, 2018

August 13 2018

Meet the Talking Color Analyzer For People Who Are Blind Or Color-blind

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about the Talking Color Analyzer For People Who Are Blind Or Color-blind.

 

I am yet to meet this product but I wanted to drop by and introduce it to you.

Why not go out there and make friends with it!

 

+++++++++++++++

 

ColorTest II: Talking Color Analyzer For People Who Are Blind Or Color-blind

ColorTest II is a hand-held device that helps the user distinguish colors independently. It has hundreds of uses at home, work, or school, including selecting your own wardrobe; identifying products from the package color; determining if fruit is ripe; and distinguishing colored folders, forms.

 

Features

Uses a clear human voice to announce the color of any object placed in contact with its sensitive detector.

Senses over 1,000 nuances of color. Also detects patterns, brightness, and contrast.

Can provide color analysis with specific values for brightness, hue, and saturation.

 

Use as a light detector.

Talking clock, calendar, timer, thermometer, and three games

Earphone jack and holes to accommodate a neck loop (earphone not included)

Built-in rechargeable battery with talking battery status

Included

Carrying case

Battery charger

Instructions on cassette, plus a large print and braille “quick start” booklet

One year limited warranty

ColorTest II is about the size of a television remote control and can sense over 1,000 shades of color!

ColorTest II:

Catalog Number: 1-03951-00

Go to the link on the next line to  purchase the ColorTest II: Talking Color Analyzer for People Who Are Blind or Color-blind.

https://shop.aph.org/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_ColorTest%20II:%20Talking%20Color%20Analyzer%20for%20People%20Who%20Are%20Blind%20or%20Color-blind:%20English%20Version_1135898P_10001_11051

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.

1839 Frankfort Avenue

Mailing Address: P. O. Box 6085

Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085

Toll Free: 800-223-1839

Phone: 502-895-2405

Fax: 502-899-2274

E-mail:

info@aph.org

Web site:

http://www.aph.org

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you

will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Talking MP3 Player, July 30, 2018

July 30, 2018

Meet the talking MP3 player

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about the talking MP3 player.

 

Meet the talking MP3 player

 

I have not yet met this nifty little gadget but I could not help but post this article.  I hope that some day soon I can go out there and meet it.  So, enjoy!

 

+++++++++++++++

 

Tiny Tunes: What It Is Really All About

 

By Kelsey, on Mm-friends.

 

Hi,

I’m writing this as a review of the new Tiny Tunes KD1000 Talking

MP3 Player.  As some people are saying that it is great, some

people are saying that it is awful, I thought it would be good

for someone who actually has this player and is not biost on

either side of the marketing trade to review this pocket sized,

lighter shaped device.  Below is a complete guide and report of

the mini machine.

 

Description and General Functions

Tiny Tunes is a very small MP3 player from Future Aids, a

company based in America.  It has a 1 inch screen with 3 bars

underneath the screen, a headphone and usb port on the bottom of

the device and a locking switch on the top.  The bars are the

controls for the player and can be pressed from either the left

or the right side, performing different actions depending on

which side you press.  The top bar when pressed on the left is

play, and the right is mode (select).  The second bar is the

volume bar: You press right to increase the volume and press left

to decrease it.  The third and final bar work the same as arrow

keys on a computer.  The switch on the top disables the keys from

accidental use when you’re on the move.  The device has 70 hours

battery life and takes 2 hours to charge from a computer.  It can

only be used with a pair of earphones/headphones plugged into the

jack on the bottom.

Below is a chart of some vital features of the player:

 

Memory: 4 GB

Size: About the size of a lighter

Screen: 1 inch

Controls: 3 (can be pressed from either side)

Battery life: 70 hours

Charging time: 2 hours

Speech: Yes

Ebook reader: Yes

Internet access: No

Music listening: Yes

Radio: Yes

Recording: Yes

Memory stick or memory card support: No

Video support: No

 

Turning on/off the player and the main menu

To turn on Tiny Tunes, hold down the play button for 2 to 3

seconds.  It will take a few more seconds for the player to load

before the speech announces the first item on the main menu which

is music.  To turn off the player at any time, hold down the play

button for 5 seconds.  Visually on the screen, when you perform

this action, the machine reads `goodbye` although this message is

not spoken aloud.  On the main menu the following options are

available:

Music.

Continue listening.

Settings.

Browse.

Radio.

Text files.

Notes and Record.

You can select any of these items with the mode button which can

also be pressed from any place in the Tiny Tunes menu or app

system to return you to either the previous menu or the main

menu.

 

Music

The music app can play from a few different options.  These are

type of music, album, artist and all songs.  You can put music on

the machine by placing files or folders into the route of the

player when it is connected to a computer and the device will get

the info from the tags.  It only plays MP3 or WMA files.  Use the

arrow bar to move through your tracks.  The track names are

spoken aloud to you.  When you find one you want to hear, press

mode and then press play to hear it.  You can hold down the play

button for a second to find out the track name and album while

listening to a song.

 

Radio

MP3 player is a misleading name to say the least…  but that

is in a good way.  Tiny Tunes is much more than an MP3 player.

Well, as I’m describing here, it also includes an FM

radio–builtin.  of course.  When you select the radio app from

the main menu, you are placed back into the station you were

listening to last time.  You can use the arrow bar to move

through the stations available to you.  You can record FM radio

shows with the recording app (described later) too.  Of course,

the headphones are used to receive the signal for the radio.

 

Record and Notes

The Tiny Tunes player enables the recording of notes or longer

things using its internal microphone.  Simply select record from

the main menu, hold down play for half a second (then let go) and

speak.  You can pause the recording at any time just by pressing

play and then pressing it again when you’re ready to resume.

When you’ve done, hold down mode and you’ll be placed in the

notes folder where you can review and delete the note you’ve just

recorded or notes that you have recorded before.  Another way to

access the notes area of the device is to select notes from the

main menu and either select micrecord for microphone recordings

or fmrecord for radio recordings.  Then select the file from the

folder and hit mode, then hit play.

 

Books

The Tiny Tunes player also plays text files.  Just place them

on to the route of the player and it puts them automatically into

the text files section.  Your books will be read aloud in clear,

synthetic speech or the book can be read on the 1 inch display.

The book voice is the same voice that reads the rest of the

content on the Tiny Tunes player such as the menus and music

tracks.

 

Browse and Settings

In the main menu, there is an option called settings.  This has

several settings which modify the way the player works.  If you

want to use your player normally and are not some high tech music

developer etc these settings can be left at their defaults.

However, some are useful for people if you want a sleep timer,

auto shut down after so much time of inactivity, screen shut off

time and so on.  It also has speech enable/disable.

The browse function enables you to browse everything on your

player.  Just select browse and you can view books, audio and

recordings.

 

Personal Comments

I think the Tiny Tunes KD1000 MP3 player is an extremely

powerful device with many features and a long battery life.  I

believe that however many people have said that it is just like

tossing $75 in the trash, the player is certainly a player that

is worth buying.  It is good for all people whether they do not

use much technology or are computer geeks as it has a simple and

basic interface which is impossible for you to get lost in.

 

**I wrote this article in the hope that perhaps it may help with

the research and hopeful presentation of the Tiny Tunes player in

the future on Main Menu.  Maybe you could read the article out

with your demonstration or without it to give people more idea

about the player from a person who has first-hand experience with

the device.**

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Kitchen Knife With Guide, July 23, 2018

July 23, 2018

Meet the kitchen knife with the guide

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about the kitchen knife with the guide.

 

Meet the kitchen knife with a guide

 

No, no joking!  There is a kitchen knife out there that has a guide attached to it and this enables a blind person to use it safely without worrying about cutting one’s self.

 

This knife is good for anyone; not just a blind person.  The guide enables a blind person to feel along the blade of the knife and to set how thick they wish to cut their stuff.  It works and I use it all the time.  Once you get used to how to use it, your life becomes a bit easier in the kitchen.

 

So go out there and meet the kitchen knife with a guide.

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, In The Kitchen Part 2, July 16, 2018

July 16

In the kitchen part two

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about in the kitchen.

This is part two.  You can read part one for the week of July 09.

 

IN THE KITCHEN        part two

 

Stoves, thermostat controls, washing machines, and other household appliances with dials can be marked with small strips of colored electrical tape (several layers make it easier to feel), small strips of colored or clear embossing (demo) tape,

Locator Dots (available from CNIB) or by filing notches.  Only mark essential numbers to avoid a cluttered dial.  For example, put a piece(s) of bright colored contrasting tape on the oven dial at the twelve o’clock (top) position when the oven is off.  Put another piece(s) of tape on the stove where the 350  is.  When you turn the dial and match or line up the two pieces of tape, you will have a 350

or moderate oven. You will easily be able to judge temperatures above and below this point.

 

A wooden spoon or wooden rack puller (which doesn’t conduct heat) can be used to locate a hot oven rack, a dish on the rack, or to pull out the rack.

 

When reaching into the oven, prevent burns by wearing long flame-resistant oven mitts which extend to your elbow.  (These are available from the CNIB)

 

Before removing a casserole or baking dish from the oven, make sure the oven door is completely open and the rack pulled all the way out.

 

If you suspect a casserole or baking dish may boil over or splatter while in the oven, place a cookie sheet underneath to catch the spills.  It is easier to clean than the whole oven.

 

Use large print or raised dot (braille) timers as a guide to know when food is cooked.

You can also use other types of timers. You can also judge the readiness of food by using a combination of sensory clues – touch, smell, hearing, taste or remaining vision.

 

A muffin tin is ideal for baking potatoes, stuffed peppers, or tomatoes.  It is easier to locate and remove a muffin tin than several items scattered on the oven rack.

 

For even proportions of mashed potatoes and turnip, use an ice cream scoop.  A scoop is also useful for making muffins, cupcakes, etc., because it allows you to get equal amounts of batter in each section and is easier than pouring directly from a bowl or using a spoon.  Use a small ice cream scoop to make cookies.

 

To spread peanut butter, or other hard-to-spread foods, use a small narrow spatula.

 

Use a tray or cookie sheet to organize utensils and ingredients when cooking.  A tray catches any spills, making clean-up easier, and ensures small items are not misplaced.

 

Use measuring cups in graduated sizes (available in department stores and from Tupperware), rather than a one cup measure with small dividing lines marked in print.

 

To measure a portion of a block of butter or shortening, use a plastic stick which has notches cut for 1/4 cup, etc.

 

When measuring herbs and spices, sprinkle into the palm of your hand first so you are able to determine how much you are using.  This will prevent accidentally adding too much to a dish.

 

Measuring small amounts of liquid such as 1 tsp. vanilla is difficult.  Dipping is easier than pouring into a spoon.  You may find it beneficial to transfer liquids you use often into wide mouth containers for easy dipping.  Large eye droppers or a small plastic syringe are also great for measuring extracts, flavorings, and colorings.

 

To separate egg whites from yolks use an egg separator or small funnel (both available in department stores).  Or, break the egg into the palm of your hand and let the egg white run through your spread fingers.  The yolk will remain in your hand.

 

Fill a large salt shaker full of flour for dusting baking pans, making gravies, etc.  It isn’t messy and saves flour.

 

A canning funnel is helpful when pouring liquids into narrow-mouth containers.  Square-topped funnels are easier to use.

 

Place a jar lid, pebbles, or marbles in the bottom of your double boiler or kettle.  The rattling sound will signal if the water has boiled away.

 

Prevent ants, flour beetles, or other pests from invading your cupboards by leaving sage or bay leaves on food shelves.

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna